lobang for printing photography book


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May 8, 2006
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#1
Hi all... other than fotohub, is there any place i can make photo books with hard cover?
 

emotic

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Jul 5, 2007
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#4
thanks for the reply... usually how long do i need to wait for the ready product?
About a week or so, might be longer for peak periods. Good customer service from my experience. They'll try to deliver your order early if they can. You can drop by their showroom at DhobyXchange too, to find out more.
 

scenar

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Aug 23, 2005
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#8
I have a question: for these companies that print books, how do we know if the prints (books) we get are calibrated to our screens? calibrating our screens alone wont mean much, as we'll still need te ICC profile of the printers right?
 

Clown

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Mar 24, 2003
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#9
I have a question: for these companies that print books, how do we know if the prints (books) we get are calibrated to our screens? calibrating our screens alone wont mean much, as we'll still need te ICC profile of the printers right?
just calibrate your monitor to 5000k and use sRGB. that should give you a match of 90%.
 

#10
About a week or so, might be longer for peak periods. Good customer service from my experience. They'll try to deliver your order early if they can. You can drop by their showroom at DhobyXchange too, to find out more.
Hi Emo, thank you for remembering. It'd been awhile, must buy you coffee on your next visit:cool: We’ve improved to deliver within a week or 5 working days, currently averaging 4 working days. For trade professionals’ coffee table books too.:sweat:

I have a question: for these companies that print books, how do we know if the prints (books) we get are calibrated to our screens? calibrating our screens alone wont mean much, as we'll still need te ICC profile of the printers right?
Just profile to SWOP, Euroscale or Japan Colors standard, these values are found in Photoshop. If you can match, most print vendors can achieve 95%+. Print vendors usually calibrate and match to one of these standards, none can match to your screen or any other screens. It's simply impractical. The question is: Are you calibrating correctly and matching to one of these print standards?

Look at consistency in your images, check for grey balance on your monitor. Use this step-guide: http://www.clubsnap.com/forums/showpost.php?p=5015491&postcount=8

just calibrate your monitor to 5000k and use sRGB. that should give you a match of 90%.
“99% don’t really care while the 1% struggle with perfection.” :think:
 

emotic

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Jul 5, 2007
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#11
Hi Emo, thank you for remembering. It'd been awhile, must buy you coffee on your next visit:cool: We’ve improved to deliver within a week or 5 working days, currently averaging 4 working days. For trade professionals’ coffee table books too.:sweat:
No prob Winson. That's cool, looking forward to order more books from you.

Anyway, you have PM.
 

EOS3618

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Aug 14, 2009
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#12
Hi all... other than fotohub, is there any place i can make photo books with hard cover?
not very sure. but not all places provides photobook in very good quality.. I see some that gives low quality prints.
 

limwhow

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Jun 9, 2009
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#13
just calibrate your monitor to 5000k and use sRGB. that should give you a match of 90%.
At Cathay Photo, where I bought my Spyder 3 from, the sales person asked me to calibrate to 6500k at 2.2 for all Mac and Windows computers. Is this setting ok for printing photobooks, or must we still use 5000K?
 

Clown

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Mar 24, 2003
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#14
Industrial standard is D50, or 5000k.
But nowadays it's relatively safe to calibrate anywhere between 5000k and 6500k.
problem with 6500k will be a slightly warmer print result if you're gonna outsource your printing to pro printing houses.

winson can help to verify on this?
 

Nikonnew

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May 31, 2005
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#15
try www.albumstories.com - delivery normally within 1 week
I have tried this one, but do try to choose glossy surface as it gives you more vibrant colors and sharper image . I did one album in matt and the resulting image ws quite dull and not so sharp, ....maybe iit was my photos, i dont know.:bsmilie:
 

limwhow

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Jun 9, 2009
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#16
Anyone tried Photobook Singapore before? Any opinion on this company? No offence to Just1book, but just want to ask for opinions from others about this Photobook Singapore. Thanks.
 

#17
Industrial standard is D50, or 5000k.
But nowadays it's relatively safe to calibrate anywhere between 5000k and 6500k.
problem with 6500k will be a slightly warmer print result if you're gonna outsource your printing to pro printing houses.

winson can help to verify on this?
I belonged to the old school of users with knowledge on CRT (tube) and prints (CMYK). Today’s flat-panel LCD monitors are very affordable and good. Hence, most of us do not talk about temperature, gamma, etc. Most of us don’t even bother to calibrate unless there’s a need to do image retouching, this source of work or income had been render obsolete with files supplied ready to print. Colour-separation and colour retouching as a trade is dead. In a printing environment, most of the lights are florescent tube, around 2500K to 3500K. The only light at the press or viewing table is 5000K, or we call it “daylight”.

If you are into video or want to watch a movie with your monitor, you can set to 6500K to 9300K. Images are bluer and brighter.

But if you were going to prints, I would recommend a white point of 5000K with a gamma of 2.2. If you have been viewing uncalibrated display, your initial reaction upon performing your first monitor calibration will likely be, “Oops!….. what did I do wrong?”. Does it make sense to calibrate a monitor to have a dull screen? If you are doing it correctly, a properly calibrated LCD display will look dark and flat with a rather warm colour balance. I’m been conservative and realistic, as everyone expect to have prints like what they would see on their monitors. RGB vs CMYK.

There are two camps...6500K and 5000K, bluer or cooler and yellower or warmer. Those using the latter are mainly concerned with matching prints that they're viewing under a 5000K viewing box.

I wound not recommend 6500K to photographers. My sense is that he is not working in a fully profiled environment and is still relying on last minute visual tweaks to match.

Anyway, you have the freedom to decide what setting works for you, but remember: don't expect the colours you match and edited under your "6500K colour calibrated screen" to behave the same way in the rest of the world which are closer to 5000 K than 6500 K. Be careful with your suppliers, clients and people like me.;)
 

limwhow

Senior Member
Jun 9, 2009
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#18
Thank you so much Winsonapm for your detail explanation. So in summary, if I were to prepare my photos for printing with a commercial printer like Just1Book or even for printing using my own printer, it would be ideal to calibrate to 5000K. That is right?
 

#19
Thank you so much Winsonapm for your detail explanation. So in summary, if I were to prepare my photos for printing with a commercial printer like Just1Book or even for printing using my own printer, it would be ideal to calibrate to 5000K. That is right?
Yes, it's better to set a lower and warmer setting. :thumbsup: More realistic and easier to match the paper and ink profile. You'll get to profile your printer too. ;):)
 

#20
Anyone tried Photobook Singapore before? Any opinion on this company? No offence to Just1book, but just want to ask for opinions from others about this Photobook Singapore. Thanks.
No offence taken. Same application, same machine, almost same paper and price, etc.
The only difference is, we've a showroom at DhobyX and a production facility in Singapore.:)
 

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