Motion blur


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tiger74

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Dec 21, 2009
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Little India
#1
Hi all,
I want to ask, the shutter speed must be pretty high for this photo, rite?


What I'm confused, shouldn't the trees on the background don't have the movement blur? :sweat:
 

ZerocoolAstra

Senior Member
Mar 13, 2008
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rainy Singapore
#2
Hi all,
I want to ask, the shutter speed must be pretty high for this photo, rite?


What I'm confused, shouldn't the trees on the background don't have the movement blur? :sweat:
ah... this photo is not yours?

The photographer is tracking the movement of the people and firing whilst on the move. Hence the trees are a blur.
 

Jul 5, 2007
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AMK
#3
This panning, where the camera VF move to keep the subject within the same focus point. Just like you turn your head. Bec moving subject is always in the same vision point, the subject appears stationary but the backgroup is blur

Not to get confused with track focus, where the camera is stationary while the lens keeps the moving subject in focus.
 

tiger74

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Dec 21, 2009
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Little India
#4
Thanks.
The photo is from BBC website :heart:
I just love the photographer managed to get the sharp expression on the faces and also on the flags.
 

sabee

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Mar 12, 2009
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#5
To be honest, its just as likely that a high shutter speed was used (seems like a bright day as you would expect on a parade) and motion blur was selectively added on in post processing. Its hard to tell especially without a high resolution pic and you can usually get away with it.
 

Feb 16, 2008
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the blue planet
#6
Hi all,
I want to ask, the shutter speed must be pretty high for this photo, rite?

What I'm confused, shouldn't the trees on the background don't have the movement blur? :sweat:
not necessarily high shutter speed.. 1/30 or 1/40 can also do it..
 

ZerocoolAstra

Senior Member
Mar 13, 2008
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#7
To be honest, its just as likely that a high shutter speed was used (seems like a bright day as you would expect on a parade) and motion blur was selectively added on in post processing. Its hard to tell especially without a high resolution pic and you can usually get away with it.
Hard to create the fluttering of the flag though... hard, but not impossible :)
Chances are they were on a moving vehicle in some sort of parade.
 

Dec 16, 2009
6
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Singapore
#8
just a question...
how u all set ur camera when want to take a pictures with motion?

wat need to be set??
 

Octarine

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Staff member
Jan 3, 2008
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Pasir Ris
#9
just a question...
how u all set ur camera when want to take a pictures with motion
wat need to be set??
Obviously the shutter speed is the key parameter that defines whether the motion gets frozen or not. So you will need a shutter speed that is slower than the minimum shutter speed to freeze the motion. Everything else (aperture, ISO) depends on the conditions. There is no magic number and no generic rule. It's lot of trial and error. But search for 'panning shots' here and see what the people use (hint: check the exif data).
 

Feb 16, 2008
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the blue planet
#10
just a question...
how u all set ur camera when want to take a pictures with motion?

wat need to be set??
simplest way is to:
1. set the cam in shutter priority mode.. 1/30-1/60 suits most of the situations..
2. better use continuous servo AF(AF-A for Nikon for e.g.) and fast burst mode..
3. follow the subject and press shutter while moving the camera along with the subject..
4. too blurr? increase the shutter speed..

not the best sample shot but taken with my humble D40 & 18-200 VR lens sometimes ago..

 

Last edited:
#11
To get this shot needs some practice but is do-able. Your camera should pan along with the subject at a similar speed to the speed of the subject. This will keep the subject sharp while the background is blur. Same principle as why if you are on a moving train and shoot a person on the train with you, the person is in focus and background is blur. This is because both you and your subject are moving at the same speed.
 

ahbian

Senior Member
May 23, 2006
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0
#12
Hi all,
I want to ask, the shutter speed must be pretty high for this photo, rite?


What I'm confused, shouldn't the trees on the background don't have the movement blur? :sweat:
Looks like panning and the people are on the back of some vehicle.

Just a point, its not nice to post up photos that don't belong to you, just include the link in your post if you need to make a reference.
 

dingaroo

New Member
Dec 6, 2009
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Singapore | East
#14
Whenever you want to freeze an action, I typically use this as a guideline:

When subject is walking, shutter speed is 1/60"

When subject is running, shutter speed is 1/125"

When subject is cycling, a fast animal, or a fast sports occasion, shutter speed is 1/250"

When subject is a motor car/fast moving water (fountain), shutter speed is 1/500"

HTH.
 

ZerocoolAstra

Senior Member
Mar 13, 2008
9,522
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rainy Singapore
#15
Whenever you want to freeze an action, I typically use this as a guideline:

When subject is walking, shutter speed is 1/60"

When subject is running, shutter speed is 1/125"

When subject is cycling, a fast animal, or a fast sports occasion, shutter speed is 1/250"

When subject is a motor car/fast moving water (fountain), shutter speed is 1/500"

HTH.
but that would probably freeze the entire photo.
In the example photo, the shutter speed is probably closer to 1/60 or thereabouts.
Then by panning and firing, the subject's motion is captured/frozen, but the background is rendered with motion blur.
 

wildcat

Senior Member
Sep 8, 2004
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Bedok
#16
but that would probably freeze the entire photo.
In the example photo, the shutter speed is probably closer to 1/60 or thereabouts.
Then by panning and firing, the subject's motion is captured/frozen, but the background is rendered with motion blur.
Yep. Another way is a nice combo of having high aperture, moderate speed shutter speed. That way, the background - already blur from high aperture settings - is made even blurrer with panning motion, while subject's movements not catered by panning such as waving of hands, flags in the wind, are not as blurred.
 

ahbian

Senior Member
May 23, 2006
2,467
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0
#19
does focal length affect the shutter speed in any way?
One way i can look at it is this.

Given the same focal length and shutter speed, motion blur is more obvious for a subject that is closer to the camera then a subject that is further away from the camera.
 

mfbatzap

New Member
Jan 24, 2007
363
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Tampines
#20
so do I need to keep my shutter speed abv 1/100 if I shoot with a 100mm lens? hehe.. sorry for hijacking the thread abit.. wanna learn more too :)
 

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