lens for potraiture?


jrhellboy

New Member
Mar 2, 2011
66
0
0
#1
hello hello! i've been shooting for more then a year now, mostly streets and covering events. However, i've recently been "recruited" to aid my friend in her professional makeup business. Hence i wanna ask if there's anyone out there doing something similar (i.e take pictures of blogshop models) for some tips on lens choices. I've only aquired primes throughout my shooting journey, mainly 35mm f1.8 and 50mm f1.2. I also have a tamron 90mm f2.8 which i've heard produces decent potraiture shots.

I'm assuming it won't be under studio conditions, so i'd at most have a flashgun on top of my gear and I'm worried i have to change my lens too often.

so, would it be wise to get nikon's 24-70mm f2.8 (open to others) or just stick with my gear? (of course i can stick with my prime and move myself, but would a zoom be essential in this professional setting?)

And any other tips on non studio potraiture is greatly appreciated!

thanks in advance! :)
 

daredevil123

Moderator
Staff member
Oct 25, 2005
21,657
66
48
lil red dot
#2
hello hello! i've been shooting for more then a year now, mostly streets and covering events. However, i've recently been "recruited" to aid my friend in her professional makeup business. Hence i wanna ask if there's anyone out there doing something similar (i.e take pictures of blogshop models) for some tips on lens choices. I've only aquired primes throughout my shooting journey, mainly 35mm f1.8 and 50mm f1.2. I also have a tamron 90mm f2.8 which i've heard produces decent potraiture shots.

I'm assuming it won't be under studio conditions, so i'd at most have a flashgun on top of my gear and I'm worried i have to change my lens too often.

so, would it be wise to get nikon's 24-70mm f2.8 (open to others) or just stick with my gear? (of course i can stick with my prime and move myself, but would a zoom be essential in this professional setting?)

And any other tips on non studio potraiture is greatly appreciated!

thanks in advance! :)
Which camera are you using (crop or FF)?
 

Rashkae

Senior Member
Nov 28, 2005
19,105
12
0
#5
There's nothing limiting you with your current lenses. Heck, you could even use a kit lens. If you are on FF and you'll be shooting in a studio, a 50mm or 85mm will work great (but you have a tamron 90mm, so that's good enough), or a 24-70.

The only limit is you. Don't worry too much - blogshops tend to have mediocre standards for pictures. :p
 

foxtwo

Senior Member
Mar 11, 2004
2,522
0
0
singapore
#6
If it's makeup I would assume it's only the face right? Then 50mm is adequate. Even if it's full body just move backwards then. Getting another lense costs money, and I don't think the "recruitment" reimburses equipment fees. Like Rashkae says, quality is not that important. I've seen with my 2 eyes in front of me a blogshop photographer shooting a model with results of a disproportional head to body size ratio. It looks as crazy as it sounds, but apparently it's acceptable. Go figure.
 

jrhellboy

New Member
Mar 2, 2011
66
0
0
#8
actually i was considering 85mm f1.4, honestly it was on my list of primes to get.. thanks again guys! probably rent the 24-70mm and 85mm f1.4 for the first assignment! :) haha, the recruitment doesn't cover my fees, but after a few months of working with her, she'll probably cover my lens and a new ff camera body too. HAHA.
 

Edwin Francis

Senior Member
Mar 24, 2006
883
3
18
www.sgwriter.com
#9
Your assignment isn't really portraiture (which is about the subject), it's more commercial photography, specifically beauty shots, where the important element is the product. You already seem to have the gear for head shots (indoor or outdoor, doesn't matter).

Why get a 85/1.4 since you already have a 90/2.8? Selective focus? At 90mm on a crop, 2.8 is pretty selective already.

I'd think you have it covered with a 50 and 90. 35mm only if you want full-length shots. You might want a 2nd body to avoid the need to swap lenses in the field.

I think you should focus on is lighting rather than lens acquisition. Fill-flash, reflectors, scrims...
Good lighting and the ability to work well with models is more important.
 

Blur Shadow

Senior Member
Sep 17, 2005
4,886
4
0
#11
Cover your lens and a new FF dSLR? That's a sweet deal. My experience with the AF-S 85mm f/1.4G has been amazing, and I am certain you'll like it.
 

one eye jack

Senior Member
Jun 11, 2011
814
12
18
#12
Your assignment isn't really portraiture (which is about the subject), it's more commercial photography, specifically beauty shots, where the important element is the product. You already seem to have the gear for head shots (indoor or outdoor, doesn't matter).

Why get a 85/1.4 since you already have a 90/2.8? Selective focus? At 90mm on a crop, 2.8 is pretty selective already.

I'd think you have it covered with a 50 and 90. 35mm only if you want full-length shots. You might want a 2nd body to avoid the need to swap lenses in the field.

I think you should focus on is lighting rather than lens acquisition. Fill-flash, reflectors, scrims...
Good lighting and the ability to work well with models is more important
.
Dear TS, The advice in blue is the best advice given,since you are selling professional makeup services you will be doing a disservice to your friend,readup on lighting and never use flash on top of camera,the face will be unflattering.The effect is flat.
 

Oct 20, 2010
1,087
0
0
Shanghai, China, China
#13
Dear TS, The advice in blue is the best advice given,since you are selling professional makeup services you will be doing a disservice to your friend,readup on lighting and never use flash on top of camera,the face will be unflattering.The effect is flat.
If you know how to use the flash even atop the camera, you can get very good results. You just have to angle the flash head, use the bounce card, use ceilings/walls.

About whether you should get another lens or not, that all depends on whether you have time to setup the shot.
Since it is your friend you are assisting, you would probably have time to setup the shot and angles, so changing lens isn't a problem.
 

pinholecam

Moderator
Staff member
Jul 23, 2007
10,944
88
48
#14
There's nothing limiting you with your current lenses. Heck, you could even use a kit lens. If you are on FF and you'll be shooting in a studio, a 50mm or 85mm will work great (but you have a tamron 90mm, so that's good enough), or a 24-70.

The only limit is you. Don't worry too much - blogshops tend to have mediocre standards for pictures. :p
+1 to this.
Sums it up well.

You already have a 35, 50, 90mm. It is good enough.
You don't need shallow DOF or very good DOF control either.
 

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