My first try on Film SLR


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macrob

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Aug 4, 2006
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Recently, I got a film SLR--the program A (not the one from Fengwei, ha.:sweat:). The size is so compact and mostly metal built, and I fall in love with it immediately.:heart: Tried it out and use 2 rolls, I scan them out by a canon 4400f.
I kinda not sure about the result, image quality wise, it is far not good as DSLR. I saw some very good works by film SLR on the web, wondering what's the problem with mine. Is it the process procedure (by image shop), or the scanner, or other reasons?
So, I look for help here, need some suggestions and comments, thanks guys.:thumbsup:

here is some pics I got.



 

macrob

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Aug 4, 2006
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these two produce very weired colour, dun know why.:rolleyes:



 

macrob

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so whats wrong with it, i think its pretty decent...it looks like film, feels like film and it sure makes me wanna try a few rolls of film this weekend...:)
Thanks man, actually I love this feeling also.

But I wonder, is it possible to get more cheerful image after scan? I think they still too "rough".

Any experience or tips on processing film to digital? :sweat:
 

alanswan

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Aug 23, 2005
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#7
You scanned straight from film to digital?
Try developing some onto paper and compare with your scanned images?

One thing though, for film development is unless you have access to the equipment, it's difficult to get the most out of your images.
Most developers just use generic settings for batch processing.
 

chegr

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Jan 31, 2007
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#8
or maybe the film just doesn't agree with our engineering canteen. :)
 

hjbyeo

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May 5, 2006
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#9
Enjoyed the shots, Macrob.. I like the digital revolution. But I don't mind shooting a few rolls of films, but won't bother to scan. Which film did you pop in?
 

ishou80

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Mar 9, 2008
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#10
I actually quite like the "feel" of all the picture esp. those tombs. The last 2 pic..NUS Sch of Design & Envt link to Eng canteen?
 

macrob

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You scanned straight from film to digital?
Try developing some onto paper and compare with your scanned images?

One thing though, for film development is unless you have access to the equipment, it's difficult to get the most out of your images.
Most developers just use generic settings for batch processing.
Yes, I scan them directly from film, and I havnt developed onto paper yet. I guess I will pick some to develop soon.
Film development is indeed something we cannot control, so, can just pray leh.

or maybe the film just doesn't agree with our engineering canteen.
Ya, maybe the engin canteen is cursed. :bsmilie:
Another reason, maybe these two film stay in the camera too long (1 week) after expn, and others are only one day before developing.

Enjoyed the shots, Macrob.. I like the digital revolution. But I don't mind shooting a few rolls of films, but won't bother to scan. Which film did you pop in?
I used Kodak Gold 200 this time, and I will try Fuji superia 200/400 next time. Any suggestions on choosing the film?
I do enjoy shooting film, although not expecting better image than DSLR.

I actually quite like the "feel" of all the picture esp. those tombs. The last 2 pic..NUS Sch of Design & Envt link to Eng canteen?
Yes, I like the feeling also.
But I find its hard to get good image for landscape, esply wide angle. :rolleyes:
That's the place, SDE to ENG.
 

baolong

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Apr 21, 2007
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#12
What types of lens are you using for your film shooting?
 

macrob

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Aug 4, 2006
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#13
What types of lens are you using for your film shooting?
For these two rolls, I used FA43, DA40, and DA21.

Personally, I find DA40 gives more natural colour.

Besides the "black circle", the image from DA21 also looks a little weired.

Im trying to buy some M/A lens back, see whether will be better.:bsmilie:
 

Apr 5, 2007
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#14
the sharpness and bokeh of the lens can be seen from the pictures :thumbsup: Someone else had commented that film has a more 3D feel to the images compared to digital, and though I can't agree absolutely, I'm beginning to see why that is the case.

Only the colour saturation and contrast seem off - from experience, all other things held equal, kodak film tend to be more warm toned, and fuji more cool - which did not seem to be the case here. It could be a matter of the scanning, in which case u can print from the negatives uncorrected to see if there is a difference, as alanswan suggested.

One suggestion - load your camera with slide film (can try the fuji velvia 100), that way you can see the contrast and saturation from the developed positive film. Though bearing in mind slide film tend to more saturated to begin with.

And you managed to use DA lens on ur camera? the program a allows aperture control from the camera body?
 

istDeS

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Dec 7, 2005
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#15
I used Kodak Gold 200 this time, and I will try Fuji superia 200/400 next time. Any suggestions on choosing the film?
I do enjoy shooting film, although not expecting better image than DSLR.
macrob, i did use the kodak gold 200 with my K1000 some months back. Maybe you want to take a look and have a feel. It is developed and scanned by the lab.

http://www.clubsnap.com/forums/showthread.php?t=366141
 

sbc

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Jun 27, 2005
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#17
For scanning films, I only trust Nikon Coolscan and the Minolta Dimage scanners. I have tried others like Benq and HP film scanners and they give only so so images.
 

macrob

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Aug 4, 2006
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#18
the sharpness and bokeh of the lens can be seen from the pictures. Someone else had commented that film has a more 3D feel to the images compared to digital, and though I can't agree absolutely, I'm beginning to see why that is the case.

Only the colour saturation and contrast seem off - from experience, all other things held equal, kodak film tend to be more warm toned, and fuji more cool - which did not seem to be the case here. It could be a matter of the scanning, in which case u can print from the negatives uncorrected to see if there is a difference, as alanswan suggested.

One suggestion - load your camera with slide film (can try the fuji velvia 100), that way you can see the contrast and saturation from the developed positive film. Though bearing in mind slide film tend to more saturated to begin with.

And you managed to use DA lens on ur camera? the program a allows aperture control from the camera body?
That's a lot help, thanks, bro. I think I may try positive film soon, yet dun know if my neighborhood lab can develop positive film.:embrass: They only sell two types negative film:bsmilie:
AS istDeS said, DA lens can only be used under P mode on my Program A.

macrob, i did use the kodak gold 200 with my K1000 some months back. Maybe you want to take a look and have a feel. It is developed and scanned by the lab.

http://www.clubsnap.com/forums/showthread.php?t=366141
:thumbsup:that's good. But I like to scan by my self, more things I can control.:sweat:

For scanning films, I only trust Nikon Coolscan and the Minolta Dimage scanners. I have tried others like Benq and HP film scanners and they give only so so images.
Those are something out of my budget:sweat:, anyway, I dun do it commercially, so I think I will use low level scanner for currently.
 

whoelse

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Oct 17, 2003
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#19
Time to consider a Pentax LX? :)
 

Apr 8, 2005
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#20
Try using positive film. It has more resolution and sharpness than film. More importantly, the colour will not shift so soon as film.

Since you are using DA lens, why there was no vignetting? Could you have croped the photo which would result in further loss in resolution and details?:embrass:
 

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