Macro setup


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Minerva

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May 7, 2009
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#1
Hi! I have a question about the macro setup... I would like to know what does in means in the following setup?

- Camera + Normal lens + Coupling Ring + Reversed prime lens (for macro > 1:1 )
- Camera + Reverse Lens Adapter + Reversed lens (for macro > 1:1 )

quoted from : http://www.clubsnap.com/forums/showthread.php?t=261356

How to mount a "reverse prim lense"? Not sure about how the reverse lense thing works...

I have a nikon 18-55mm VR, and a AF 50mm 1.8D. How can I go about the setup?

My friend borrowed my a micro nikon 105mm VR and I was starting to have an interest in macro. However, i found the 105mm maybe still not as close-up... Maybe a 200mm will be good :cool:

So doesn't the mentioned set-up be feastible?

Sorry, quite a newbie here. :bsmilie:
 

Gengh

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May 6, 2007
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#2
I suppose you're referring to the first method you listed. For that, I'll refer you to this video: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=M1pMO7Jy7KI. You can see him dismantle his reversed 50mm prime, followed by the coupling ring, so it should be pretty clear. In the video, the "normal lens" mounted is a 100mm prime, but you can use your kit lens at 50-55mm without any problems (I suppose). It should be just right for 1:1 macro.

Not a Nikon user myself, but I don't think the Nikon 200mm macro lens will give you more "close up" shots than the 105mm macro lens. Most macro lenses (without any external modifiers) are designed for 1:1 magnification, which means the subject will be imaged life-size onto the sensor. 200mm just allows you to stay further away, and still get 1:1 magnification. If you want to get more "close up" than 1:1, then you'll need to use extension tubes, reverse a wider lens in front of a longer lens, or reverse a wide-angle lens directly onto the body.

Hope the previous paragraph didn't confuse you more. Go try things out with your current gear and it should get clearer. :)
 

ortega

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Nov 2, 2004
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#3
Gengh is right the nikkor 105mm has a magnification of 1:1 and so does the 200mm
in order to get more than 1:1 you can do a few things

1. extension tubes
2. teleconverter
3. bellows
4. closeup filter
 

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Minerva

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#4
Oh i understand. Actually went the take butterfoy... I think 105mm doesn't allow good clearance distance in very good macro without any modifier. stalked the butterflys and it actually flies away when I'm like 1.5 to 2m away. :(

Ok, I understand the use of the reverse prime lense now.. Is there any way to protect the rear element when in reverse mount? I heard that's a bayonet-to-52mm thread adaptor fitting which allows you to fit a filter over the rear element. Anyone?
 

Galdor

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#5
Oh i understand. Actually went the take butterfoy... I think 105mm doesn't allow good clearance distance in very good macro without any modifier. stalked the butterflys and it actually flies away when I'm like 1.5 to 2m away. :(

Ok, I understand the use of the reverse prime lense now.. Is there any way to protect the rear element when in reverse mount? I heard that's a bayonet-to-52mm thread adaptor fitting which allows you to fit a filter over the rear element. Anyone?
I have ever taken a shot of a butterfly with a 50mm lens. Usually they will fly off when you are near hence most people will go for the 150mm or 180mm macro lens.
 

Minerva

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#6
another question is.... how is the magnification ratio of a 50mm or 18-55mm lense fitted with a raynox dcr250? I understand it's not a true macro (1:1), but how does stand? 1:X? Rough gauge? I'm thinking of getting a cheaper alternative setup once i return my friend the 105mm micro nikon.

Also, the min focusing distance of a 50mm lense is unchanged with raynox fitted for example izzit correct? So it doesn't allows me to stand far for the subject just like dedicated macro 55mm lense?
 

Galdor

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Jul 5, 2006
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#7
another question is.... how is the magnification ratio of a 50mm or 18-55mm lense fitted with a raynox dcr250? I understand it's not a true macro (1:1), but how does stand? 1:X? Rough gauge? I'm thinking of getting a cheaper alternative setup once i return my friend the 105mm micro nikon.

Also, the min focusing distance of a 50mm lense is unchanged with raynox fitted for example izzit correct? So it doesn't allows me to stand far for the subject just like dedicated macro 55mm lense?
I'm not sure what is the magnification ratio but it allows you to focus very close to the subject. Using the Raynox on your kit lens may cause vignetting too.
 

Gengh

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May 6, 2007
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#8
another question is.... how is the magnification ratio of a 50mm or 18-55mm lense fitted with a raynox dcr250? I understand it's not a true macro (1:1), but how does stand? 1:X? Rough gauge? I'm thinking of getting a cheaper alternative setup once i return my friend the 105mm micro nikon.

Also, the min focusing distance of a 50mm lense is unchanged with raynox fitted for example izzit correct? So it doesn't allows me to stand far for the subject just like dedicated macro 55mm lense?
You can do a rough calculation like this (same for close-up filters):

Raynox is +8 dioptre, that means it's equivalent to a 125mm lens.

MAXIMUM working distance will be roughly 125mm (12.5cm), regardless of the lens you mount it on. Minimum working distance will depend on the lens you mount it on.

When mounted on a 50mm lens, the MINIMUM magnification will be roughly 50:125, or 1:2.5. Maximum magnification will again depend on the lens you mount it on.
 

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