Microwave water beware.


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soma

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Aug 13, 2005
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#1
receive a mail regarding this:

Be careful when you are boiling water from the microwave and putting
MILO into it.


A 26-year old person decided to have a cup of coffee. He took a
cup of water and put it in the microwave to heat it up (something
that he had
donenumerous times before).
I am not sure how long he set the timer for, but he told me he
wanted to bring the water to a boil. When the timer shut the oven
off, he removed
thecup from the oven. As he looked into the cup, he noted that the
water was not boiling, but instantly the water in the cup "blew
up" into his face.

The cup remained intact until he threw it out of his hand but all
the
waterhad flown out into his face due to the build up of energy. His
whole face is blistered and he has 1st and 2nd degree burns to
his face which may leave scarring. He also may have lost partial
sight in his left eye.


While at the hospital, the doctor who was attending to him stated
this
is fairly common occurrence and water (alone) should never be
heated in a microwave oven. If water is heated in this manner,
something should be placed in the cup to diffuse the energy such
as: a wooden stir stick, tea bag, etc. It is however a much saf
er choice to boil the water in a tea kettle.

General Electric's response:

Thanks for contacting us. I will be happy to assist you.
The e-mail that you received is correct.
Microwaved water and other liquids do not always bubble when they
reach
theboiling point. They can actually get superheated and not bubble
at all. The superheated liquid will bubble up out of the cup when
it is moved or when something like a spoon or tea bag is put into it.

To prevent this from happening and causing injury, do not heat
any liquid for more than two minutes per cup. After heating, let
the cup stand in the microwave for thirty seconds before moving
it or adding anything into it.


If you pass this on ... you could very well save someone from a
lot of
painand suffering .

Try to attach link of mpg from email but don't know how?
 

Deadpoet

Senior Member
Oct 18, 2004
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#2
soma said:
receive a mail regarding this:

Be careful when you are boiling water from the microwave and putting
MILO into it.


A 26-year old person decided to have a cup of coffee. He took a
cup of water and put it in the microwave to heat it up (something
that he had
donenumerous times before).
I am not sure how long he set the timer for, but he told me he
wanted to bring the water to a boil. When the timer shut the oven
off, he removed
thecup from the oven. As he looked into the cup, he noted that the
water was not boiling, but instantly the water in the cup "blew
up" into his face.

The cup remained intact until he threw it out of his hand but all
the
waterhad flown out into his face due to the build up of energy. His
whole face is blistered and he has 1st and 2nd degree burns to
his face which may leave scarring. He also may have lost partial
sight in his left eye.


While at the hospital, the doctor who was attending to him stated
this
is fairly common occurrence and water (alone) should never be
heated in a microwave oven. If water is heated in this manner,
something should be placed in the cup to diffuse the energy such
as: a wooden stir stick, tea bag, etc. It is however a much saf
er choice to boil the water in a tea kettle.

General Electric's response:

Thanks for contacting us. I will be happy to assist you.
The e-mail that you received is correct.
Microwaved water and other liquids do not always bubble when they
reach
theboiling point. They can actually get superheated and not bubble
at all. The superheated liquid will bubble up out of the cup when
it is moved or when something like a spoon or tea bag is put into it.

To prevent this from happening and causing injury, do not heat
any liquid for more than two minutes per cup. After heating, let
the cup stand in the microwave for thirty seconds before moving
it or adding anything into it.


If you pass this on ... you could very well save someone from a
lot of
painand suffering .

Try to attach link of mpg from email but don't know how?
sounds like another urban legend
 

soma

Senior Member
Aug 13, 2005
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#3
Deadpoet said:
sounds like another urban legend
How to send a mpg link here from my mail attachment?

Test are done in the lab and this is not urban legend:nono:

Hongsien is an expert on the urban legend thing....:bsmilie: HS where are you.
 

David

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Mar 21, 2002
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#4
Been getting and seeing this post circulating.. How true is it? Maybe the engineering/physics experts wud like to comment? I'm very skeptical abt it. In fact I've tried it and nothing of tt sort happens... The explanation sounds lame based on my physics knowledge.
 

hongsien

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Mar 11, 2002
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#7
Apparently, this this CAN happen, but very rarely. .....I think this email is just a scam, but there is some truth in it. The original email didn't have milo in the story, but it was a cup of soup:

http://www.scambusters.org/urban-legends/microwave-oven.html

Here are real experiments, but do NOT try this at home they say for obvious reasons (I am sure one of you wil try):
http://www.eskimo.com/~billb/weird/microexp.html

Read the part about exploding coffee, it is about superheated water that didn't have a chance to boil in a microwave......


For more 'funny' and 'not so funny' legends/hoaxes:

http://www.scambusters.org/legends.html

HS
 

soma

Senior Member
Aug 13, 2005
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#9
hongsien said:
Apparently, this this CAN happen, but very rarely. .....I think this email is just a scam, but there is some truth in it. The original email didn't have milo in the story, but it was a cup of soup:

http://www.scambusters.org/urban-legends/microwave-oven.html

Here are real experiments, but do NOT try this at home they say for obvious reasons (I am sure one of you wil try):
http://www.eskimo.com/~billb/weird/microexp.html


For more 'funny' and 'not so funny' legends/hoaxes:

http://www.scambusters.org/legends.html

HS
The email put MILO because the mepg test show heat up water and then pour milo into it and it exploded. How can i attach the mepg attachment from my email?
 

C

cardsharpclark

Guest
#10
sammy888 said:
Your decent source cited it from an Urban Legend link. hehehehe....
No, I said that linked article cited decent sources. The FDA, a university physics dept., a science magazine article, and Bill Beaty.
 

#11
hongsien said:
Apparently, this this CAN happen, but very rarely. .....I think this email is just a scam, but there is some truth in it. The original email didn't have milo in the story, but it was a cup of soup:

Actually in experiments they did recreate that bursting bubbling effect( explosion is really pulling the story abit too far) you need clean water, a very flawlessly smooth glass surface..etc...if there was any other substance in the water ( milo, object etc) to pollute it, it will not trigger the boiling. So long as there is sign of boiling, the water is not holding back that heating energy thus it can't burst or start to boil as the energy is released. That glass used and other factor basically makes it almost unlikely anyone would experience this abeit just a rare few meeting those clinical experimental conditions.

If not mistaken this was covered in an episode of the Mythsbuster on the Discovery Channel.
 

hongsien

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Mar 11, 2002
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#12
soma said:
The email put MILO because the mepg test show heat up water and then pour milo into it and it exploded. How can i attach the mepg attachment from my email?
Just attach the link address would be the best........and don't worry, we believe you! :)

HS
 

hongsien

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Mar 11, 2002
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#18
Sollly! My IE acting a little weird............the message was transmitting while I was still typing! And this is no urban legend!!!

HS
 

jsbn

Senior Member
Jul 24, 2002
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#19
Deadpoet said:
sounds like another urban legend
Hmm... This is a phnomena called 'superheating'.

Basically its how the microwaves excite the water molecules to the point where they are very unstable. But since the water is still, there isn't any 'seeds' for causing the water the boil. Coffee power, Milo or any powdered substance provide this 'seed' to cause the water to boil instantly and very fast.

Yup. Something like dat.
 

kitkat

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Mar 5, 2005
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#20
soma said:
The email put MILO because the mepg test show heat up water and then pour milo into it and it exploded. How can i attach the mepg attachment from my email?

Did some research during my uni days on microwave ovens radiofrequency hazards ... this case is extremely remote as long you follow safety precautions. I have being trying this ever since I bought an oven and nothing this sort has happens.

It will depend largely on the tissue (contents in oven) and frequencies generated. Microwave radiation at 2450MHz is non-ionizing and sufficient intensity will cause matter molecules to vibrate and causing vibration - aka heat that cooks.

There are alot of journals written about safety and relationship (with food and safety) in several. institutions. Some very light reading at UNW
 

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