Laminating photos


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Mar 7, 2002
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#1
Hi,

Is it a good idea to laminate photos which are printed on A4 photo paper at home using standard home inkjet printers?

comments appreciated...
 

Apr 22, 2002
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#2
from my own experience with canon printers...if i dont laminate and leave it exposed to the environment, you will get sunset potos ...hahhhahha...color fading...

but then with the same potos, i placed it in an aircon room (office)...the color remains intact...

at home: those in the photoframe remains alrite while those exposed printed potos fade...
:dunno: not sure about the rest.,....
 

e_liau

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#3
Originally posted by MatthewSCL
from my own experience with canon printers...if i dont laminate and leave it exposed to the environment, you will get sunset potos ...hahhhahha...color fading...
I experienced that same problem with Canon printer's printer catridges too. Sunset photos... once vivid, now sunset.:(

Laminate the photo help for a certian time frame. But after awhile, the plastic will detract from the photos.
 

Zerstorer

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Jul 8, 2002
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#4
Originally posted by MatthewSCL
from my own experience with canon printers...if i dont laminate and leave it exposed to the environment, you will get sunset potos ...hahhhahha...color fading...

but then with the same potos, i placed it in an aircon room (office)...the color remains intact...

at home: those in the photoframe remains alrite while those exposed printed potos fade...
:dunno: not sure about the rest.,....
Sounds like gas fading.
 

Zerstorer

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Originally posted by e_liau
:bsmilie: :bsmilie: :bsmilie:
What's the joke?:confused:

It's actually not a crude term but a known phenomenon:

"fading caused by ozone and other atmospheric pollutants (gas fading), "-Wilhelm Research

;)

Some brands of photo papers are more resistant than others, but ultimately storing prints behind glass are the best solution.
 

Mar 7, 2002
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#7
i am quite surprised to hear of 'sunset' photos. I was under the impression from canon's advertisement claims that the photos are suppose to last 25 years. i hope the 25 years does not mean 25 years in a dark air-conditioned room for 25 years..
 

Apr 22, 2002
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#8
Originally posted by urban
i am quite surprised to hear of 'sunset' photos. I was under the impression from canon's advertisement claims that the photos are suppose to last 25 years. i hope the 25 years does not mean 25 years in a dark air-conditioned room for 25 years..
under non UV condition they mean....meaning your potos are will last provided they are not exposed to sunlight....

I dont understand the plastic will detract from the potos????? what do you mean e_liau????...
 

e_liau

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#9
Originally posted by Zerstorer
It's actually not a crude term but a known phenomenon:
"fading caused by ozone and other atmospheric pollutants (gas fading), "-Wilhelm Research
;)
Some brands of photo papers are more resistant than others, but ultimately storing prints behind glass are the best solution.
Yeah, agreed on that. :)
 

tualan

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#10
Originally posted by urban
Hi,

Is it a good idea to laminate photos which are printed on A4 photo paper at home using standard home inkjet printers?

comments appreciated...
I bought a laminator designed for such job. It has functions like temperature control and pressure settings to minimize damage.

You need good laminating films too, Japanese ones leaves no unsightly bubbles compared to China made stuff. There is a supplier near Selegie house who have everything you need. The right equipment combo is not cheap however.

Your photos keeps well. And easy to mount with masking tape without tearing the paper. Matt surface papers look 'brighter' too.
Disadvantage is glares and reflections when viewed from wrong angles. Photos is heavier due to front and back plastic sealing.

You must dry the printouts first. Otherwise the wet ink will eventualy run and subjects start to show bushy brows and afro hair. I leave them in a dry cabinet for days.

People are appreciative of laminated photos, it keeps from handling damage and they won't come back so soon for replacements when faded.

Laminating is unneccessary nowadays since you can get Photo-labs to print on real photo paper however.
 

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