Indestructible Filter


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sjackal

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Jul 9, 2008
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#1
Maybe this is old news, but... was buying a telephoto lens at MS Color and needed a filter, initially want to stick with B+W filters coz I like the brass rings, but no stock. So bought the Hoya reluctantly under recommendation from Florence, but now happy after seeing this review.

Check this out

http://reviews.photographyreview.com/blog/indestructable-hoya-hd-filter/

Great for people who don't use lens caps.
 

CatByTe

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Nov 4, 2008
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Punggol
#2
heh I own a Hoya CPL HD, however it will still suffer from the usual scratches..already got 1 when the blower tip flew out to hit the filter..
 

sjackal

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#3
heh I own a Hoya CPL HD, however it will still suffer from the usual scratches..already got 1 when the blower tip flew out to hit the filter..
Thanx for the testimony! Great to hear from real users instead of just brand reviews.

I think its only scratch resistant, not scratch proof.
 

CatByTe

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Nov 4, 2008
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Punggol
#4
But I would say its DAMN easy to clean the filter... :D
 

PrimePhotog

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#5
Hoya HD is actually quite good and easy to clean.However, I would still stick to B+W for the nicer build of the brass rim.
 

sjackal

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Jul 9, 2008
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#6
Hoya HD is actually quite good and easy to clean.However, I would still stick to B+W for the nicer build of the brass rim.
Yeah, I am a B+W user because of the brass rings too.

I just read that Hoya use aluminium rings because brass is more rigid thus will transfer the force of impact to the lens while aluminium are softer and easier to bent, thus would absorb the image damage better. It sounds logical for me.

Nonethelessly, the brass rings really feels different when screwing and turning, the alu rings feel filmsy and cheap. Well, I donno for fact which one is better. Both works for me.
 

Jul 26, 2002
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Woodlands
#8
Holy crap! I've got to get myself one of those!

Any idea about cost? Not having to put a lens cap on is very appealing.
 

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sjackal

Senior Member
Jul 9, 2008
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#9
Mind me asking this?

The Hoya HD is indestructible but is it scratch proof?
I'm looking for a UV and CPL filter which is scratch proof.

Is it true that only B+W filters are scratch proof? :dunno:
Nothing other than diamond is really scratch proof. :)

Even if they used diamond, the glass is really indestructible but the coating on it can still scratch.

Take a coarse sandpaper and try on the B+W, still scratch right? Its akin to dropping the lens on beachside's mineral rocks.
 

sjackal

Senior Member
Jul 9, 2008
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#10
Holy crap! I've got to get myself one of those!

Any idea about cost? Not having to put a lens cap on is very appealing.
My damage is below $130. So slightly more than B+W.
 

Octarine

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Jan 3, 2008
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Pasir Ris
#11
Any idea about cost? Not having to put a lens cap on is very appealing.
Nothing but a silly sales story. Next time a new car type of glass for car windshields is introduced where the car dealer showcase the stability with a baseball bat? There are lots of companies in this world having their entire business founded on fear and doubt: insurance companies, security consultants ... now also Hoya joins the club with creating the fear of a cracking filter. Just wondering how millions of photographers, camera and lens manufacturers in this world could have survived till today without these filters. Cause they all were only careful in handling the gear. :dunno:
 

3in1c

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Oct 23, 2008
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#12
Nothing other than diamond is really scratch proof. :)

Even if they used diamond, the glass is really indestructible but the coating on it can still scratch.

Take a coarse sandpaper and try on the B+W, still scratch right? Its akin to dropping the lens on beachside's mineral rocks.
:bheart::bsmilie:
 

Jul 26, 2002
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Woodlands
#13
Nothing but a silly sales story. Next time a new car type of glass for car windshields is introduced where the car dealer showcase the stability with a baseball bat? There are lots of companies in this world having their entire business founded on fear and doubt: insurance companies, security consultants ... now also Hoya joins the club with creating the fear of a cracking filter. Just wondering how millions of photographers, camera and lens manufacturers in this world could have survived till today without these filters. Cause they all were only careful in handling the gear. :dunno:
I'm not sure what you're trying to get at but if the filter works as promised and is indeed that durable, it sure is convinient to just ignore the cap especially when you need it on the fly or in the dark where fumbling with the lens cap might cause you to lose it or miss the shot. Sure, my examples might be a little extreme but it's a product that has it's uses.

Also, yes we do take very good care of our expensive equipment but are you so sure that even with all the extreme care that nothing is going to happen? It's exactly the same thing as buying insurance, just in case you might need it.

@sjackal
What's the filter size?
 

sjackal

Senior Member
Jul 9, 2008
4,490
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#14
Nothing but a silly sales story. Next time a new car type of glass for car windshields is introduced where the car dealer showcase the stability with a baseball bat? There are lots of companies in this world having their entire business founded on fear and doubt: insurance companies, security consultants ... now also Hoya joins the club with creating the fear of a cracking filter. Just wondering how millions of photographers, camera and lens manufacturers in this world could have survived till today without these filters. Cause they all were only careful in handling the gear. :dunno:
I guess this is how the world advance bro, better tech improvement is good thing. :)
 

Jun 12, 2008
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Jalan Poonpipi
#16
Yeah, I am a B+W user because of the brass rings too.

I just read that Hoya use aluminium rings because brass is more rigid thus will transfer the force of impact to the lens while aluminium are softer and easier to bent, thus would absorb the image damage better. It sounds logical for me.

Nonethelessly, the brass rings really feels different when screwing and turning, the alu rings feel filmsy and cheap. Well, I donno for fact which one is better. Both works for me.
This is a load of horseshit from Hoya. Any significant impact, both alu and brass will transmit the impact force to your precious lens, thru the filter thread. The filter glass is the first to break and might be there to scratch the front element of the lens.

Best protection - use a lens hood - the hood offers much better protection - from impact, from sea water splash, from flying saliva or other dirt. Upon impact, the plastic hood will either break or detach itself from the lens. BTW, I always go without the lens cap, with a hood and filter on.
 

sjackal

Senior Member
Jul 9, 2008
4,490
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#18
This is a load of horseshit from Hoya. Any significant impact, both alu and brass will transmit the impact force to your precious lens, thru the filter thread. The filter glass is the first to break and might be there to scratch the front element of the lens.

Best protection - use a lens hood - the hood offers much better protection - from impact, from sea water splash, from flying saliva or other dirt. Upon impact, the plastic hood will either break or detach itself from the lens. BTW, I always go without the lens cap, with a hood and filter on.

Not sure if it came from Hoya, I read it on clubsnap, someone else's post.

But what you said is true, if dropped, dont think brass or aluminum makes different. But when screwing, brass feels smooth and high quality. Aluminum feels filmy, scratchy and cheap.

I wished my bag was long enough to hold my lens with the hood out...
Most of my bags are long enough for 17-55 with hood, but the 80-200/70-200 need to reverse hood. Good thing about the 70-200 is it has the rubber bumper in front of the filter thread.
 

sjackal

Senior Member
Jul 9, 2008
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#20
The filters look tinted. Do they reduce the light entering the lens? If so, by how many stops?

Any user care to enlighten?
Tinted ones are CPL. Hoya claims 1 stop.
 

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