metering modes.


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Oct 26, 2008
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Yishun.
#1
hey guys, i was just curious? i just want to know from a show of replies what sort of metering methods you guys use.

i was reading this very detailed article on spot metering and, to me i feel that i have to go about learning how to use my imagination to see "middle-grey" in every shot i take. or just get a "middle-grey" card for metering purposes.

i have one question. when people mention metering "middle-grey" i am meant to meter it to the correct exposure yes? and the once metered on the "middle-grey" i EV/L, compose and shoot??
 

Reportage

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Nov 24, 2008
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#2
read up white balance.

as for what metering modes, depends on the environment of the shoot.
 

Oct 26, 2008
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Yishun.
#3
erm, i dont mean to be rude but what does WB have to do with metering?
maybe you could enlighten me? really i mean no disrespect.

most of the newer models of camera's have very decent AUTO WB modes. in fact a few websites mention leaving WB in AUTO mode. (just to mention 1, kenrockwell.com)
cause the camera seems to make correct judgement calls. unless you have incandescent lights, that suprisingly mess with most WB's in AUTO.

i understand Matrix Metering, averages the Exposure from metering most parts of the frame yes?
which could lead under-exposed shots if the subject is standing in the foreground of strong lighting, say a sunset?
 

Reportage

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Nov 24, 2008
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#4
its pretty simple...if the white balance can be easily done, centre-weighted is recommended. If so difficult till eventually just leave on auto, use spot metering.
 

catchlights

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#5
its pretty simple...if the white balance can be easily done, centre-weighted is recommended. If so difficult till eventually just leave on auto, use spot metering.
ts is asking about metering mode, what is there have to do with wb?



and what advice can ts learn from your suggestion?
 

Reportage

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Nov 24, 2008
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#6
depends...just give it a try. Using a camera like the K20D for events, conventional theory goes out the door.
 

catchlights

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#7
depends...just give it a try. Using a camera like the K20D for events, conventional theory goes out the door.
exposure and white balance are two different things.

you can get perfect white balance, but will not guarantee your exposure will be on the dot,

and you can get a spot on exposure, does not mean your white balance is good too.

this is not a conventional theory, is fundamental of photography.
 

blazer_workz

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May 8, 2006
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#8
exposure and white balance are two different things.

you can get perfect white balance, but will not guarantee your exposure will be on the dot,

and you can get a spot on exposure, does not mean your white balance is good too.

this is not a conventional theory, is fundamental of photography.
i believe what Reportage is trying to explain is that..all meters are calibrated to 18% gray..
Hence if one uses spot meter on a white color subject for reference..may not be able to get white correctly..
 

milkydude

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#9
how does AE lock work in different metering modes.

when to acturely use AE lock
 

blazer_workz

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#10
how does AE lock work in different metering modes.

when to acturely use AE lock
AE lock means auto exposure lock..
its use for locking exposure when in P, A or S modes..in these modes, exposure is automatically determine by camera..so that u can recompose with the exposure setting u want..
 

Oct 26, 2008
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Yishun.
#12
AE lock means auto exposure lock..
its use for locking exposure when in P, A or S modes..in these modes, exposure is automatically determine by camera..so that u can recompose with the exposure setting u want..
oh? i was under the impression that AE/L can be used even in manual mode?

anyways just a query here, lets just say i go out and get a "grey-card".
basically the concept is to meter the card within the scene i intend to shoot.
lock the EV. compose and fire away?
 

blazer_workz

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#13
oh? i was under the impression that AE/L can be used even in manual mode?
When in manual mode..ur metering won't fluctuate the settings(aperture and shutter)..it depends on what settings u have set..

anyways just a query here, lets just say i go out and get a "grey-card".
basically the concept is to meter the card within the scene i intend to shoot.
lock the EV. compose and fire away?
theoretically yes..but who cares, we are in digital age..shoot, review and reshoot..:bsmilie:
 

#14
depends...just give it a try. Using a camera like the K20D for events, conventional theory goes out the door.
You need to read more.... Most Flash are tuned to simulate sunlight... measure at 5300~5800 depending on which model and make is your flash.

Conventional Theory DOES NOT GO OUT THE DOOR! My guess is that most people don't have a good basic on their knowledge on their equipment, Understanding of Exposure and White Balance and eventually come up with their own concoction to shooting. Well it works...sometimes

However, if you trace back to all those correctly exposed shots (Not metered correctly shots but Histogram correct shots by and large not meaning off skwelled shots). you will notice that all goes back to correctly metering the mid-tone.

Cheers!
 

Last edited:
Oct 26, 2008
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Yishun.
#15
When in manual mode..ur metering won't fluctuate the settings(aperture and shutter)..it depends on what settings u have set..
so okay, hmm lets say.. i want to take a picture of someone with the sunset in the background. would i then be correct to say, i meter the sky. lock the EV. then compose the picture with the inclusion of my subject. but at the same time use a flash to properly expose the subject? would this be correct?
 

blazer_workz

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#16
so okay, hmm lets say.. i want to take a picture of someone with the sunset in the background. would i then be correct to say, i meter the sky. lock the EV. then compose the picture with the inclusion of my subject. but at the same time use a flash to properly expose the subject? would this be correct?
try it out..
u learn best if u have hands on..:)
 

megaweb

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#18
i want to take a picture of someone with the sunset in the background. would i then be correct to say, i meter the sky. lock the EV. then compose the picture with the inclusion of my subject. but at the same time use a flash to properly expose the subject? would this be correct?
Yes, you can meter the sky but you need to increase your flash exposure FE.
 

night86mare

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Aug 25, 2006
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#19
depends...just give it a try. Using a camera like the K20D for events, conventional theory goes out the door.
its pretty simple...if the white balance can be easily done, centre-weighted is recommended. If so difficult till eventually just leave on auto, use spot metering.
荒唐 :bsmilie::bsmilie::bsmilie:
 

Leong23

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Oct 18, 2007
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#20
its pretty simple...if the white balance can be easily done, centre-weighted is recommended. If so difficult till eventually just leave on auto, use spot metering.
TS is asking question pertaining to Exposure Value (EV), not Colour temperature (kelvins), either you are confused, or you trying to confuse others.
 

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