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delirious

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#1
er..what does ISO means??and shutter speed??
for night shot,whats the best arrangement??
 

May 29, 2002
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#2
ISO or ASA refers to ur film speed lor. say if u buy kodak max 400, u shld set ur cam's ISO to 400. for night shooting, if not using flash(my preference), will need tripod, then buy a gd film la... =) i prefer kodak ektachrome 100plus, v. nice results(saturated colors). there're oso other things need to be considered oso, mainly depends on ur subject. (",)
 

revenant

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#4
Originally posted by harvestnow
ISO or ASA refers to ur film speed lor. (",)
Not really for film only, also for digital camera. Higher ISO will results in more grainy photos. But SLRs are able to take higher ISO with much noise in photos.

Anyway, shutter speed is the time whereby the shutter is open to allow lights to strike on the CCD sensor.
 

harvestnow

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#7
Originally posted by currahee
do the ISO 400 films still turn out grainy when processed to 4R or 8R?
it depends on which film u take, whether u shoot in daylight or night.
if @ night, it will.
if it's printed 8R from Kodak MAX 400.. surely it will...
 

ziploc

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#9
Originally posted by currahee
so is it also grainy for 4R? for both day n night shots using either Kodak/Fuji 400?
If you need Iso400 to be printed to 4R while do not want to spend too much on the negative, a good choice is Fuji superia xtra 400. I've gotten pretty good results with it, the grains are pretty fine for an Iso400 film. Avoid the Kodak max 400. It's one of the worst, if not the worst (if you are coming down to today's seed, I can show you the prints from Fuji xtra 400).
;)
 

harvestnow

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#10
Originally posted by ziploc


If you need Iso400 to be printed to 4R while do not want to spend too much on the negative, a good choice is Fuji superia xtra 400. I've gotten pretty good results with it, the grains are pretty fine for an Iso400 film. Avoid the Kodak max 400. It's one of the worst, if not the worst (if you are coming down to today's seed, I can show you the prints from Fuji xtra 400).
;)
gee... well... it depends alot on the lab u bring into also...
to me... Color Lab gave me v. satisfactory results...
it's true, kodak max 400 is one of the worst.. gee...
even if fuji superia 1600 can give superb results.
 

#11
Originally posted by harvestnow


gee... well... it depends alot on the lab u bring into also...
to me... Color Lab gave me v. satisfactory results...
it's true, kodak max 400 is one of the worst.. gee...
even if fuji superia 1600 can give superb results.
Best way to use Max 400:

1. Shoot 1 stop underexposed.
2. Develop as normal.
3. Scan the film.
4. Convert to B&W.
5. Print the B&W at 8R and above.

Now, you get that arty farty super grainy look in your photographs suitable for mood shots. :)

Regards
CK
 

Ian

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#12
Originally posted by delirious
er..what does ISO means??and shutter speed??
for night shot,whats the best arrangement??
ISO stands for International Standards Organisation which is a worldwide consortium of national testing and regulatory authorities, industry bodies and companies. There are literally thousands of ISO standards and proposed standards covering everything from business practices (ISO 9001 etc) to road sign design and so on. ISO film speed ratings replaced the older ASA (American Standards Association) and are cross compatible so 100 ISO film speed = 100 ASA etc.

Generally speaking film speed follows the following speed scale.

25, 50, 100, 200, 400, 800, 1600 ISO.

Each time you double the number it is equal to a shift in film sensitivity to light of one stop. That is the exposure required is halved for each increase in film speed, eg: from 100 to 200 ISO.

Of course if you decrease the film speed, from ISO 200 to 100 you have to increse the amount of light required by a factor of 2.

There are some films of course that lie between the general sequence such as ISO 64, 125, 160 etc.

Generally speaking the faster a film is the more grainy it will be.

Shutter speeds is an indication of how long the shutter is open when taking a shot. A standardised sequence is used by most SLR manufacturers that runs like this.

8,4,2,1 seconds
1/2, 1/4, 1/8, 1/15, 1/30, 1/60, 1/125, 1/250, 1/500, 1/1000, 1/2000, 1/4000, 1/8000, 1/16000th of a second.

As can be seen the scale runs in increments of doubling or halving the time that the shutter is open. A doubling or halving of the time is equal to a one stop difference.

As for night shooting, there are few rules and it largely depends on what your intended subject is. As a general rule the best results are obtained when the sky is dark blue around sunset and the use of slow film such as ISO 100 gives the best overall results.
 

mervlam

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#13
Originally posted by ziploc


If you need Iso400 to be printed to 4R while do not want to spend too much on the negative, a good choice is Fuji superia xtra 400. I've gotten pretty good results with it, the grains are pretty fine for an Iso400 film. Avoid the Kodak max 400. It's one of the worst, if not the worst (if you are coming down to today's seed, I can show you the prints from Fuji xtra 400).
;)
reminder also that grains CAN be beautiful like what ckiang says. sharpness is another different matter.
 

currahee

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#15
thanx all for the info....anyway, i guess i will stick to my fuji superia 200....more of a multi-purpose film ;)
 

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butters

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#16
so wat are the general guidelines to observe when choosing a iso setting for a digicam(ie canon ixus/a40)? like when to use say iso 50, and when to use the max setting of 400? since digicams allow for unlimited trial & error, how am i to judge if the picture taken should warrant the use of a higher/lower iso setting?

also, i'm kinda confused on whether to change iso settings or the exposure compensation, since afterall higher iso means greater sensitivity to light? how does this differ from exposure compensation? hope one of the pros here can help explain.. :)
 

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butters

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#17
Originally posted by butters
so wat are the general guidelines to observe when choosing a iso setting for a digicam(ie canon ixus/a40)? like when to use say iso 50, and when to use the max setting of 400? since digicams allow for unlimited trial & error, how am i to judge if the picture taken should warrant the use of a higher/lower iso setting?

also, i'm kinda confused on whether to change iso settings or the exposure compensation, since afterall higher iso means greater sensitivity to light? how does this differ from exposure compensation? hope one of the pros here can help explain.. :)
:gbounce: pls pls pls... someone explain?
 

May 29, 2002
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#18
Originally posted by butters


:gbounce: pls pls pls... someone explain?
well, hope i could help...
guess basics still apply(film)
say like if u're shooting fast actions/under low light levels, then 400 would be a gd choice. things like, if u wanna take still life objects or extreme close objects with nice colors & sharpness, iso50 would still be the choice tht kind.(knowing tht fact tht digital cam can change shutter speed to suit lights/fast-or-slow actions as well).

hope i answered ur question.
do correct me if i'm wrong.
 

mervlam

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#19
My general guideline is to use as low an ISO as possible. If you find the photo blur from handshake or the subject is moving, use a higher ISO. Make sure that you will be comfortable (ie. hand-holdable) with the shutter speed of the camera at the particular ISO.

Generally,

lower ISO (50-200) for stationary subjects (eg. landscape, night scenes, macro work with flash)

higher ISO (400 onwards) for moving subjects (mainly indoor shoots eg. concerts with ISO 400 with flash, 800 onwards without flash)

if you are using digital, beware of electronic noise at higher ISO. If your camera has noise reduction, switch it on.
 

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#20
Originally posted by mervlam
my general guideline is to use as low an ISO as possible. If you find the photo blur from handshake, use a high ISO.
yea.. tht's what i would do too... gee... =)
 

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