metering


Status
Not open for further replies.
S

Shoot

Guest
#1
Hi to the gurus out there!

Just a question abt metering.

Say ya wanna take a picture where the main subject, eg flower is bright yellow, agst a dark background, eg tree bark, and still want a large DOF(so everything is still sharp, good detail on the bark pattern, etc...), do you still meter on the flower/main subject..... ad if so, do you have to adjust a stop down/up to make sure the back is still sharp?

Similarly for a darn bright background, say blue-skier on white snow... what's the trick.

I know ya don't meter off bright white skies, the setting, rising sun, if you don't want silhouette effects yes?

Also, when you meter, it's automatic reading right, as in one doesnot have to half depress the shutter release to get the meter reading.

Also, spot/centre-weighted metering better for what I have been talking about vs matrix metering?

By the way, when one says you adjust a stop down, is that reducing the F-no. or reducing aperture, ie increasing F-no.?

Thx for the indulgence and patience ....


:embrass:
 

d7t3

New Member
Oct 3, 2002
690
0
0
In the Shepherd's hands
#2
Hi to the gurus out there!

I'm not a guru, but i'll try to answer.

Just a question abt metering.

Rather, many questions!...

Say ya wanna take a picture where the main subject, eg flower is bright yellow, agst a dark background, eg tree bark, and still want a large DOF(so everything is still sharp, good detail on the bark pattern, etc...), do you still meter on the flower/main subject..... ad if so, do you have to adjust a stop down/up to make sure the back is still sharp?

There are two issues: metering (which is about brightness) and DOF (which is about aperture).

Also, spot/centre-weighted metering better for what I have been talking about vs matrix metering?

First, metering. Whichever method (matrix, spot etc.) you use, the main aim of the camera's meter is to make your subject a medium tone. If you don't want your subject to be a medium tone, then you do exposure compensation (to get a lighter or darker tone). (+) to get a lighter image, and (-) to get a darker one.

What you do depends on exactly what method you use. If there's a brown bird on snow, and you use matrix or centre-weighted, you may need to give +1 or +2 compensation. If you spot-meter the bird only, you may not need to compensate, or even -1/2 if the bird is dark brown.

By the way, when one says you adjust a stop down, is that reducing the F-no. or reducing aperture, ie increasing F-no.?

A stop down means less light, either increasing f-no. or increasing shutter speed.


Second, DOF. If you want a good DOF, then use a smaller aperture, e.g. f22. If you need to compensate for your camera's meter, then you just adjust the shutter speed accordingly.
 

sljm

New Member
Dec 2, 2002
308
0
0
38
Singapore
sljm.tripod.com
#3
Ur camera meter are all reflected light meter, so if ur subject is bright u may need to over exposed if using spot or center for matirx they should be able to judge where is the midtone. Alternatively use a 18% grey card to meter or a ambient light meter
 

S

Shoot

Guest
#4
Hi

Thx a lot for your time ... esp d7t3!

Guess everyone else seems a guru to me, considering how much .. or rather how little ... i know!

cheers and will give your suggestions a try!
 

Status
Not open for further replies.
Top Bottom