Lens Hood vs Overexposure


alancwr

New Member
Sep 23, 2007
555
0
0
#1
can a lens hood actually help to cope with overexposure??

after adjusting the exposure settings, i sometimes still experience overexposure in some parts of the pictures...

can a lens hood help to solve this problem??


pls advise
 

Rashkae

Senior Member
Nov 28, 2005
19,105
12
0
#2
only if the overexposure is caused by strong light sources entering your lens from outside the frame. If not, it's you not reading your meter/histogram correctly, or not using the correct metering mode.
 

Sep 12, 2009
566
0
0
#3
Post a photo here so that we can tell you what exactly is wrong.

I have a feeling the dynamic range of the scene is too great for your camera.
 

GRbenji

New Member
May 24, 2010
1,057
1
0
#4
Camera can only capture up to 5-stops different in brightness. In certain situations, a GND filter may helps. Otherwise, can use exposure bracketing and then do PP.
 

ovaltinemilo

Senior Member
Sep 12, 2009
2,819
0
0
Sin jia Po lah
#5
Hi TS, overexposing has no real direct relationship with the lens hood. The main function of lens hood is to help eliminate stray light. Overexp/Underexp depends on the metering technique. It would be more helpful to look at how histogram works. But do keep in mind that some scenes exceed the dynamic range of your camera..which means it would bound to clip some area of the scene.
 

Last edited:

alancwr

New Member
Sep 23, 2007
555
0
0
#6
Hmmm when I take my pictures I'll usually adjust the metering followed by taking a few pictures adjust the exposure +- lo
 

Sep 12, 2009
566
0
0
#7
Hmmm when I take my pictures I'll usually adjust the metering followed by taking a few pictures adjust the exposure +- lo
That's the whole point. If the difference between the darkest and lightest parts of the scene is too great, your camera can't nail the exposure in a single shot unaided.
 

alancwr

New Member
Sep 23, 2007
555
0
0
#8
That's the whole point. If the difference between the darkest and lightest parts of the scene is too great, your camera can't nail the exposure in a single shot unaided.
Hmmm I'm sorry but I dun really understand this
Can explain in more layman term?
 

Sep 12, 2009
566
0
0
#9
Hmmm I'm sorry but I dun really understand this
Can explain in more layman term?
The brighter parts of your photo need a very fast shutter speed to be "correctly exposed".
The darker parts of your photo need a slower shutter speed to be "correctly exposed".

Your camera can't correctly expose for everything in one photo.

Can understand?
 

alancwr

New Member
Sep 23, 2007
555
0
0
#10
Oh yeah now I understand
I can't properly expose the picture without going thru photoeditting?
 

Sep 12, 2009
566
0
0
#11
Oh yeah now I understand
I can't properly expose the picture without going thru photoeditting?

Most of the time yes.

But there are ways to correct the uneven exposure in some situations, by using a GND. Do a search on that, there are many threads that talk about GNDs.

Hope this helps :)
 

shelomoh

New Member
Mar 17, 2009
846
0
0
#12
GND or Active D-lighting (on Nikon) will help with huge contrast.

Or you can shoot HDR with multiple exposure.
 

Mar 18, 2009
253
0
16
Sembawang
#13
Based on my experience, using polarizer you may have a little more dynamic range.
Experts, please comment :)
 

ngck12

New Member
Dec 4, 2007
704
0
0
beside jurong point
#14
Overexposure is due to the sensor unable to capture the dynamic range of light. For better dynamic range, use film. Film has a lot higher dynamic range than digital sensors. Else do more digital blending or HDRI.

Polarizer will bring out more contrast and reduce glare, but is of little help in dynamic range. GND may not help that much also unless its more of a landscape shot with clear horizon.
 

catchlights

Moderator
Staff member
Sep 27, 2004
21,903
46
48
Punggol, Singapore
www.foto-u.com
#15
can a lens hood actually help to cope with overexposure??

after adjusting the exposure settings, i sometimes still experience overexposure in some parts of the pictures...

can a lens hood help to solve this problem??


pls advise
the purpose of lenshood is shielding stray light from cast on the front element for causing lens flare, to improving image quality, it has noting to do with overexposed image or help to prevent overexposed.
 

giantcanopy

Senior Member
Feb 11, 2007
6,232
2
0
SG
#16
Oh yeah now I understand
I can't properly expose the picture without going thru photoeditting?
Most of the time yes.
That depends on the type of scene you usually capture.
For me nowadays i select the scene that i can capture and do minimal pulling of details just from raw for > 90 percent of my shots. Blending / hdr is just abit too laborious, and i think i am too lazy.

Apart from chasing high dynamic range, remember that contrast and disparity can be beautiful too. Not everything is about chasing and getting details from the brightest to darkest shades

ryan
 

henry soh

New Member
Aug 29, 2008
851
0
0
#17
Hi, In extreme cases where the light is uneven, camera metering(multi segment) can't take 18%grey even with EV compensation. Some cameras come with hdr which is handy in such cases.
Other than that, shoot at different angles to get the best composition.
 

Sep 12, 2009
566
0
0
#18
That depends on the type of scene you usually capture.
For me nowadays i select the scene that i can capture and do minimal pulling of details just from raw for > 90 percent of my shots. Blending / hdr is just abit too laborious, and i think i am too lazy.

Apart from chasing high dynamic range, remember that contrast and disparity can be beautiful too. Not everything is about chasing and getting details from the brightest to darkest shades

ryan

I know. Not everything has to be edited laboriously via exposure blend. My answer to his question is that yes, processing is necessary most of the time, for "proper exposure", but proper might not always be pleasing.

That said, you might want to take a look at Photomatix if you haven't already done so, the blending is automated and relatively reliable- for the rare occasions that you wish to exposure blend in the first place :)
 

Top Bottom