Is a lens hood good all the time?


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naresh666

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#1
i heard that u should use a hood even if u are just using ur kit lens? how true is this?

and also what differece will a hood make to a picture?

anyone tried he collapsible rubber hood?
 

espion

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Aug 25, 2005
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#3
absolutely. it gives some physical protection to the lens surface and it shield stray light from entering the lens. I use it in lieu of any UV filters.
 

tkbonz

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Dec 11, 2006
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#4
Imagine this... you're not shooting and you leave your cam slinging at your side, you suddenly decided to shoot something and you grabbed for your camera only to find your fingers on the lens...dats what happens to me when I did not put on the lenshood. So lesson learnt and its on most of the time!

However, some hood restricts the use of polarizers as the hood is very close to the lens...(eg. Nikon) and your hood will result in shadows in your pictures when you use your on board flash.
 

May 19, 2007
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#5
I've got a collapsible rubber hood for my 50mmf1.8 before because i cannot find the original lens hood. However, with it on, I cannot put on the lens cap when storing my camera in my bag and the rubber get distorted too after being in the bag for too long. In the end, i got so fed up with it, I didn't use it anymore. I subsequently manage to get the original hood after some looking around and after I got it, it stays on my lens permanently (maybe because I don't have a circular polariser yet ?!). Well, in my opinion, get the original and not the rubber hood.
 

pai

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Nov 24, 2004
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#6
i can think of a few times not to use a hood lah.

1) if using a wide-angle lens with in-built flash. the hood may cast a shadow.
2) some hoods make it very hard to use a polariser.
3) er if you want to look less intimidating, then remove the hood lor. lens looks smaller :sweatsm:
 

Denosha

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Dec 25, 2003
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#7
If you want to use lens-mounted macro flashes or filter holders (like Cokin), it also prevents you from using the lens hood.

Anyway, I'd have to agree with espion about the physical protection aspects of using a lens hood. For me, it's probably the best reason to use one. :)
 

catchlights

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#8
yes, if you happen to see any professional photographers, or cinematographer at work, be it in studio, or location, they all use lens hood all the time.

Not so much about protecting the lens, but to shield stray light enter the lens.
 

jasperng

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May 12, 2007
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#9
my 17-55 f2.8 when using a hood under low light condition, will cause bad vignetting and 17 end. remove hood try again, vignetting problem got better.
 

ipin

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Nov 21, 2005
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#10
my 17-55 f2.8 when using a hood under low light condition, will cause bad vignetting and 17 end. remove hood try again, vignetting problem got better.
I don't think this is a case of vignetting, but a vignetting effect due to either the edges of the hood obstructing the light entering the lens or the edges of the hood casting a shadow. :)
 

Jun 23, 2007
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#12
Does the brand of the hoods affect the quality of the pix? Why the difference in the hood prices?
 

Mar 15, 2005
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#13
Does the brand of the hoods affect the quality of the pix? Why the difference in the hood prices?
Usually one should stick with the same brand hood as the lens i.e. Nikon lens with compatible Nikon lens hood. The camera maker has already done its homework and the correct lens hood should not cause any vignetting with the matching lens. Unfortunately original lens hoods can be quite expensive. Canon does not supply lens hood for most of their lenses with the exception of "L" lenses. However third party lenses like Tamron or Sigma will give you the lens hood when you purchase the lens.

The only lens I think you can get away with a third party hood is the 50mm lens. Most of the are made of rubber and had fold back for easy storage in your camera bag.
 

Ansel

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#14
yes, if you happen to see any professional photographers, or cinematographer at work, be it in studio, or location, they all use lens hood all the time.

Not so much about protecting the lens, but to shield stray light enter the lens.
Well, catchlights wrote exactly what I wanted to write.

In principle, all non-image-forming light should be blocked from entering the lens because they will degrade the image quality. Modern multi-coating technology has decreased the effect of stray lights somewhat, but it has not totally removed the effect. You paid so much for a great lens, so you would want to absolutely optimize its performance. Thus the use of lens hood.

Ansel Adams said, never take a picture without using a lens hood.
 

Jun 23, 2007
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#15
The lens I got did not come with the hood. But I can buy the canon original hood which is more expensive or go for cheaper hoods. Just wondering whether a third party one would affect the pix since it may not be originally designed for the lense.
 

Ansel

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#16
The lens I got did not come with the hood. But I can buy the canon original hood which is more expensive or go for cheaper hoods. Just wondering whether a third party one would affect the pix since it may not be originally designed for the lense.
For 3rd party hoods, if they specify the exact same focal length that is your lens, then it should be fine.
 

Snoweagle

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Jan 26, 2005
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#17
I prefer the original hoods. Some 3rd party ones do not provide as much 'coverage' as the originals. Try to see and if it's ok with yr lens, then y not.
 

catchlights

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#18
I prefer the original hoods. Some 3rd party ones do not provide as much 'coverage' as the originals. Try to see and if it's ok with yr lens, then y not.
can use 3rd party bellow lens hood, which is adjustable, one lens hood able to fix all filter size, all focal length of lenses.
 

Jun 23, 2007
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#19
By Ansel: For 3rd party hoods, if they specify the exact same focal length that is your lens, then it should be fine.
How do I tell this? Just bring to shop and ask?
 

Ansel

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#20


How do I tell this? Just bring to shop and ask?
The hood box, packaging or enclosed literature should tell which focal length the hood is designed for. Some may even specifiy which model of the original brand it is designed to be compatible with, or which lens model you can use it with. For example, see this thread:

http://forum.clubsnap.org/showpost.php?p=2296631&postcount=21
 

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