Little Spiderhunter and Crimson Sunbird


Status
Not open for further replies.

skfoo

Senior Member
Mar 15, 2003
1,312
0
36
Visit site
These images were taken in November last year.
I was caught in the rain at Mandai Orchid Garden. Even in the rain, these birds continue to collect nectar from the plant. The natural lighting was far from good but the actions/presence of the birds were simply too tempting for me that I have to take some shots. I shot in manual and used the combination of shutter speed and aperture to freeze the actions while showing some green colour in the background. These shots turned out somewhat underexposed (I won’t show them ;) ) as I did not change the setting (not that I have much choice) when the natural lights went down. However, having shot in RAW, using today’s technology in noise reduction and Photoshop CS, these images are able to see daylight again. Not the best of shots but they could have been deleted shots.

They looked like shots taken in a studio don’t they?






Some raindrop fell on the head of the crimson sunbird, at 100% the raindrop is still obvious!




All shots taken with Nikon D1H, AFS500mmf4DII+TC-14EII, ISO400, 1/125@f/5.6.

Comments are welcome.
 

Garion

Senior Member
Nov 26, 2002
5,526
0
0
46
West side of S'pore
Visit site
SK,

Good shots there. I like the last one especially, good composition. :thumbsup: The flash really brings out the colours of this bugger.
 

skfoo

Senior Member
Mar 15, 2003
1,312
0
36
Visit site
Madcat II/Garion/Harlequin,

Thanks for the comments and compliments. ;)

oeyvind,

Thanks for the comment.

The point raised could be solved by leveling. Lowering the level will reduce the overall brightness but green background will become closer to black. I prefer the image this way. A point to note, these images were originally underexposed.

I also used white/grey feathers as guide. They should not be overexposed and should retain details within them.

agape01,

Having fun with the IDmk2? ;)

I shoot RAW all the time not because I want to color correct them later. All of us would like to get the exposure spot on so that less time is spent on post-processing (nightmare!). Imagine having to post-process images when the body is already tired from a tough day shooting and eyes closing.

Shoot in RAW is like a safety net for me. As long as the images are not overly underexposed or overexposed (the histogram will tell you that), there is still a chance to salvage these images (if shot in film, these images will go straight into the bin). Plus technology keep on getting better, we are able to extract more and more from images shot in RAW.

Joe McDonald (who uses Canon) recommends it too (in his workshop conducted in Singapore recently). Check-out the following link to his website on shooting in RAW.

http://www.hoothollow.com/Question-April 2004.html

Cheers!
 

Status
Not open for further replies.