My First Roll Of Film - Advice Needed


cichlid

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Dec 2, 2006
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#1
Hi

My colleague recently gave me a Nikon F65 film camera and I loaded the cam with an expired film (expired on 1/10/2008) to test.

The expired film was kept in the clothes wardrobe all this while.

I sent the roll of film to the Kodak shop at Kovan Heartland Mall to develop and scan to CD.

I find that the images are too grainy. Is it normal? Or are there something wrong due to the scanning part or because I used expired film or both?

Here is a sample pic
 

Leong23

Senior Member
Oct 18, 2007
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#3
Normally lab will scan at low resolution 8base jpeg file.

For me, i always send to scan at 16base tiff file
 

Nov 26, 2009
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#5
2 weeks ago i tried shooting on expired film. my film expired since 2005. and the result is much more grainy than yours. XD
 

Prismatic

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#6
It looks quite normal, as normal as scanning by photolabs goes. I believe if you want higher res scanning, most photolabs charge a premium.
 

cichlid

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#7
2 weeks ago i tried shooting on expired film. my film expired since 2005. and the result is much more grainy than yours. XD
haha..does the film sensor needs cleaning? I'm a total film noob.
 

cichlid

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Dec 2, 2006
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#8
It looks quite normal, as normal as scanning by photolabs goes. I believe if you want higher res scanning, most photolabs charge a premium.
Ok, so for my next new roll of film, probably will visit Peninsula area for scanning.
 

merelyok

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Jun 7, 2008
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#9
haha..does the film sensor needs cleaning? I'm a total film noob.
There's no need to...The 'film sensor' as you put it, is in essence, the strip of negative that is exposed everytime you depress the shutter and forward the film. It's a new sensor for everyshot!
 

cichlid

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Dec 2, 2006
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#10
I like this though, taken with 35mm f1.8 lens at f4 i think

 

Mar 5, 2010
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#11
i think the grains still makes it look nice tho
 

LexLim

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Feb 25, 2009
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#12
haha..does the film sensor needs cleaning? I'm a total film noob.
Film sensor? What's that never heard of that before aha:bsmilie:

The only things that perhaps, requires cleaning in a film SLR are the mirror and focusing screen:dunno:

I always thought those are artifacts instead of grains:dunno: since my pictures do not look like that when i "scan" using my DSLR
 

cichlid

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Dec 2, 2006
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#13
There's no need to...The 'film sensor' as you put it, is in essence, the strip of negative that is exposed everytime you depress the shutter and forward the film. It's a new sensor for everyshot!
Oh, haha, I feel so silly...and there is no WB adjustment right?
 

cichlid

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Dec 2, 2006
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#16
Under exposure can cause graininess too. Looks to me like a combo of lab sharpening and a bit of underexposure.
Actually, yes, I dialled in -0.5 EV as I read somewhere that one have to under-expose a bit for expired films.
 

Dream Merchant

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Jan 11, 2007
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#19
Summary is expired, under-sensitive film was under-exposed even more, developed as normal, came out real dark, lab scanned and brightened, inducing buckets of noise. :dunno:
 

cichlid

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Dec 2, 2006
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#20
Summary is expired, under-sensitive film was under-exposed even more, developed as normal, came out real dark, lab scanned and brightened, inducing buckets of noise. :dunno:
Yup, that's sums it up.

I'm hoping my next roll of film scanned to be like those found in our RF thread.
 

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