Long exposure's setting


fatBozZ

New Member
Jun 5, 2010
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#1
Hi Bros & Sis,
i've been doing long exposure shots for quite sometime, usually is about 1 min > shot (Wif the aid of ND110 ND filter)
something is confusing me,

1) If i am shooting a architecture Landscape, my f/Stop should be f16-18 or just crank it all the way to f22-32 ?
2) If it is f/16-f18 will my background be a little bit out of focus compare to my foreground ?
3) Should i use auto or manual focus ? Or should i just turn it to infinity focus ?


:( help appreciated ... Thanks
 

giantcanopy

Senior Member
Feb 11, 2007
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#2
1) If i am shooting a architecture Landscape, my f/Stop should be f16-18 or just crank it all the way to f22-32 ?

You need to read up and understand the use of stopping down aperture, and the ill effects of diffraction as aperture gets smaller and smaller.

2) If it is f/16-f18 will my background be a little bit out of focus compare to my foreground ?

It depends on where you focus, but in general the smaller the aperture the greater the depth of field.

3) Should i use auto or manual focus ? Or should i just turn it to infinity focus ?

Auto or manual focus will do as long as they do the job.
Infinity focus is not the solution to all your landscape shooting, you can try reading up on hyperfocal distance. I usually just focus approx 1/3 into the scene.

Ryan
 

bruggink

New Member
Jul 2, 2008
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#3
Hi Bros & Sis,
i've been doing long exposure shots for quite sometime, usually is about 1 min > shot (Wif the aid of ND110 ND filter)
something is confusing me,

1) If i am shooting a architecture Landscape, my f/Stop should be f16-18 or just crank it all the way to f22-32 ?
2) If it is f/16-f18 will my background be a little bit out of focus compare to my foreground ?
3) Should i use auto or manual focus ? Or should i just turn it to infinity focus ?


:( help appreciated ... Thanks
1) At smaller apertures you will suffer loss of definition caused by diffraction. Personally, I shoot landscape at f16, rarely at f22. But then again, it is recommended that you shoot at different f-stops to see the differences yourself.

2) It may be difficult to comment on this point w/o providing a sample pic. You can read up on hyperfocal distance and learn how to focus at the right spot to bring the background to focus.

3) Manual focus. Mount the camera on a tripod (I think this is an understatement for long exposure photography), take an exposure reading first with your camera in auto focus mode. Switch your camera to manual mode with manual focus and put on your filter. Activate the shutter with a cable release or via timer to minimise camera shakes.

Anyone feel free to correct me if i'm wrong.
 

rhino123

Moderator
Staff member
Sep 1, 2006
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#4
A search in the google yield great number of results.


http://www.digital-photography-school.com/architectural-photography

To retain detail throughout the scene plump for a small aperture (large f stop) such as f14, alternatively try throwing out the sharpness of either the foreground or background by choosing a large aperture (small f stop).
 

fatBozZ

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Jun 5, 2010
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#5
Thank you so much for all your tips and tricks ... hopefully i can bring u guys some good pics ....
 

Edwin Francis

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Mar 24, 2006
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#6
1)
3) Manual focus. Mount the camera on a tripod (I think this is an understatement for long exposure photography), take an exposure reading first with your camera in auto focus mode. Switch your camera to manual mode with manual focus and put on your filter. Activate the shutter with a cable release or via timer to minimise camera shakes.
Anyone feel free to correct me if i'm wrong.
Errr... out of curiosity, what's the rationale behind switching to AF to take a meter reading? Surely AF/MF is irrelevant for metering?

You're right about diffraction issues of course.

TS, there ain't no magic settings -- others have pointed out the diffraction issues at small apertures, but for 2) nobody can tell without a SPECIFIC situation. Use your DOF preview or calculate (if you really want to be 'precise').
MF or AF both work, and will depend on a) the specific situation, b) your preferred method of working.

Please don't get hung up on finding the 'ideal' method of working, settings, etc. Try different things out and find out what works FOR YOU.
 

bruggink

New Member
Jul 2, 2008
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#7
Errr... out of curiosity, what's the rationale behind switching to AF to take a meter reading? Surely AF/MF is irrelevant for metering?
Pardon me for not being precise in my explanation. I've tried manual focus and the results, sometimes good and sometimes bad (especially when you are trying long exposures under freaking cold environment). I find using AF first and manually input the exposure settings the fastest way, at least to me. Over time, it has become a habit to me. I guess there are many ways so I just picked one that floats my boat. :)
 

dandoodle

New Member
Apr 27, 2011
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#8
Pardon me for not being precise in my explanation. I've tried manual focus and the results, sometimes good and sometimes bad (especially when you are trying long exposures under freaking cold environment). I find using AF first and manually input the exposure settings the fastest way, at least to me. Over time, it has become a habit to me. I guess there are many ways so I just picked one that floats my boat. :)
Correct me if I'm wrong, we need to get obtain the exposure time w/o the filter as you mentioned in Aperture priority mode, then multiply the figure by 2^10 (or 1024) for the 10 stop ND Filter that FatBoZz is using and set that in manual mode using the same Aperture used in Aperture Priority mode?
 

bruggink

New Member
Jul 2, 2008
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#9
Correct me if I'm wrong, we need to get obtain the exposure time w/o the filter as you mentioned in Aperture priority mode, then multiply the figure by 2^10 (or 1024) for the 10 stop ND Filter that FatBoZz is using and set that in manual mode using the same Aperture used in Aperture Priority mode?
Yup.. tats right.
 

chiangkxv

Senior Member
Jul 5, 2008
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#10
Hi Bros & Sis,
i've been doing long exposure shots for quite sometime, usually is about 1 min > shot (Wif the aid of ND110 ND filter)
something is confusing me,

1) If i am shooting a architecture Landscape, my f/Stop should be f16-18 or just crank it all the way to f22-32 ?
2) If it is f/16-f18 will my background be a little bit out of focus compare to my foreground ?
3) Should i use auto or manual focus ? Or should i just turn it to infinity focus ?


:( help appreciated ... Thanks
1. Use any aperture to get your required exposure time. But do bear in mind diffraction when using very small aperture which may affect sharpness.
2. Learn to use hyper focal distance.
3. Same as #2
 

chiangkxv

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Jul 5, 2008
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#11
Correct me if I'm wrong, we need to get obtain the exposure time w/o the filter as you mentioned in Aperture priority mode, then multiply the figure by 2^10 (or 1024) for the 10 stop ND Filter that FatBoZz is using and set that in manual mode using the same Aperture used in Aperture Priority mode?
Actually. with the implementation of live view, that is not necessary. Though i still have the habit of doing so.
 

Cowseye

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Mar 7, 2010
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#12
chiangkxv said:
Actually. with the implementation of live view, that is not necessary. Though i still have the habit of doing so.
You still can't do with 10 stop filter and required exposure longer than 30 seconds. You will still get pitch black on lv.
 

chiangkxv

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Jul 5, 2008
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#13
Cowseye said:
You still can't do with 10 stop filter and required exposure longer than 30 seconds. You will still get pitch black on lv.
I'm not sure why you say so, but I'm still able to see in bulb mode. But That is when I'm outdoor with sufficient light.
 

kei1309

Senior Member
Apr 12, 2010
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#15
You still can't do with 10 stop filter and required exposure longer than 30 seconds. You will still get pitch black on lv.
i compose, get the shutter speed, screw on the filter and re-calculate my final shutter speed... and that works for me
 

GRbenji

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May 24, 2010
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#16
I'm not sure why you say so, but I'm still able to see in bulb mode. But That is when I'm outdoor with sufficient light.
Why qualified your statement? What if insufficient light and exposure exceed 30s? How do you know how long to keep it in bulb mode if you don't calculate?
 

chiangkxv

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#17
GRbenji said:
Why qualified your statement? What if insufficient light and exposure exceed 30s? How do you know how long to keep it in bulb mode if you don't calculate?
Usually i'll take note of the aperture value for correct exposure with 30s exposure, then switch to bulb make necessary compensation to get the exposure time I want.

If there is insufficient light for LV to work, then most probably you won't need the nd filter unless you are doing 1/2 an hour kind of exposure.
 

Cowseye

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#18
kei1309 said:
i compose, get the shutter speed, screw on the filter and re-calculate my final shutter speed... and that works for me
That works for me too. The lv with filter on trick didn't.
@chiangkxv: If a 10 stop filter is the only ND filter you have at that moment, Bo bian have to use that if u need to achieve slow shutter right?
 

Last edited:

Omahom

New Member
Dec 14, 2010
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#19
i compose, get the shutter speed, screw on the filter and re-calculate my final shutter speed... and that works for me
There is an app which can be downloaded onto your iphone that will caluclate for you. Its called the Longtime Exposure Calculator. Go to the apps store and get it. Its free.
 

ZerocoolAstra

Senior Member
Mar 13, 2008
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#20
Omahom said:
There is an app which can be downloaded onto your iphone that will caluclate for you. Its called the Longtime Exposure Calculator. Go to the apps store and get it. Its free.
Wah, multiply by 8 or 64 or 1000 also need app har? Siao liao la...

All return to maths teacher liao? :)
 

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