Model Photography


Jun 22, 2010
223
0
0
26
Sengkang
#1
Hey guys, I"m quiet interested in trying out model photography but though i might need some tips before going there and waste my time taking lousy shots.
I'm using a Canon 500D with EF-S18-135mm f/3.5-5.6 IS and EF50mm f/1.8 II

so yah some questions i was wondering was....

1) suitable type of lens (specifics if possible) that you guys have used and produce great photos with. Just wanted to hear some recommendations. I'm gonna rent so budget wise its under 100.

2) Metering mode, I really have no idea what the differences are but I'll go read up on it, but just wanted to hear for other's experience, the best metering settings to use.

3) How to achieve a picture with the closest object in great focus but the background in a blurr. I've done this before but didnt always come out the same.

eg...

Good kind



Bad Kind



so yah could i get some advice on how to achieve the first picture constantly. I'm not gonna always use tt style but just wanna know.



4) how does a photo-shoot work?
If there is like 6 photographers and 1 model, do all of them shoot at the same time or take turns?
May be some one experienced could enlighten me abit more on the subject, may be in dept like poses and communication with organizer and model.


5) Is a flash a necessity?

6) after pictures are taken, what are some of the privacy or copy right issues that might normally arise. Eg. posing on FB or Portfolio sites



Thanks :D
 

Last edited:

zac08

Senior Member
Feb 21, 2005
11,755
0
0
East
#2
Go find out more on aperture control and the DOF.

What you want to achieve is low DOF and using a large aperture will give you such an effect. Note that you'd need to balance it with the focal length as well as the distance of the subject to the camera as well as the distance of the BG to the subject as well.

As for mode, you'd want to use aperture priority to have control over the above mentioned effect.

Practise with your 50mm f1.8 and you'll see.
 

Jun 22, 2010
223
0
0
26
Sengkang
#3
Go find out more on aperture control and the DOF.

What you want to achieve is low DOF and using a large aperture will give you such an effect. Note that you'd need to balance it with the focal length as well as the distance of the subject to the camera as well as the distance of the BG to the subject as well.

As for mode, you'd want to use aperture priority to have control over the above mentioned effect.

Practise with your 50mm f1.8 and you'll see.
Thanks...:D
DOF = Depth of Field

right? lol
ok I will take a look at that
 

dingaroo

New Member
Dec 6, 2009
1,950
0
0
Singapore | East
#4
Go join those paid model shoots and learn from the others and the organizers.
 

Oct 31, 2009
158
0
0
#5
agree with ding
most other shooters and some photog orgganisers can teach u a lot more on site than googling or reading

Go join those paid model shoots and learn from the others and the organizers.
 

Jun 22, 2010
223
0
0
26
Sengkang
#6
Go join those paid model shoots and learn from the others and the organizers.
4) how does a photo-shoot work?
If there is like 6 photographers and 1 model, do all of them shoot at the same time or take turns?
May be some one experienced could enlighten me abit more on the subject, may be in dept like poses and communication with organizer and model.

any advice :D?
 

night86mare

Deregistered
Aug 25, 2006
25,541
0
0
www.pbase.com
#7
agree with ding
most other shooters and some photog orgganisers can teach u a lot more on site than googling or reading
i'll be fair, 80% (to be honest, i felt like putting 95%, but a more conservative estimate hor) of the people shooting xmm in those mass photoshoot do not produce anything really worth keeping in my book.

TS should ask uncle kongo to teach him a few things. :)
 

catchlights

Moderator
Staff member
Sep 27, 2004
21,903
46
48
Punggol, Singapore
www.foto-u.com
#8
1) suitable type of lens (specifics if possible) that you guys have used and produce great photos with. Just wanted to hear some recommendations. I'm gonna rent so budget wise its under 100.
you can use your existing kit lens to shoot portrait, I believe if ones can't produce a decent portrait with a normal type of lens, using a best lens will not turn a normal shot into a great shot.
2) Metering mode, I really have no idea what the differences are but I'll go read up on it, but just wanted to hear for other's experience, the best metering settings to use.
understand about exposure and metering mode is very fundamental, suggest you learn and understand the basic first before venture into more complicated stuffs.

3) How to achieve a picture with the closest object in great focus but the background in a blurr. I've done this before but didnt always come out the same.
portrait is about capture the likeness of a person, narrow DOF may help but is not always the must, pay attentions on what is the essences of a portrait.

4) how does a photo-shoot work?
If there is like 6 photographers and 1 model, do all of them shoot at the same time or take turns?
May be some one experienced could enlighten me abit more on the subject, may be in dept like poses and communication with organizer and model.
can't help you on these as I don't join photoshoot, usually shoot alone.
5) Is a flash a necessity?
depends on your shooting style, but from I see what being done here, most of the time has no choice cos nobody care much about posing the model under the right lighting.

6) after pictures are taken, what are some of the privacy or copy right issues that might normally arise. Eg. posing on FB or Portfolio sites
as in paid photoshoots here, the photographer paid to get the photos of the models, they own the photos and entitle to use in whatever way they see fit, unless photographers want enter an agreement with the models for not disclose/publish the photos.

hope this help.
 

pokiemon

Senior Member
Mar 5, 2005
2,039
0
0
#9
hi ts, i would suggest speaking to some organisers to find out more about studio shoots.

imo, the most impt skill/knowledge about studio shoot is lighting. so attending an orgnanised shoot allows you to learn about the equipment and how a typical shoot is set up.
 

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