Metering?


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Jul 25, 2007
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#1
Hi all..

I have had many opportunities to observe pro photographers shooting indoor/event. Realise that they always half-hold button, point to another object, before pointing back at the subject and shooting. I believe it's to tell the camera how much black or white there is to make the photo brighter, right? Could someone/s explain how this technique works?

Thanks a lot! :)
 

Atarandas

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Aug 19, 2008
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#2
Hi all..

I have had many opportunities to observe pro photographers shooting indoor/event. Realise that they always half-hold button, point to another object, before pointing back at the subject and shooting. I believe it's to tell the camera how much black or white there is to make the photo brighter, right? Could someone/s explain how this technique works?

Thanks a lot! :)

Hi there =),

I believe theres an article in the " article and guides " for newbies section that talks on metering. You can go there and take a look . alternatively you can head off to the library to grab any books that talks about exposure.

You have gotten a rough idea about the amount of black or white , essentially , what they are trying to do is to meter off a spot or area , to measure the settings for a correct exposure. The half press method locks , the exposure meter in the camera , and allows the photographer to recompose before capturing the image.

Thats the general idea . Bros please do amend me if I have explained this incorrectly :sweat:
 

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Octarine

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Jan 3, 2008
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Pasir Ris
#3
It can also be the method of "focus lock & recompose" - which has nothing to do with metering. Unless you know the settings of the camera it can be either one of the 2 methods: "Exposure Lock & Recompose" or "Focus Lock & recompose" - or even both.
Focus lock is used when the main object is not placed under one of the focus points of the camera (be it intentionally or not). Then it's good to use a single focus point (check camera manual how to use it), focus on the main subject, lock the focus, recompose the picture and press the shutter fully.
 

Jul 25, 2007
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#4
Hi..
thanks for the reponses. could you explain more on the recomposition part?

thks bro
 

calebk

Senior Member
Jul 25, 2006
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Clementi
#5
It's quite simple. Most likely, they are using the center focus point, so they are focusing on whichever subject they want in focus.

Now, if they want the subject in the center, then all well and good, they just fire off after shooting, but sometimes, you want an offset subject (such as when following the rule of thirds), so after focusing using the center AF point, they then recompose to shoot the scene with the subject at whichever placement they wish, while holding the shutter release at half-press to maintain that focus lock.

I do believe, in most cases, it has nothing to do with metering.
 

Dream Merchant

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Jan 11, 2007
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#6
Depending on how a camera is configured or customised to work. It could be focus lock recompose, or FLR and Auto Exposure Lock AEL, or FLR alone, or FLR AND AEL but so far, I don't see many togs using AEL that way.

Also, on the area of focus lock, apparently and according to Canon's literature, FLR is not always accurate, especially for distances under 15 feet.
 

Rashkae

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Nov 28, 2005
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#8
Hi..
thanks for the reponses. could you explain more on the recomposition part?

thks bro
This is explained in almost all camera manuals in the "focus" section, as well as discussed extensively here and online. Please try a search for "recompose picture" or "focus recompose"
 

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