My first shot with my first dslr! :D


rcyrulez

New Member
Apr 29, 2011
30
0
0
#1


1. in what area is critique to be sought?
General aesthetics: The composition, lighting etc.

2. what one hopes to achieve with the piece of work?
I hope to convey the feeling's and thought's of the subject through its eyes

3. under what circumstance is the picture taken? (physical conditions/emotions)
Toying with my new dslr camera, playing with the settings with my dog as the subject. Subject was begging for a treat (as usual). It was taken at night, indoors under white florescent illumination.

4. what the critique seeker personally thinks of the picture
I feel it is interesting enough in terms of composition, although there some loss of detail due to the high iso used. Still, I believe the loss of detail creates a warmer, softer image of the subject which is appropriate for the image.

Hope to learn much from the pros here! :)
 

hawkrie

New Member
Oct 7, 2007
16
0
0
singapore
#3
having trouble with your focal point. is it the eye or the snout?

For the aesthetic perspective, try to find a more flattering angle about the subject, the teeth is rather 'imperfect' and distracts the viewer from the overall image.

it's a brief feedback and i hope it helps.

Cheers!

Hawkrie
 

zaren

Moderator
Staff member
Oct 27, 2003
10,975
33
48
#4
cute subject, nicely isolated from the background with a shallow dof to focus on the dog's face and right eye. suggest to correct the white balance and retrieve the natural colours of the dog.
e.g.
 

Apr 30, 2010
303
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Seagull
www.facebook.com
#5
cute subject, nicely isolated from the background with a shallow dof to focus on the dog's face and right eye. suggest to correct the white balance and retrieve the natural colours of the dog.
thats much better!


further down the road, TS may want to venture into basic post-processing, because your original made it look like some 50 year old picture (maybe you wanted that look?) ... so some handy skills would help you complete the look that you really want. another interesting perspective for pet photography would be to go really close, since you want the eyes to be the focus, why not go right in?
 

Jan 17, 2010
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#6
nice try and cutie pet, shoot more, experiment with the different settings available on the camera, you will achieve better shots, remember it's the person holding the camera that commands the shots.
 

Aug 14, 2010
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#7
Good shot given the constraints of the lighting condition and the uncontrollable subject. I have problem getting my kid to keep still. Lol.

Pity that the left eye is in the shadows. Could have done some PP adjustments to brighten that portion slightly. But if that's the look u wanted to capture, by all means leave it that way.

I like the composition, especially with the dog's tilted slightly back.
 

raptor84

Senior Member
Dec 6, 2005
4,726
1
38
Singapore
www.furry-photos.com
#8
I'm with zaren on correcting the white balance and burning out the B/G for better isolation and agree with nikology on the left eye in the shadow. You will learn how to spot areas of good lighting as you shoot more :)

Composition-wise i think it would be better if you either included the entire body or cropped it closer to more attention is on the eyes since your intent is to capture the emotions conveyed through the eyes.

Keep shooting and learning!
 

rcyrulez

New Member
Apr 29, 2011
30
0
0
#9


Thank you so much for the feedback guys! Here's my photo Mark II
 

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