LCD IPS or LED Screen or LCD TV Monitor better for processing??


dinokun

New Member
Sep 4, 2011
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#1
Wanna ask the sifu here, normally what type of monitor is a better choice for photographers??

I think we are all looking with at least 80% and above gamut color but wondering an IPS monitor vs a lcd/led tv which is better choice?

Toshiba Regza 24" 24PB1E PowerTV
Dell U2412M - IPS
LG M2341A LCD Monitor TV
 

Rashkae

Senior Member
Nov 28, 2005
19,105
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#2
Did you even bother checking any of this online???

IPS is best, followed by LCD. A TV is THE WORST for processing. I mean, some common sense lah...
 

IsenGrim

New Member
Jan 28, 2008
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#3
I did a large amount of research and thinking on my own:
Unless you're making your own prints, it doesn't make sense to get a super high end monitor.

Lets say you have a wide gamut high end screen. It means you will be able to see more colors than before. It also means if you saved your works in these extended gamut, other people will not be able to see it on their screens.

But if you're making your own prints with your wide/full gamut printer with fully calibrated monitor to printer to paper profiles, yes it makes sense.
IPS is the best. Then comes TN. TV can't even compare with a regular monitor in displaying other things.
 

Mar 14, 2011
34
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#4
Yeah I think ips panels are good. Btw I think dell's ips quite cheap.
 

noraa80

New Member
Nov 4, 2009
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#6
I believe it is best to have a calibrated screen or your colours are wrong.
 

narofx

New Member
Aug 12, 2006
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#7
IPS screens are really cheap now.. especially the 23" models. almost everyone is selling one now..

and of cos, calibrate the IPS screen
 

snowc

New Member
Jan 8, 2006
717
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#8
The Dell U2311 is a really good monitor. It's a pity that its discontinued and there's not much improvement for its successor (Dell U2312HM).
 

Cowseye

Senior Member
Mar 7, 2010
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#9
snowc said:
The Dell U2311 is a really good monitor. It's a pity that its discontinued and there's not much improvement for its successor (Dell U2312HM).
More like deprovement.... They took away some ports.... Not sure if it is priced lower or higher..
 

snowc

New Member
Jan 8, 2006
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#10
More like deprovement.... They took away some ports.... Not sure if it is priced lower or higher..
The price is higher. If I'm not wrong, the dell website is pricing it at $309.
 

Mar 14, 2011
34
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#11
Yeah u2311h is dam cheap for 279..
Just that i heard de quality control was quite bad
 

cks2k2

New Member
Feb 12, 2009
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#13
I just bought the 2312 for $259 last week.
 

Ah Pao

Senior Member
Nov 7, 2003
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#15
Not so much the panel technology that I consider when I purchase my monitor, but rather colour accuracy and the resolution.

In terms of colour accuracy, most of us can get by with the sRGB colour gamut, unless you are working with specialised needs in mind and you'll need the expanded AdobeRGB gamut. TVs are generally not recommended for serious editing work because of it affords little to no colour adjustment and/or accuracy (e.g. there is no individual R, G and B controls where needed, limited contrast, brightness and/or temperature setting, etc), and the resolution is not that great.

But, as a disclaimer, I've not tried calibrating TVs with a colour calibrating tool like Spyder4, so I may be wrong when it comes to adjust colour accuracy - it could be done after all. You'll need to do your own research on this.

Then you have brightness uniformity, connectivity options, and all the other associated parameters. I really recommend doing a thorough Internet research before making your decision.

IPS panel or not, it more often translate to viewing angles and pixel response time, which is not really critical in photo editing work where you start straight on to the monitor most, if not all, of the time.

I chose the Dell U2412M over the 23" model because of the aspect ratio (16:10 vs 16:9) - the extra pixels top and bottom help offset the space taken up by the menu bar and in Lightroom, so I have more working space. Having an IPS screen is a bonus, but I didn't fret much over it.
 

Daoyin

Senior Member
Nov 25, 2008
2,808
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West
#16
More 16:9 than 16:10 models in the market these days ?
 

seanyzf

New Member
Apr 2, 2011
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#17
We understand IPS monitor is the best for colour reproduction but since TV now also offer 1080p IPS display, how does this compare head on with the IPS computer monitor assumming they are of the same size and resolution.
 

Octarine

Moderator
Staff member
Jan 3, 2008
12,492
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Pasir Ris
#18
We understand IPS monitor is the best for colour reproduction but since TV now also offer 1080p IPS display, how does this compare head on with the IPS computer monitor assumming they are of the same size and resolution.
Sure that this condition can be fulfilled? TVs usually are a bit larger than computer monitors.
 

Rashkae

Senior Member
Nov 28, 2005
19,105
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#19
We understand IPS monitor is the best for colour reproduction but since TV now also offer 1080p IPS display, how does this compare head on with the IPS computer monitor assumming they are of the same size and resolution.
Tvs are bigger and have larger pixels designed to make moving images look sharp and punchy. Same size and resolution does not apply if comparing a pc monitor to a tv
 

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