Interior Landscape@MBS


andysim65

New Member
Apr 8, 2010
739
4
0
53
#1



1. In what area is critique to be sought?
I got no experience in this type of landscape pic, so any form of critique is welcome.

2. What one hopes to achieve with the piece of work?
To improve interior landscape skill by getting advice from anyone.

3. Under what circumstance is the picture taken?(physical conditions/emotions)?
This picture was taken handheld with nikon 16-35mm f4 lens at iso100 16mm f8 1/15sec, process in hdr.

4. What the critique seeker personally thinks of the picture?
Totally don't know how to judge this picture, so need the help of the expert.

Sincerely Thanks everyone who drop by.
 

jiongwei97

New Member
Dec 11, 2010
38
0
0
Novena
#2
Hi,

Not very experienced in HDR but I found this piece of work pretty interesting, like the composition very much, and the movement of subjects makes the photo more realistic. Generally I think the lighting is also well handled, but maybe you might want to take note of the ghosting as well :)
 

andysim65

New Member
Apr 8, 2010
739
4
0
53
#3
Hi,

Not very experienced in HDR but I found this piece of work pretty interesting, like the composition very much, and the movement of subjects makes the photo more realistic. Generally I think the lighting is also well handled, but maybe you might want to take note of the ghosting as well :)
Thanks for pointing out the ghosting i did not notice and thanks for your compliment too, i got no experience in this type of landscape picture so i dont know whether is good or bad.
 

thoongeng

Senior Member
Jan 26, 2010
1,294
20
38
#4
I'm also interested in interior photography, however haven't had much success yet heh... just basing my opinion on my impressions from looking at the masters' works in the forum

I think it's good that you kept the verticals straight and parallel, and colours looks ok to me
Feel that the sharp railing corner pointing straight at me a bit uncomfortable hehe

Waiting for the real masters to comment so I can learn too ;p

Thanks for sharing!
 

andysim65

New Member
Apr 8, 2010
739
4
0
53
#5
I'm also interested in interior photography, however haven't had much success yet heh... just basing my opinion on my impressions from looking at the masters' works in the forum

I think it's good that you kept the verticals straight and parallel, and colours looks ok to me
Feel that the sharp railing corner pointing straight at me a bit uncomfortable hehe

Waiting for the real masters to comment so I can learn too ;p

Thanks for sharing!
yes just like you also hoping the master could give us some advice, the railing corner is not at the centre of the pic , so i think not so bad, Thanks for dropping by and give your comments.
 

foxtwo

Senior Member
Mar 11, 2004
2,523
0
36
singapore
#6
Interior composition: I like the 1/3 placement of railing as it provides a sense of "action" within, because the curving roof gives a placid tone and the entire location is high classed shopping in very posh atmosphere. However, there needs to be something more dynamic happening within to support this piece of railing and there is not. That railing takes only 5% of the framing. It's not going to hold. The floor is dull and ugly, as negative spaces go, it's very negative. Sparse foot traffic makes it look deserted. And anyone clearly seen is going to become a subject matter, so take that into consideration.

You need some excitement/lighting but not overpowering at the same time if your subject is still the interior. Imagine if it were a reflective white tiled floor at our regular malls, that's clean and crisp which brings up the composition. Or having someone or persons prominently at the foreground to add interest or subject.

You may also be trying to hard to capture everything within frame. Analyse the key points or structural components you want to emphasise and concentrate there. Is the right side of the frame really necessary? Is this viewpoint the best to capture both sides of the mall? Etc etc. You do have a bit of an awkward flow at the left from the roof to the railing, but that's about it. And did I mention it's awkward?

I think it's quite a hard place to photograph without giving in to the glitzy and bright lights of the place. Subject matter has to be very strong, together with complementary elements. Abstract is easier to achieve. Personally I have not desired to shoot there. Not even the exterior as it doesn't speak much to me. Good challenge, will slowly savour it like fine wine.

HDR: Not done enough to liven the place. It's low contrast and while it may be true to the scene in a sense, it makes a boring photograph. Since it's taken at night, one cannot do without the interior lighting as the main light. If in the day, then interior lighting would be in support of daylight (main light). HDR is not about just combining layers of exposure. It's about how much detail the individual layers contain and how we bring it out. So if interior lighting is the main, and the shops are the ones providing most of the lights, star attraction is going to be the shops or rather the mall. In that case, having the railing placement is be out of place.

You really have to decide which is going to be the main point of the photograph, Composition or Lighting, then construct your photograph around it. With good composition can have simple lighting. For good lighting, it can have simple composition. If can have both then good for you but no need to be greedy.
 

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foxtwo

Senior Member
Mar 11, 2004
2,523
0
36
singapore
#7
Try imagining shooting in the day/evening just the left half of the frame. Use HDR to brighten the shop fronts and interior.

I don't think it'll be marvelous but it's a start. You can do some analysis on that.
 

Agetan

Senior Member
Dec 31, 2004
4,669
15
38
www.tomato.sg
#8
For serious interior work, you need to get better sense of correctness in lighting and color for the wall, the floor, etc.

I find it using the end of the railing divide the picture and image wise, I find it a little to threatening by having sharp edges on 3rd

As others have said, you need to really tell the viewer what you want to communicate.

Trying to fit everything in may not the best idea.

Anyway, good try but think more... A picture says a thousand words but which thousand is important.

Hart
 

andysim65

New Member
Apr 8, 2010
739
4
0
53
#9
Interior composition: I like the 1/3 placement of railing as it provides a sense of "action" within, because the curving roof gives a placid tone and the entire location is high classed shopping in very posh atmosphere. However, there needs to be something more dynamic happening within to support this piece of railing and there is not. That railing takes only 5% of the framing. It's not going to hold. The floor is dull and ugly, as negative spaces go, it's very negative. Sparse foot traffic makes it look deserted. And anyone clearly seen is going to become a subject matter, so take that into consideration.

You need some excitement/lighting but not overpowering at the same time if your subject is still the interior. Imagine if it were a reflective white tiled floor at our regular malls, that's clean and crisp which brings up the composition. Or having someone or persons prominently at the foreground to add interest or subject.

You may also be trying to hard to capture everything within frame. Analyse the key points or structural components you want to emphasise and concentrate there. Is the right side of the frame really necessary? Is this viewpoint the best to capture both sides of the mall? Etc etc. You do have a bit of an awkward flow at the left from the roof to the railing, but that's about it. And did I mention it's awkward?

I think it's quite a hard place to photograph without giving in to the glitzy and bright lights of the place. Subject matter has to be very strong, together with complementary elements. Abstract is easier to achieve. Personally I have not desired to shoot there. Not even the exterior as it doesn't speak much to me. Good challenge, will slowly savour it like fine wine.

HDR: Not done enough to liven the place. It's low contrast and while it may be true to the scene in a sense, it makes a boring photograph. Since it's taken at night, one cannot do without the interior lighting as the main light. If in the day, then interior lighting would be in support of daylight (main light). HDR is not about just combining layers of exposure. It's about how much detail the individual layers contain and how we bring it out. So if interior lighting is the main, and the shops are the ones providing most of the lights, star attraction is going to be the shops or rather the mall. In that case, having the railing placement is be out of place.

You really have to decide which is going to be the main point of the photograph, Composition or Lighting, then construct your photograph around it. With good composition can have simple lighting. For good lighting, it can have simple composition. If can have both then good for you but no need to be greedy.
Firstly , I want to thanks you a thousand time for putting so much experiment into telling me how to take this interior picture , seriously i got no idea what will make a good interior picture, all of what you have said , i will put into pratice in the future, once again i want to thanks you.
 

andysim65

New Member
Apr 8, 2010
739
4
0
53
#10
Try imagining shooting in the day/evening just the left half of the frame. Use HDR to brighten the shop fronts and interior.

I don't think it'll be marvelous but it's a start. You can do some analysis on that.
ok got what you want to tell me , thanks you again
 

andysim65

New Member
Apr 8, 2010
739
4
0
53
#11
For serious interior work, you need to get better sense of correctness in lighting and color for the wall, the floor, etc.

I find it using the end of the railing divide the picture and image wise, I find it a little to threatening by having sharp edges on 3rd

As others have said, you need to really tell the viewer what you want to communicate.


Trying to fit everything in may not the best idea.

Anyway, good try but think more... A picture says a thousand words but which thousand is important.

Hart
Yes sir agree with master , before i post this pic , i got no idea what to look for when taking a interior shot , but now at least i know more ,Thanks you for enlighten me .
 

andysim65

New Member
Apr 8, 2010
739
4
0
53
#13
the hdr is awesomely done~ but i dont find the composition any interesting
Thanks for the hdr compliment , yes i am a total nut when come to interior landscape,no idea what to take , so i post here to learn, and yes i did learn a few think from the expert , next is to put what i learn into the next practice.
 

sjackal

Senior Member
Jul 9, 2008
4,508
10
38
#14



1. In what area is critique to be sought?
I got no experience in this type of landscape pic, so any form of critique is welcome.

2. What one hopes to achieve with the piece of work?
To improve interior landscape skill by getting advice from anyone.

3. Under what circumstance is the picture taken?(physical conditions/emotions)?
This picture was taken handheld with nikon 16-35mm f4 lens at iso100 16mm f8 1/15sec, process in hdr.

4. What the critique seeker personally thinks of the picture?
Totally don't know how to judge this picture, so need the help of the expert.

Sincerely Thanks everyone who drop by.
Dear sir,

There is no 'interior landscape' because landscape usually refers to outdoor nature stuff like mountains, lakes, clouds and sky, trees and rolling hills. In an urban environment, you can call it cityscape if its outside or simply interiors if its inside, or interior architectural.

The sharp pointing corner of the fence is visually threatening to the viewer. Nature landscape pictures are often used to decorate rooms because it involve a feeling of peace and tranquility. But this picture puts the viewer uneasy, subconsciously. The same principle may be used for other purposes if the intent is to provoke a feeling, ie thriller movie, etc.

HDR is to manage high contrast situation, which does not appear to be needed here. I think you may have done it better with just one RAW exposure, than mess it up with HDR. The tone mapping gives an unnatural look to everything. IMHO, the HDR look had lost its appeal already in recent years. Tone Mapped HDR is almost usually associated with overzealous amatuer photoshopping nowadays.
 

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andysim65

New Member
Apr 8, 2010
739
4
0
53
#15
Dear sir,

There is no 'interior landscape' because landscape usually refers to outdoor nature stuff like mountains, lakes, clouds and sky, trees and rolling hills. In an urban environment, you can call it cityscape if its outside or simply interiors if its inside, or interior architectural.

The sharp pointing corner of the fence is visually threatening to the viewer. Nature landscape pictures are often used to decorate rooms because it involve a feeling of peace and tranquility. But this picture puts the viewer uneasy, subconsciously. The same principle may be used for other purposes if the intent is to provoke a feeling, ie thriller movie, etc.

HDR is to manage high contrast situation, which does not appear to be needed here. I think you may have done it better with just one RAW exposure, than mess it up with HDR. The tone mapping gives an unnatural look to everything. IMHO, the HDR look had lost its appeal already in recent years. Tone Mapped HDR is almost usually associated with overzealous amatuer photoshopping nowadays.
Thanks for telling the name for this type of photography, i got no idea how to name it. For HDR is my interest to learn , even of it lost appeal is ok , but i am definitely not overzealous photographer. Thanks again for reminder and critique.
 

Gangru

New Member
Oct 28, 2009
325
0
0
SG
#16
To me this works as a very good architectural shot. It is a very difficult scene to meter, with the different types of artificial lighting in the building. May be you can try at a different time. Just may be you can adjust your tripod to give a little more height to make the leading line more apparent(this is my personal preference only so you may have a different view). Cheers
 

andysim65

New Member
Apr 8, 2010
739
4
0
53
#17
Gangru said:
To me this works as a very good architectural shot. It is a very difficult scene to meter, with the different types of artificial lighting in the building. May be you can try at a different time. Just may be you can adjust your tripod to give a little more height to make the leading line more apparent(this is my personal preference only so you may have a different view). Cheers
Thanks for your suggestion , I use HDR to control the lighting , is a handheld multiple shot , 3 shot at different exposure .
 

CamInit

Senior Member
Nov 3, 2009
758
0
16
#18
Apart from what others mentioned, you could also experiment by cropping away the bottom for a panoramic format, if you want to emphasize on the spaciousness and depth. No need to stick with the given format if you are just doing it for yourself. And reposition your point of view so that the railing does not diverge and run contrary to the converging lines leading towards the left thirds (sometimes this might work but in this case, it doesn't), which ends in nothing really interesting. If geometry and strong lines are your thing, then maybe try out processing it in b&w or monotone.

:)
 

andysim65

New Member
Apr 8, 2010
739
4
0
53
#19
CamInit said:
Apart from what others mentioned, you could also experiment by cropping away the bottom for a panoramic format, if you want to emphasize on the spaciousness and depth. No need to stick with the given format if you are just doing it for yourself. And reposition your point of view so that the railing does not diverge and run contrary to the converging lines leading towards the left thirds (sometimes this might work but in this case, it doesn't), which ends in nothing really interesting. If geometry and strong lines are your thing, then maybe try out processing it in b&w or monotone.

:)
Thanks for all your suggestion , while I am still learning on how to take this type of pic , your suggestion become a useful tips for me . Thanks again.
 

zaren

Moderator
Staff member
Oct 27, 2003
10,976
33
48
#20
actually i would prefer cropping away part of the roof to focus on the railing, which is the strongest visual element in the photo. if the sharp point seems "threatening" to the viewer, then to me it's a good thing, as it evokes an emotion and makes the viewer take notice. the pano crop also helps to place the people on the upper third, which gives it a more pleasing composition imho.
e.g.
 

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