Interesting read on equipment lust...digital style


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liuhao

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#2
"...If you want to be a photographer, you just kinda hafta drop the cash you need to drop and then stop shopping and get down to work..."
 

willyfoo

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Somehow I don't fully agree to buying any camera and make the best out of it..

I agree to making the best out of it... but imagine buying 1 and then realising that there's this feature missing that is really important to you and you could have realised that by doing your homework.

Each photographer (or job/hobby) has his/her strengths and preferences.. each product has it's pros & cons too.. it just needs a bit of research to find out which is the sensible fit for ones needs.
 

Adam Goi

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#4
Originally posted by BraveHart
Was surfing through photo.net and came across this article. Given the fact that most of us here are rather obsessed with the hottest, coolest and latest gizmos that we call digital cameras, mabe its time to put some basic facts into perspective.

http://www.photo.net/mjohnston/column5/
:thumbsup:
 

YSLee

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#5
Haha, Hart, I see you've beat me to it here. =P

Note the lack of responses to the thread? I guess it's because people don't like to see the truth about themselves.

"All over the internet, it seems like gearheads and equipment mavens are always industriously comparing the merits of three competing digital cameras."
 

YSLee

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#6
Originally posted by willyfoo
I agree to making the best out of it... but imagine buying 1 and then realising that there's this feature missing that is really important to you and you could have realised that by doing your homework.
Show an example then. There're very few cameras I dismiss outside of the Sony line, and even then, some of the new Sony cameras show promise.

Plus, the author is not condoning buying any camera. He's saying that there comes a point when equipment wankery takes over and the tiny details are obsessed over.
 

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#7
Originally posted by YSLee
Plus, the author is not condoning buying any camera. He's saying that there comes a point when equipment wankery takes over and the tiny details are obsessed over.
:bsmilie: :bsmilie: :bsmilie: :bsmilie: :bsmilie:
 

willyfoo

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Originally posted by YSLee
Show an example then.
Eg. if you get a Fuji S2 and realise that you need the vertical grip but it doesn't have that option. Or you get the D100 and realise that min ISO200 is too high for studio setup.

What I'm saying is to do some research, not like what the author suggested to 'buy any'.
 

erwinx

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#9
Originally posted by willyfoo
Eg. if you get a Fuji S2 and realise that you need the vertical grip but it doesn't have that option. Or you get the D100 and realise that min ISO200 is too high for studio setup.

What I'm saying is to do some research, not like what the author suggested to 'buy any'.
or like when you realise 'wheres the mirror lock-up?' :angel:
 

BraveHart

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#10
Originally posted by willyfoo
Eg. if you get a Fuji S2 and realise that you need the vertical grip but it doesn't have that option. Or you get the D100 and realise that min ISO200 is too high for studio setup.
No vertical grip? Just hold it vertically by the regular grip. Sure its abit awkward...but SLR photographers have been doing that for years when a vertical grip is not available. No big deal really.

ISO 200 too high? ND Filters man.

The whole point is that each camera in that class will do what's required of it for that category of cameras....there's just no end to finding that *perfect* camera. If there's something you don't like about your camera.....u'll just have to work around it.

That's y research and reading online reviews are effective to a certain extent...you've got to handle the equipment before you know its suitable for you or not.

Or look at it this way...if the only choices on the market is a S2 and a D100 and you really NEED a DSLR for shooting.....what do you do? Just hang around and wait for developments (and hence not take any pics in the meantime?) or just get the one that suits your needs more? I suppose one could wait awhile if he had a camera already; but if this is your first purchase, this is the point the article is driving at.

Originally posted by erwinx
or like when you realise 'wheres the mirror lock-up?' :angel:
IS/VR/OS babe...the way of the future :devil:
 

YSLee

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#11
Originally posted by willyfoo
Eg. if you get a Fuji S2 and realise that you need the vertical grip but it doesn't have that option.
Hold it normally and turn it around. Millions of photogs have used cameras in that way and aren't whining.

Like what Hart said, it's no big deal.


Or you get the D100 and realise that min ISO200 is too high for studio setup.
And to add to Hart, you're in a studio.. Turn the lights down by a stop or two.

This is exactly the kind of mentality the author was trying to address.. it's really not very hard to overcome MINOR (very minor, I'd say) problems with decent cameras, yet you get tons of people nitpicking over the details.


What I'm saying is to do some research, not like what the author suggested to 'buy any'.
And that wasn't what the author nor I am saying (twice I'm making this point).. it's to stop obsessing over the finer details like someone with no life. Oh wait, that IS someone with no life
 

YSLee

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#12
Originally posted by erwinx
or like when you realise 'wheres the mirror lock-up?' :angel:
Frankly, it doesn't matter when your expensive super telephoto setup goes kaput eg. is sent crashing down a cliff into the sea.

Of course you could go the cheaper way by stacking teleconvertors, so the loss won't be so great (as well as the cost of replacing one).
 

erwinx

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#13
Originally posted by YSLee
Frankly, it doesn't matter when your expensive super telephoto setup goes kaput eg. is sent crashing down a cliff into the sea.

Of course you could go the cheaper way by stacking teleconvertors, so the loss won't be so great (as well as the cost of replacing one).
Earlier, Willyfoo stated:
"I agree to making the best out of it... but imagine buying 1 and then realising that there's this feature missing that is really important to you and you could have realised that by doing your homework."

You asked for an example of an important missing feature. I gave the example of mirror lock-up. And the above is your response? I don't see how mirror lock-up is related to camera equipment falling off a cliff. Of course, the use of mirror lock up is important when stacking converters.
 

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