is PP really needed???


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nannan82

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Mar 10, 2008
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#1
i realize most always do PP..... y is tat so??? and wa kind of PP usually needed???
 

Jul 5, 2007
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AMK
#2
Good topic. Perhaps you should start by including what is you thoughts on post processing. You have seen many thus should have already some perspective that PP may not be required (based on your thread title).
 

nannan82

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Mar 10, 2008
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#5
i still a newbie btw.... tis question come to mind cas.... last time during film era... no PP was done.. and good photo still appeared..... so it was like... now pple using PP to beautify/corrected the photo they took... it like.. erm cheating??? jus my tot... is digital sensor cant produce anything near film standard?
 

night86mare

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#6
i still a newbie btw.... tis question come to mind cas.... last time during film era... no PP was done.. and good photo still appeared..... so it was like... now pple using PP to beautify/corrected the photo they took... it like.. erm cheating??? jus my tot... is digital sensor cant produce anything near film standard?
you need to read more about the darkroom.. :)

film no pp? hahahaha.
 

giantcanopy

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Feb 11, 2007
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#7
i still a newbie btw.... tis question come to mind cas.... last time during film era... no PP was done.. and good photo still appeared..... so it was like... now pple using PP to beautify/corrected the photo they took... it like.. erm cheating??? jus my tot... is digital sensor cant produce anything near film standard?
r u sure there is no PP for film ? ;)

many of digital darkroom techniques are conceptually adapted from the traditional darkroom ... like dodge and burn for instance
 

nannan82

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Mar 10, 2008
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#8
i'm a newbie... dont bash me... ":p kindly enlighten me... hope to learn more abt PP seriously....
 

night86mare

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#9
During exposure, values in the image can be adjusted, most often by "dodging" (reducing the amount of light to a specific area of an image by selectively blocking light to it for part or all of the exposure time) and/or "burning" (giving additional exposure to specific area of an image by exposing only it while blocking light to the rest). Filters, usually thin pieces of colored plastic, can be used to increase or decrease an image's contrast (the difference between dark tones and light tones). After exposure, the photographic printing paper (which still appears blank) is ready to be processed. [4]
wikipedia..

see:

http://digital-photography.suite101.com/article.cfm/are_digital_prints_real_photograph

For high quality prints it is common to hand retouch the print to make the spot blend in, like the digital clone tool.
The technique of arranging negatives in layers in the enlarger to print a combined image is another simple darkroom trick. One common use is to combine a stock shot of the moon with another shot to give an instant moonlight scene. The negatives are stacked in layers, hence the name of the technique and this carries over to the digital technique of combining images.
blah blah blah.
 

eosandy

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Sep 14, 2008
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#10
i still a newbie btw.... tis question come to mind cas.... last time during film era... no PP was done.. and good photo still appeared..... so it was like... now pple using PP to beautify/corrected the photo they took... it like.. erm cheating??? jus my tot... is digital sensor cant produce anything near film standard?
Many of the techniques used in the digital workflow have their origins in film. Dodging and burning being two of the more obvious. PP is a necessity for many but may range from simple crop/sharpen to full-on DI work.
 

nannan82

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Mar 10, 2008
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#11
so simply put... no good photographer will shown their pic 'raw'????
 

Apr 15, 2008
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#12
i still a newbie btw.... tis question come to mind cas.... last time during film era... no PP was done.. and good photo still appeared..... so it was like... now pple using PP to beautify/corrected the photo they took... it like.. erm cheating??? jus my tot... is digital sensor cant produce anything near film standard?
As to cheating...you're telling me something uglier is better because it's more authentic?

I see it rather...as making 'good' become 'perfect' :D
 

Rendell

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Aug 2, 2009
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#14
This topic has been discussed several years already ... :)
But there is always 2 schools. See which one you like to join.
 

nannan82

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Mar 10, 2008
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#15
damn... really must learn abit of PP liao...... hoho......
 

J-Chan

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Sep 21, 2005
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#16
just the act of choosing film is already "PP", different films give a different tonality and feel..
 

nannan82

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Mar 10, 2008
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#17
This topic has been discussed several years already ... :)
But there is always 2 schools. See which one you like to join.
i always tot PP is akin to 'cheating'.... :p but i think slight PP-ing is need most of the time ba...... tis is really not a cheap hobby...
 

Rendell

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Aug 2, 2009
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#18
damn... really must learn abit of PP liao...... hoho......
PP not hard lah ... search online.

Most important you need to have a process map:

Eg.
1. Composition (Cropping)
2. Colour (Hue/Saturation/Curve/etc)
3. Contrast and brightness

Every one have different pp work flow. :)
 

Jul 5, 2007
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AMK
#19
For me post processing is required and ok because it is intended to make picture more beautiful. I believe everyone takes picture to present for others to see. Film makers want to make movies that audience want to see. So it is a matter of what mindset was the intention.

For instance it would be cheating, if I would say "welcome to Toa Payoh central where you will be greeted with nice, cool and beautiful weather everyday" and present this picture will; because TP central is damn bloody hot. :bsmilie:

http://i10.photobucket.com/albums/a110/spheredome/TPYPark/SDIM0162.jpg

However when I shoot forest walk locally with my Sigma, I will always PP to bring the contrast and DR closest to what my eyes see. I do wear polarized sunglass too. So using CPL filter is what I see and what I get.

Of course PP is also to get rid of ugly spot that is not ideally not to be there like cranes and birds sticking out of the old tower. In summary, if the post process changes (mislead) the facts you are suppose to present, then it is considered cheating.
 

pawpaw23

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Sep 10, 2009
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#20
Just to comment on this post. y night86mare need to laugh with the TS? i also considered myself as a newbie. is that how you respond when a newbie ask question?

Please enlighten the newbie, and don't humiliate them, we all start from the scratch.

Peace...

you need to read more about the darkroom.. :)

film no pp? hahahaha.
 

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