Malay guy strucky by lightning when using HP.


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revenant

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#1
Anyone watched the news yesterday?

A malay guy using his HP walks from bus-stop to Paya Lebar MRT under the rain and was struck by lightning. Lots of blood :eek:

Condolences to his family.
 

fusetrips

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Jan 17, 2002
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#3
Gurkhas are foreign talents right?
 

D

dRe

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#4
Gurkhas are excellent soldiers.

It is really to sad to have this kind of thing happening in Singapore. :(
 

Ian

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Feb 20, 2002
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#5
Originally posted by fusetrips
Gurkhas are foreign talents right?
They are from Nepal and have been serving in the British Army (which is where Singapore got the idea to hire Gurkhas from) for at least 100 years.
 

#6
Be careful about handphones in petrol stations as well. Some time ago, a Brasilian was at a petrol station when his handphone rang, the thing triggered a fire and explosion. The Nokia manual explicitly warns against using the phone at such places as well. How the hell it happen, I don't know. :dunno:

So, turn off your handphones when at a petrol station, or when you are in a highly flammable area.

Regards
CK
 

J

JaDe

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#7
Maybe his time's up...
SigH~
 

roygoh

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Jan 18, 2002
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#8
How is the lightning strike being linked to his using the handphone? I thought anyone walking in the rain when there is lightning will stand equal chance of getting hit regardless of whether he is using the handphone or not. If there is any scientific explanation to prove me wrong I would be interested to read about that.

Some time ago, I read a chain email saying that lightning can travel on the radio wave the handphone is sending. A "first person" account even stated that he saw the bolt of lightning travelling towards him from the sky and he managed to turn of his handphone just before the lightning bolt reached him, and managed to escape the fatal shock.

I am totally unconvinced by this story. Lightning travelling on EM wave?

ckiang's warning against using the handphone at petrol stations is a valid one, though.

In the US, there are also warnings against getting in and out of your vehicle when you are filling up at a petrol stataion. At low humidity places, getting in and out of the car will generate static electricity on your body. When you touch the outer body of the car, you will get an electro-static discharge. The electric arc is capable of inginiting the petrol fume around the car. These warnings can be seen at every petrol station that I have been to.
 

J

JaDe

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#9
Eh the kite wit the key hanging on it "theory" ?
 

#10
Originally posted by JaDe
Eh the kite wit the key hanging on it "theory" ?
That's not theory, that's Benjamin Franklin's highly dangerous experiment. In this case, there is a conductor - the kite and wet string. Whether you are using a handphone or not does not affect your chances of being struck by lightning, like Roy said. That poor guy just so happen to be using one.

Regards
CK
 

Goondu

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Jan 18, 2002
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#11
Originally posted by roygoh
How is the lightning strike being linked to his using the handphone? I thought anyone walking in the rain when there is lightning will stand equal chance of getting hit regardless of whether he is using the handphone or not. If there is any scientific explanation to prove me wrong I would be interested to read about that.

Some time ago, I read a chain email saying that lightning can travel on the radio wave the handphone is sending. A "first person" account even stated that he saw the bolt of lightning travelling towards him from the sky and he managed to turn of his handphone just before the lightning bolt reached him, and managed to escape the fatal shock.

I am totally unconvinced by this story. Lightning travelling on EM wave?

ckiang's warning against using the handphone at petrol stations is a valid one, though. .....

I am unconvinced also. How fast does lightning travel compare with the hp being switched off? And the most natural instinct is to throw away the hp, rather then switching off.
 

roygoh

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#12
Originally posted by Goondu


I am unconvinced also. How fast does lightning travel compare with the hp being switched off? And the most natural instinct is to throw away the hp, rather then switching off.
Sorry, but I don't think you will have enough time to react at all if a lightning bolt decides to come your way. Most likely you will not even get to see it coming...;)
 

maddog

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Feb 13, 2002
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#13
Lightning travels from the bottom of a negatively charged thunder cloud to the closest positively charged point on earth. So if there's lightning, don't walk on an overhead bridge.

Lightning conductors are designed to dissipate lightning strikes. It carries positively charged particles and dispenses them upwards into the sky thereby dissipating the charge difference.

This site features photographs on weather.
WeatherStock
 

Tweek

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Jan 17, 2002
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#14
Originally posted by ckiang
Be careful about handphones in petrol stations as well. Some time ago, a Brasilian was at a petrol station when his handphone rang, the thing triggered a fire and explosion. The Nokia manual explicitly warns against using the phone at such places as well. How the hell it happen, I don't know. :dunno:

So, turn off your handphones when at a petrol station, or when you are in a highly flammable area.

Regards
CK
this happened a few times, there was a case in Hong Kong about 1 to 2 years back too. But I still see some people bochup here...using hp like nobody's business in petrol stations.
 

#15
Originally posted by Goondu


I am unconvinced also. How fast does lightning travel compare with the hp being switched off? And the most natural instinct is to throw away the hp, rather then switching off.
Yeah man, and we all know how fast light /electricity travels.

Regards
CK
 

roygoh

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#16
From what I read on www.zaobao.com, eyewitness claimed that the police found the handphone in the victim's pocket. So he might not be using the handphone when he was hit.

Also, the lightning did not hit the victim directly. It struck on the ground near to him. The potential difference between the 2 spots his legs were standing on were great enough though, to send a current through his body and killed him.
 

sbs99

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Jan 17, 2002
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#17
Maybe the handphone was ringing and he didnt hear? and got zapped. :p
 

J

JaDe

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#18
Eh yep learned bout tat in pri. skoo...make things simple mahz...
Anyway millions of people STILL DO talk on phone on rainy days indoors n outdoors...well all coincidental n maybe his time's up...
 

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