Kukup


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Jan 31, 2007
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#1
Hi

Please provide feedback. it was taken at Kukup using D40. Thanks in advance.

 

Rashkae

Senior Member
Nov 28, 2005
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#2
Please follow the critique corner guidelines:

1. in what area is critique to be sought?
2. what one hopes to achieve with the piece of work?
3. under what circumstance is the picture taken? (physical conditions/emotions)
4. what the critique seeker personally thinks of the picture

writings like 'C&C Welcomed' or 'i took this at Ang Mo Kio' are not counted as short writeup.
 

Rashkae

Senior Member
Nov 28, 2005
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#3
Straight up, I can tell you:
1. Out of focus.
2. What's the subject? What's the point? What story are you trying to convey? I see nothing.
3. Horizon is not straight. Off by about 2 degrees.
4. Not enough contrast between water and sky.
 

Jan 31, 2007
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#4
Hi

I was hoping to capture a holiday in laid back kukup kelong. Thus, the gal in play and the kelong.. I am sorry that I was not able to zoom any more.

Feel free to comment on anything, but I would most appreciate how I can improve on composition and exposure..

F/25, exposure 1/125 s.

The photo was taken under cloudy, slight haze conditions, at 200mm. You were right, there were almost no contrast between sky and sea. There were in fact not a lot of colour and thus i converted it into black and white. I know black and white photography is not meant to rescue poor pics but its nicer to me after conversion.
 

pcpsk59

New Member
Feb 26, 2008
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#5
Hi

Please provide feedback. it was taken at Kukup using D40. Thanks in advance.




I love this movement very much.. A clam and silent mood wonderfully executed but :think: composition is not much good has you selected and bit tilted image, and Image is looking very flat.

I made some changes :

>> Cropped

>> Image tilted

>> Levels adjusted

>> A perspective added

>> Image sharpened

>> Blue tint added since our BG with ocean and for a silent mood.

>> Framed with black to keep the focus on subject.

:) Hope you will like it

Thank you

PCP
Chennai, India
 

Fragnatic

Senior Member
Jan 24, 2008
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#6
I love this movement very much.. A clam and silent mood wonderfully executed but :think: composition is not much good has you selected and bit tilted image, and Image is looking very flat.

I made some changes :

>> Cropped

>> Image tilted

>> Levels adjusted

>> A perspective added

>> Image sharpened

>> Blue tint added since our BG with ocean and for a silent mood.

>> Framed with black to keep the focus on subject.

:) Hope you will like it

Thank you

PCP
Chennai, India
hi bro, u just tilted it the other way :sweat:
 

Aug 31, 2005
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Bt Timah
#8
actually i think the jetty and horizon are not parallel, original picture's jetty not horizontal..adjusted liaoz become horizon not straight
 

Jan 31, 2007
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#9
Hi

Thanks for the inputs and modification. I learnt quite a lot. I never thought a slight tilt of the horizon is so critical and saw the wonders of the blue tint for a peaceful image.

Thanks for all the feedback. Sometimes you just hope to go back to the same scene and take the same pic again and again... but haha... very hard..
 

Jan 31, 2007
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#10
Hi

I edited the photo with the feedback given.

1) rotated pic counter clockwise 0.35 degrees.
2) sharpened a bit
3) cropped in attempt to improve on the focus.
4) Left the colour as it is. Tried Sepia and cool but prefer the neutral colour.

When i took this pic, I was practising the following

1) cutting of horizon. I always cannot decide the position of the horizon. This is espeically so since the waves and sky were not very interesting.
2) One Third rule of subject. And also the position to "crop" the bridge off (on the kelong..) I did not include the kelong house in the original picture I took. this is to leave a perception that the 3 people in the pic are in the middle of the sea. (suggested by extremely long bridge.) In fact they are in the middle of sea on a Kelong.

Thanks for all comments. I should have spelt out clearly my motivation in the picture much earier as shown in the 2nd point.:)

 

pcpsk59

New Member
Feb 26, 2008
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#11
Hi

Thanks for the inputs and modification. I learnt quite a lot. I never thought a slight tilt of the horizon is so critical and saw the wonders of the blue tint for a peaceful image.

Thanks for all the feedback. Sometimes you just hope to go back to the same scene and take the same pic again and again... but haha... very hard..

:bsmilie: Thankyou
 

Fragnatic

Senior Member
Jan 24, 2008
859
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Serangoon, Singapore
#12
In other way ??

what do you mean by ?? :dunno:


:think:
i think people usually keep the horizon horizontal, not the subject/foreground. esp. in this photo, the tilted horizon is quite disturbing since it is quite obvious.

Hi

Thanks for the inputs and modification. I learnt quite a lot. I never thought a slight tilt of the horizon is so critical and saw the wonders of the blue tint for a peaceful image.

Thanks for all the feedback. Sometimes you just hope to go back to the same scene and take the same pic again and again... but haha... very hard..
to me, when taking landscapes, the horizon must be perfectly horizontal. unless the tilt is on purpose for certain effects, feel, or style, it must be kept perfectly horizontal. for ur slight tilt (which is still evident in the edited photo), it shows that u have not been meticulous. feels kinda sloopy while u frame the photo.

i've corrected it below.

 

pcpsk59

New Member
Feb 26, 2008
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#13
i think people usually keep the horizon horizontal, not the subject/foreground. esp. in this photo, the tilted horizon is quite disturbing since it is quite obvious.



to me, when taking landscapes, the horizon must be perfectly horizontal. unless the tilt is on purpose for certain effects, feel, or style, it must be kept perfectly horizontal. for ur slight tilt (which is still evident in the edited photo), it shows that u have not been meticulous. feels kinda sloopy while u frame the photo.

i've corrected it below.



I too tilted the same way first but Image looks so flat without any depth. To give a perspective and depth to the image, I added perspective in transform while doing PP.:)
 

Jan 31, 2007
240
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#14
Hi

Thanks for all the feedback and comments.

For my next shoot, I am going to keep asking myself

1) Where is the depth? (if only I could take from another angle with the bridge leading to the small hut :p)
2) Contrast
3) Lightings.

Thanks, once again for providing feedback to a newbie.
 

night86mare

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Aug 25, 2006
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#15
the rule of thumb of photography is to correct any tilt present to the HORIZON first. the whole world can be upside down but you know that the first thing one subconsciously looks for is the horizon.

which is why pcpsk59's correction is as good as no correction after all - at first i thought i was looking at the original image that he was commenting on, then i realised that it was the image he had edited. this is because i cannot seem to view the ts' original image, btw.

why is there this problem? first off, maybe the hut is not built properly already. second, maybe the hut is at an angle to the horizon, if the horizontal in the hut is not parallel it could be at an angle to the horizon and not running parallel to it based on the direction if you are facing. and it is relatively close to you so this is not resolved. think about it, if you have a river bank near to you, but it is coming towards you, it will appear to be slanted, even though it should be straight. same for running away from you. this is called horizontal perspective problem. based on ts' posted corrected image in #10, this would appear to be the problem assuming that the hut was built correctly. there does not seem to be any vertical perspective problem though (due to your camera back not being entirely vertical too, here it is either ok in the first place, or corrected already.

this is after rotation of 0.6 degrees anticlockwise, btw. before that horizon still slanted. after rotation you realise that the path leading to hut seems to be slanting downwards - this is consistent with the hut coming closer to the vantage point of the photographer, else it should be slanted up, if i'm not wrong. it is a little late over here so i might have trouble visualisation, it's definitely one of the two though.

with the brief technicalities resolved, the composition of the picture, in #10 at least, i do not like. it seems as if the ts wants to take a "graphic approach" where the stark shapes stand out against a background. but there is not enough background, not enough space here. a less tight perspective- i.e. something wider would definitely be more suitable with this end result in mind.

all the processing suggestions here also do not seem to maximize the idea, the whites are not "clean" enough.

this is what i saw and i thought it would be more appropriate

 

night86mare

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Aug 25, 2006
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#16
In other way ??

what do you mean by ?? :dunno:


:think:
no offense meant here, but i think your understanding of landscape photography is not that firmly grounded - we are all here to learn though.

the horizon in your picture has become tilted. in fact, by quick inspection of your edit given in the first post you have posted here, the only thing i can think of as being your guide is the verticality of the poles. which are not the most accurate thing to use here. the most accurate thing as always, is the horizon in the distance, followed by the verticals in the centre most of the picture.
 

night86mare

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Aug 25, 2006
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#17
I too tilted the same way first but Image looks so flat without any depth. To give a perspective and depth to the image, I added perspective in transform while doing PP.:)
here, i am confused by what you mean

first off - what perspective in transform are you talking about? i suppose there is horizontal perspective correction and vertical perspective correction - those are the closest terms that come to mind.. but

neither of these will help to do anything with regards to an image looking flat or having any depth.

depth is to do with sharpness from foreground to background, here there are zero issues with this. if you mean that the object looks 2d, then that is to do with the nature of the composition, framing and approach taken here. to show "depth" one would need a much wider view than what is displayed here.

personally, i don't usually comment on other's comments since there is a difference in viewpoint that one person should respect for another, but i would like to state here that based on the few posts you have done here along with your suggestions, either we have a different understanding of common photographic terms, or you are not really certain what you are doing. with regards to technical aspect of photography, there are definitely set meanings and definitions and techniques.. and perhaps you could do some more brushing up before giving advice in this aspect, lest you confuse newcomers? :dunno:

i honestly mean no offense and i hope this does not offend you, or anyone. i hope that this comes through in a cordial manner. cheers.
 

night86mare

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Aug 25, 2006
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#18
Hi

Thanks for all the feedback and comments.

For my next shoot, I am going to keep asking myself

1) Where is the depth? (if only I could take from another angle with the bridge leading to the small hut :p)
2) Contrast
3) Lightings.

Thanks, once again for providing feedback to a newbie.
please read this article here about depth, i hope this will help you better understand what depth is.

generally (though not true all the time), most telephoto (i.e. more than 50mm) perspectives will not offer you great depth, when you use telephoto, there is the idea of isolating elements.. i am not exactly sure what your focal length used here is in 35mm terms but it does not seem to be very wide.. probably around 50mm onwards.

depth is usually applied to wider scenes, where one can use elements in the photograph to suggest that a photo is more 3d than it actually is. once again, refer to the article, there is a lot of ways to help to introduce depth which i will not bother to bore everyone here with.

contrast and lighting you shouldn't worry about - these are things, which you can ONLY control in a studio. anything outdoors, when it coems to landscapes especially, you have limited control. maybe if you'e taking portraiture it's a different story with a lot of equipment but most of the time, you will have less. my advice is, if in doubt, take a picture first, and process it to attain a certain visualisation that you have when you take it. what hte camera produces is often from what we "see" in our minds - and if you are not having any end image in mind when you click the shutter, then it means you have not thought about the composition at all, and should not. :)
 

Jan 31, 2007
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#19
Hi

1) Sorry for posting such a "dark" picture. The picture looked okay pn my screen but was quite dark when I printed out on my printer. I was wondering why every1 edited the pictures to be so bright. the grey scale of my monitor was off! (colour was okay wehn I compare colour chart with my Canon printer print out.)

2) Hi night86mare, thanks for taking time for all the feedback and advice! You were right! I was using my 55-200mm lens at 200mm. I thought it would be okay since the object was so far away. I think you really sum up things well and taught us a lot of things!

3) Playing with light and exposure.. I had been trying to advoid the 11am to 3pm harsh some light. After seeing some stunning pictures using shadow or angle of the sun, well I guess that only means that if circumstances allow, no harm going back at take another picture at 6pm :p

Just to share with every1 some nice pics.

http://forums.dpreview.com/forums/read.asp?forum=1034&message=26995315



Thanks every1!
 

calebk

Senior Member
Jul 25, 2006
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Clementi
#20
There is only so much you can do to try and repair a bad image. It is out of focus to begin with. That is what distracts me the most. No amount of sharpening, or anything else, will change this.

Next time, get it right on the spot.
 

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