Loctite your camera plate


May 11, 2008
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#1
Anyone loctite their camera plates? As my camera plate will be used not just only for tripod but as well as with black rapid and a handstrap, i am considering this option as the camera plate will be "well used". My concern is that i have never used loctite (blue) before and not sure if there will be any unsightly residue left after i remove it.
 

agws1970

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#2
Anyone loctite their camera plates? As my camera plate will be used not just only for tripod but as well as with black rapid and a handstrap, i am considering this option as the camera plate will be "well used". My concern is that i have never used loctite (blue) before and not sure if there will be any unsightly residue left after i remove it.
Do not loctite the plate to the body unless you want to permanently have the plate on with no chance of removal. You need access to the bottom plate when servicing is due or when anything goes loose in the camera. It is the first point of entry.
 

qystan

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#3
TigerOyster said:
Anyone loctite their camera plates? As my camera plate will be used not just only for tripod but as well as with black rapid and a handstrap, i am considering this option as the camera plate will be "well used". My concern is that i have never used loctite (blue) before and not sure if there will be any unsightly residue left after i remove it.
Consider carefully. Although it is so called not permanent, it may not come off without damaging something. if it is a good practice, it would have been recommended by the manufacturer.

Heating softens the stuff for removal and probably melts the camera
 

Last edited:
May 11, 2008
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#5
Do not loctite the plate to the body unless you want to permanently have the plate on with no chance of removal. You need access to the bottom plate when servicing is due or when anything goes loose in the camera. It is the first point of entry.
Consider carefully. Although it is so called not permanent, it may not come off without damaging something. if it is a good practice, it would have been recommended by the manufacturer.

Heating softens the stuff for removal and probably melts the camera
Thanks for your constructive advice guys :)
 

giantcanopy

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Feb 11, 2007
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#6
TigerOyster said:
Anyone loctite their camera plates? As my camera plate will be used not just only for tripod but as well as with black rapid and a handstrap, i am considering this option as the camera plate will be "well used". My concern is that i have never used loctite (blue) before and not sure if there will be any unsightly residue left after i remove it.
If your camera model has no built in battery grip compartment, your sealing of the plate means you cannot add a grip physically.
 

sinned79

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Jun 18, 2009
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#7
If your camera model has no built in battery grip compartment, your sealing of the plate means you cannot add a grip physically.
dat's why i say dumb and lazy idea.

dumb = never though by doing this will means no more battery grip can be added.
lazy = cos lazy to fix and unfix the camera plate?
 

May 11, 2008
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#8
If your camera model has no built in battery grip compartment, your sealing of the plate means you cannot add a grip physically.
You got a good point, but i am not a battery grip person. The camera plate is already there 100% of the time for the handstrap and for my tripod and it does not come out at all. Of course, i do have to cater for contingencies and the future such as repairs or when i want to sell it and thus i thought about loctite as they claimed to have a non permanent version which can be unfastened using normal hand tools. My lack of experience on loctite prompted me to start this thread to know more about the product to see if it is indeed feasible and was hoping for some feedback from someone who has actual hands on with loctite.
 

jonathann

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Jul 12, 2009
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#9
Get anything that is from low to medium strength. Do not use the high strength loctite. Apply on the screw thread. There shouldnt be any residues if you do not over apply.
 

May 11, 2008
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#10
Get anything that is from low to medium strength. Do not use the high strength loctite. Apply on the screw thread. There shouldnt be any residues if you do not over apply.
I got the 243 aka loctite blue, supposedly medium strength. Now waiting for some other stuff to arrive before embarking on a mini project. Probably i will just try it out on a simple bolt and nut to see the result.
 

daredevil123

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Oct 25, 2005
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#11
as long is you screw the plate tight, you should have no problems. No need for Loctite.

The plate is the least of your problems when using straps like black rapid...
 

giantcanopy

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Feb 11, 2007
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#12
TigerOyster said:
You got a good point, but i am not a battery grip person. The camera plate is already there 100% of the time for the handstrap and for my tripod and it does not come out at all. Of course, i do have to cater for contingencies and the future such as repairs or when i want to sell it and thus i thought about loctite as they claimed to have a non permanent version which can be unfastened using normal hand tools. My lack of experience on loctite prompted me to start this thread to know more about the product to see if it is indeed feasible and was hoping for some feedback from someone who has actual hands on with loctite.
Some years back, I used to want to try change the lock mechanism of my Markins ballhead, but after reading up on the need to clamp, hammer and blowtorch to loosen the up the loctite I gave up the idea.

I understand why such you would come to the idea to hardseal the plate. There were infrequent times where my plate loosened and start to rotate, especially in sub freezing temperatures. But I also always carry the hex key with me to troubleshoot such problems.

Along with the apparent convenience of sealing comes the inconveniences that others suggested.

Happy shooting, irregardless.

Ryan
 

May 11, 2008
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#13
as long is you screw the plate tight, you should have no problems. No need for Loctite.

The plate is the least of your problems when using straps like black rapid...
I already have the BR portion covered :)
Just a bit paranoid when the fate of a few thousand dollars now lies on one hole instead of 2 previously. Thought of the new kirk L plate which has another bolt secured to one of the camera strap holes but decided against it due to size.
 

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May 11, 2008
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#14
Some years back, I used to want to try change the lock mechanism of my Markins ballhead, but after reading up on the need to clamp, hammer and blowtorch to loosen the up the loctite I gave up the idea.

I understand why such you would come to the idea to hardseal the plate. There were infrequent times where my plate loosened and start to rotate, especially in sub freezing temperatures. But I also always carry the hex key with me to troubleshoot such problems.

Along with the apparent convenience of sealing comes the inconveniences that others suggested.

Happy shooting, irregardless.

Ryan
Your markins case could be using the permanent loctite, i'm not sure :) . Anyway i will most likely test it out on a spare bolt and nut once all my stuff arrive for the benefit Of those who may be interested to know
 

NewbieInCS

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Jun 11, 2009
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#15
Pardon me for saying this, but loctite camera plate to camera is just plain stupid. High chance of removal issue in the future. I work with loctite on a regular basis on my other hobby. Even then, I try not to use it on my toys when not needed...

Chop plus stamp will leave some residue on the screw threads. Basically the liquid that you apply will dry out and that is what stops the screw from coming loose.

If you really want to try, just apply 1 drop on the screw thread, then use your finger to spread that drop around the screw thread. 1 drop is more than enough liao.

This is not an environment with high vibration that is prone to loose screw.

Just using an hex wrench to tighten the screw moderately is more than sufficient.
 

daredevil123

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Oct 25, 2005
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#16
TS, I would strongly suggest you use a Loctite that is low strength, maybe a Loctite 222. If you use Loctite 243/242 you will find removing the plate very difficult. And if you use Loctite 263 and above, all I can say is good luck!
 

May 11, 2008
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#17
TS, I would strongly suggest you use a Loctite that is low strength, maybe a Loctite 222. If you use Loctite 243/242 you will find removing the plate very difficult. And if you use Loctite 263 and above, all I can say is good luck!
Noted with thanks :)
 

Kit

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#18
Loctite comes in different grade but its an overkill thing to do with plates. Don't do something only to regret later on.....
 

yilin

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Jul 24, 2004
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#19
Hi TS,

Not a very good idea to use that any thermosetting agent , once the chemical crosslinking is completed you will have trouble removing it. Unless your intention is permanent fix.

Else, just simply by wrapping the thread with some sealing tape ( used for water pipes) that would help to minimise the loosening of the screw .
 

daredevil123

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Oct 25, 2005
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lil red dot
#20
Hi TS,

Not a very good idea to use that any thermosetting agent , once the chemical crosslinking is completed you will have trouble removing it. Unless your intention is permanent fix.

Else, just simply by wrapping the thread with some sealing tape ( used for water pipes) that would help to minimise the loosening of the screw .
Yes, teflon tape is a very good option.
 

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