More difficult to get sharp images with A7R3


ernestt

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Nov 18, 2011
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After upgrading from A7 to A7R3, I realize that it is more difficult to get sharp images. I mean, the percentage of images taken with A7R3 is lower compared to A7.

Does anyone has similar experience and any suggestion on what to watch out for?

Thanks in advance.
 

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one eye jack

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Jun 11, 2011
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After upgrading from A7 to A7R3, I realize that it is more difficult to get sharp images. I mean, the percentage of images taken with A7R3 is lower compared to A7.

Does anyone has similar experience and any suggestion on what to watch out for?

Thanks in advance.
I'm not a sony user. From A7 to A7R3 is 3 generation of technology improvement so I guess it's not uncommon people find bewildered by the features and the differences of how each camera work. I know it's no consolation if people tell you to read the camera user manual.

Of course you can search online for answers but it's not straight forward but with effort you can take an online tutorial like this focus masterclass by Mark Galer. Much useful tips.

[/URL]
 

one eye jack

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Jun 11, 2011
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Sorry the link above does not work. My appologies. Here it is again.

 

ernestt

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Nov 18, 2011
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I believe the subjects are in focus, but the entire image looks just a tiny bit fuzzy. Can tell the difference when comparing with other pictures taken with the same lens in the same environment that is sharp.

Sometimes I even wonder if the ibis is working well.
 

Octarine

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Do a structured test in order to find out whether it's the camera or yourself.
Use either a focus test chart or any other defined target, test on tripod with IBIS off etc., then test handheld.
When using handheld, make sure your shutter speed is fast enough (old rule of shutter speed = 1 / focal length or faster). Test with IBIS on and off.
The key is to keep all other parameters stable and only change one in order to see what the root cause is. In many cases the problem is behind the viewfinder. ;)
 

fuwen

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Aug 11, 2004
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After upgrading from A7 to A7R3, I realize that it is more difficult to get sharp images. I mean, the percentage of images taken with A7R3 is lower compared to A7.

Does anyone has similar experience and any suggestion on what to watch out for?

Thanks in advance.
You upgraded from A7 to A7R3, and R3 has a very high resolution sensor. Higher resolution will also capture more obvious focusing error and camera shake. You try to take test shots on tripod with shutter speed 1/250 or more to confirm. With high resolution sensors you need to be more careful with focusing accuracy and camera shake.
 

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kynoe

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Oct 23, 2006
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Post a few photos of what you mean by not sharp in high resolution JPEG. Probably we can diagnose from there
 

Blubberbored

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Nov 19, 2020
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Got the same issues as @ernestt! When I pixel peep, it doesn't seem to be as clear as when others take pictures.
 

one eye jack

Senior Member
Jun 11, 2011
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Got the same issues as @ernestt! When I pixel peep, it doesn't seem to be as clear as when others take pictures.
Know the difference between sharpness, accutance and resolution. Resolution can be quantified but the other two is subjective. If you understand what sharpness and accutance means then you can improve the photo in editing as well as during the picture taking process. Of course a good lens and lighting helps. Please read read the link below for better understanding.
Finally when people look at your photo they really don't care what you think is important in a photo.
What does your photo mean or inspire in other's viewpoint. If you pixel peep then you miss the point of photography.

.

Edit: A similar blurry experience elsewhere.

 

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swifty

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Oct 12, 2004
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Part of the issue may be the pixel peeping.
Are you guys comparing A7 and A7R3 results both at 100% on screen?
If so, because there are much more pixels on an A7R3 and the pixel sizes of your screen is fixed, you’re magnifying the results more from the A7R3 when you display it at 100% compared to the A7. So naturally it will appear less sharp.

You need to normalise the results to compare.
Eg. You can choose ‘fit to screen’ from both files and compare it that way.
Or, let’s say you want to display it at a particular resolution eg. 3240X2160. You resize both files to 3240X2160, then compare the results.
Alternatively you can pick a print size, let’s say 12X8”. Print from both files to that size and compare the results.
 

Blubberbored

New Member
Nov 19, 2020
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Know the difference between sharpness, accutance and resolution. Resolution can be quantified but the other two is subjective. If you understand what sharpness and accutance means then you can improve the photo in editing as well as during the picture taking process. Of course a good lens and lighting helps. Please read read the link below for better understanding.
Finally when people look at your photo they really don't care what you think is important in a photo.
What does your photo mean or inspire in other's viewpoint. If you pixel peep then you miss the point of photography.

.

Edit: A similar blurry experience elsewhere.

Thanks! I appreciate the breakdown :) The URL doesn't work though pity hahahah but I'll read it up!
 

ricohflex

Senior Member
Feb 24, 2005
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If you surf internet, this seems a common problem experienced by others.
No idea why. Design/manufacturing defect? Maybe. User not knowledgeable about his camera? Maybe.

When you wish to or actually do examine the photo at high magnification, this is NORMAL.
There is nothing wrong with you.


After all, you paid $$$ to buy a camera with higher Megapixel sensor.
Don't you want to know whether you got what you paid for?
Of course.

There is nothing wrong with that action. Nothing wrong with wanting to know.

The phrase "Pixel Peeping" was probably invented by some disgruntled fanboy of outdated obsolete cameras who wanted to defend a low MP camera.
The phrase "Pixel Peeping" is derogatory and insulting to anyone who checks his photos at high magnification.

The idea is to offensively label people who ask perfectly normal questions about their equipment, after handing over large sums of money to buy it.
As if they did some thing "WRONG".
As if they should not have done it or even thought of asking an obvious question.

 

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one eye jack

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Jun 11, 2011
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The phrase "Pixel Peeping" was probably invented by some disgruntled fanboy of outdated obsolete cameras who wanted to defend a low MP camera.
The phrase "Pixel Peeping" is derogatory and insulting to anyone who checks his photos at high magnification.

The idea is to offensively label people who ask perfectly normal questions about their equipment, after handing over large sums of money to buy it.
As if they did some thing "WRONG".
As if they should not have done it or even thought of asking an obvious question.
Thank you for being ricohflex. I agree that there's nothing wrong with asking such questions but as I know and understand more about photography I can empathise with you and others.

Firstly I'm not a know it all but someone who understands the technology of what is being used in cameras and output devices like computer monitor. Photos are mostly raster image vs a vector image like a logo. As such a rastor image is made up of pixels. If you zoom into a rastor image there will be an effect called pixelation.

Raster vs vector image


Dithering_example_undithered.png


Credit: wikipedia

It simply means you have zoomed to the maximum where there is little resolution or pixels in that particular area much like using telephoto lens with small angle of view.

The more important thing to note is I think that focusing and steadying the picture capturing moment via proper holding the camera. There is also a marketing misinformation regarding focus by phase detect and contrast detection because even in Dslr they use both but in selling cameras that have phase detection they make contrast detection as inferior when it is the most accurate. It's just the way contrast detection gets focus by focusing back and forth the exact focus that makes it look like hunting and slow but it's just how it works which is efficient unlike phase detect used mostly for fast movement in sports and wildlife photography.


Lastly there are techniques to shoot that make use of colour theory and light contrast of subjects against backgrounds that are in contrast with the subject whether in terms of colour and lighting that appear to look sharp. Unfortunately videos of colour theory are a bit long and dry which I feel will bore readers but do check them out if you want to learn to better your photography.
 

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Pitachu

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Sep 18, 2019
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I disagree. My friends using higher resolution cameras call me Pixel Peeping too when I do that.
Everyone, whether with high or low resolution cameras, do at some point in time, zoom in all the way to check the details of their images.
I don't see anything wrong being called Pixel Peeping. All photo retouch artists do that do!

When I say, "20mp is enough for me unless you pixel peep", I don't mean to be derogatory as I am referring to myself.
Most of my images are meant for Photobooks and Social Media.
Photobooks are A3 size or smaller (most are A4) and usually printed at 300dpi for high quality prints.
I have done comparisons before with higher resolution cameras and it is not easy to tell the difference on the output of photobook pages.
So, there is not much point for me to shoot beyond 20mp, unless there is a need to.

I still have my good old Canon EOS 5D mk2 and Sony A7R I have never been disgruntled about it or see it as obsolete, as it continue to deliver
good images for our clients reliably!

I think it is your statements which are derogatory, calling people with low MP cameras, disgruntled and with obsolete camera.

Cameras are never obsolete as long as they are able to provide good images. Dont be caught up with all the marketing hype of
having to upgrade to the latest camera bodies and accessories.

The phrase "Pixel Peeping" was probably invented by some disgruntled fanboy of outdated obsolete cameras who wanted to defend a low MP camera.
The phrase "Pixel Peeping" is derogatory and insulting to anyone who checks his photos at high magnification.
 

qystan

Member
Jul 8, 2010
493
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After upgrading from A7 to A7R3, I realize that it is more difficult to get sharp images. I mean, the percentage of images taken with A7R3 is lower compared to A7.

Does anyone has similar experience and any suggestion on what to watch out for?

Thanks in advance.

I just got the 7RM4 and I'm having this issue, many pix took are just slightly off but there are nice and sharp ones, even on a tripod. The previous A6400 which pretty much gives me sharp shots when the focus box is green. I sent the camera back to Sony for a check and they confirmed that the focus is fine.

I've upped the shutter speeds from my usual low of 125-250 to the 1000 region and seems to be getting better pix. Still verifying results but does seem that the higher pixels is picking up camera shakes that was not a problem at 20mp.

Informatively, lens is the 200-600, mostly at the 600 end.
 

one eye jack

Senior Member
Jun 11, 2011
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Generally mirrorless cameras give sharper photos because there is no mirror box like dSLR and with higher pixel count ( smaller pixel size ) there is less tolerance to camera shake so using higher shutter speed or higher iso helps but if you use super telephoto lens then there are other factors to consider for sharper photos like autofocus settings and using higher shutter speed than the reciprocal of focal length sometimes 3 times or more for fast moving objects. Also depth of field ( aperture ) but at the end of the day sharpness is not everything. Sharpness is perceived not something you can get by upgrading gear but also by post processing. More in the video. LP


More tips..

 

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ziggy

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May 24, 2006
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In my many years of taking photos since the film era, all the blurred pictures I took were due to focusing error. Not lens, not cameras. Because when used correctly, all the pics were sharp. High resolution sensors make focusing errors more obvious. Learn and practice shooting techniques, use the right shutter speeds, etc. The tech in cameras nowadays is amazing, but one needs to understand the photo taking process to be able to use the tech, eg ibis/is, etc and when to use what.
 

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