is it possible that your hand dont shake?


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wtm78

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Feb 7, 2009
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#1
i do notice that even after i notice my breathing, my hands still move a little. is it possible that your hand dont shake? or is it just my posture and breathing not right?.

i press the camera towards my face.. i think its my head that is moving not my hand... is that unavoidable??
 

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Diavonex

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Sep 23, 2008
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#2
Hold the camera with both hands and steady it by leaning and bracing yourself against a wall, tree or pole, car roof, anything. Or brace your elbows against your body while holding the camera firmly.

Another way to minimize camera shake is to use the viewfinder instead of the LCD when composing shots. Bracing the camera against your face helps steady it.
 

wtm78

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#3
my apologies.. i press the camera towards my face.. i think its my head that is moving not my hand... is that unavoidable??
 

hanqiang1011

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Jan 22, 2005
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#4
i do notice that even after i notice my breathing, my hands still move a little. is it possible that your hand dont shake? or is it just my posture and breathing not right?
Hmmm... I think the only way our hands wont shake is the time when we rest in peace... Only then, when blood stop flowing, and muscles start to die, then we are freeze still. ALL living person will have hand shake, regardless of how strong your arms or how fit you are. :devil:

There is a minimal shutter speed rule that we should follow. For example if your focal length is 50mm, use a shutter speed that is 1/60 or faster. If 35mm, use 1/30. Anything less than that will result in hand shake.

Of course, breathing do a part as well as posture. Your hands should lock close to your body, legs apart parallel to the shoulders. Then you do the usual composing, after that, breath in, hold it there, press the shutter button lightly - it should be squeeze slowly, when the shutter opens - hold your index finger there. After the shutter closes, release your index finger. And before doing this, please ensure your continuous shooting mode is off, otherwise, you find that while finger is on the shutter button, you will do continuous shooting rather that holding your index there.

Hope this helps. :)
 

night86mare

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Aug 25, 2006
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#5
i do notice that even after i notice my breathing, my hands still move a little. is it possible that your hand dont shake? or is it just my posture and breathing not right?
it will shake,

but you are not supposed to be doing stuff like 30 seconds handheld anyways, unless you are a rock, not a human.
 

Diavonex

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Sep 23, 2008
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#6
A camera with image stabilizer will help to minimise the problem.
 

giantcanopy

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Feb 11, 2007
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#7
Will shake la. just more or less.

Hence the concept of a safe handholding shutter speed - the reciprocal of the focal length ( 35mm equivalent ) As highlighted, if u r using a 50mm lens, the slowest shutter speed which u should be looking at is 1/50.

Understand the aperture / shutter speed / ISO relationships so that u may know what other equivalent settings for aperture / ISO etc works for a scene while having a safe handholding shutter speed. U can experiment try it out in different lightings

Other factors like good supported shooting techniques or lens / camera stabilisation will assist as well

Happy shooting

Ryan
 

Srono

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Mar 20, 2006
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#8
If u manage to hold ur breath in 10 minutes -> no more hand shaking :thumbsup:
 

Dec 28, 2008
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#9
If u manage to hold ur breath in 10 minutes -> no more hand shaking :thumbsup:
hahaha. don't worry TS, everyone is susceptible to handshake one way or another. its not a question of whether there is or isnt handshake, but a question of how much handshake.
 

wave125s

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Apr 27, 2009
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#10
Ya, it's a matter of whether your hand shake is detectable by your camera or not.
On this point, I notice that the bigger the sensor, the faster the shutter speed for the same condition (may not be true, just my 1 or 2 times observation). Maybe that's why when using a full frame sensor, the picture turns out better.
 

night86mare

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#11
Ya, it's a matter of whether your hand shake is detectable by your camera or not.
On this point, I notice that the bigger the sensor, the faster the shutter speed for the same condition (may not be true, just my 1 or 2 times observation). Maybe that's why when using a full frame sensor, the picture turns out better.
................

nothing to do with sensor, more to do with focal length being used, when compared on the same scale.

it makes no logical sense to say that handshake has anything to do with sensor size!
 

Jul 5, 2007
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#12
I have met people with natural slightly more noticeable handshake and not illness. There is/are website showing self-made camera stablizer.

Find a bolt that can onto the tripod hole of the camera. Tie a tough string (need to adjust to your hand and body height) to the bolt and other end to a big metal washer.
Secure the bolt to the tripod hole of camera and foot step on the other end maintain good line taut between the camera and hands.
 

hongwen37

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May 19, 2009
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#13
For guys out there, remember in the army we were taught the technique of aiming and shooting during range firing for our marksman? Things like holding your breath, dont snap the trigger, double action, tuck your arm close to your body... It is very much applicable when "shooting" camera too... Maybe can achieve one or two stops lower without using a tripod with the correct technique...
 

Sivakis

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Sep 26, 2008
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#14
I have met people with natural slightly more noticeable handshake and not illness. There is/are website showing self-made camera stablizer.

Find a bolt that can onto the tripod hole of the camera. Tie a tough string (need to adjust to your hand and body height) to the bolt and other end to a big metal washer.
Secure the bolt to the tripod hole of camera and foot step on the other end maintain good line taut between the camera and hands.
Yah, that's like a reverse monopod. Instead of the camera resting on the monopod (pushing down), the string is stopping the camera from pulling up.
 

giantcanopy

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Feb 11, 2007
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#17
Maybe that's why when using a full frame sensor, the picture turns out better.
The rule of thumb for handholding is based on the 35mm format, so for cropped sensors after accounting for the crop factor, it seems they need a faster handholding speed compared to the full frame 35mm sensor cameras with the same lens used.

Ryan
 

Fotophilic

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Jun 18, 2006
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#19
my apologies.. i press the camera towards my face.. i think its my head that is moving not my hand... is that unavoidable??
since u say head is moving and not the hand, then u don't press it to the face lo.

actually i'm sure that both ur hands and head also moves. just practice gd handling like what others said here. ;)
 

Shin Howard

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Feb 18, 2008
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#20
Tuck your albows to your body. Then grip the camera and the lens firm.
Hold your breath if necessary. Then shoot.
Just like army days, keep practising till you become marksman.
 

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