In which mode should I use? A, M, P, S?


iamseanism

New Member
Apr 3, 2013
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#1
Hi Photogs..of coz Noob here, asking questions I do not understand. Here we go:-

1) Started shooting since March 2013, totally no idea. Bought an OM-D + Kit Lens 12-50mm, Oly 45mm & Sigma 19mm + Manfrotto tripod. Been renting other lens to explore around with.

2) Self-learning thru Youtube & Google. A loner, no Kaki!

3) I don't really have a style of my own, i'd like to explore - Street, Potrait, B&W, Long exposure, Landscape, Architecture etc.

4) Here's my Flikr iamseanism's photosets on Flickr

5) Q - I have no idea when & how to use Apeture & Shutter Speed settings, always trial & error. Results - Mostly UNSHARP :sweat: ...long exposure for 30sec, is the Apeture always auto to the max?

6) Sometimes I'll overblow some shots or it's either too dark :angry:

7) Really need some piece of advise :embrass:

Appreciate some help here. THANK YOU
 

Rashkae

Senior Member
Nov 28, 2005
19,105
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#2
Have you read your manual? Read through the newbies guide to photography sticky we have here in CS? It will answer what aperture and shutter speed do, etc. Once you understand what they do, you will be able to apply this to your photography.
 

catchlights

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Sep 27, 2004
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#3
[moderator mode off]

A mode: for Artistic

S mode: for Sweet or "Sui" (pretty, nice in hockkian)

M mode: for Master

P mode: for Professional

Green mode: Green light aka Anything goes aka Party Mode

[moderator mode on]







political correct answer: it is written in your camera user manual.


advance reading: Understand Exposure by Bryan Peterson,

 

catchlights

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#4
for people don't like reading or have difficultly in reading...


[video=youtube;nQYRdPGPgwE]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nQYRdPGPgwE[/video]
 

Octarine

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Jan 3, 2008
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#6
What results would you expect from a person completely unfamiliar with cooking when placed into a kitchen? That's exactly your situation. Learn the basics so that you understand what the camera is doing. Trial and error is ok, but won't bring you really far because it needs baseline knowledge to analyse your trials and the resulting errors.
Check the newbie guide here, we ave them for a reason.
 

trd2970

Senior Member
Jun 8, 2005
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#7
hey peeps, have u even looked at TS's flickr, i don't think he needs a newbie guide...

To TS - i think u have nice works on your flickr... can't really understand why u need to ask the Q?
 

Rashkae

Senior Member
Nov 28, 2005
19,105
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#8
hey peeps, have u even looked at TS's flickr, i don't think he needs a newbie guide...

To TS - i think u have nice works on your flickr... can't really understand why u need to ask the Q?
Maybe he prefers to know what he's doing instead of relying on luck. ;)
 

Rashkae

Senior Member
Nov 28, 2005
19,105
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#11
Exactly!!!

I think I suck at shutter below 1"...any shot handheld, I'd guess I just need more practice or should I attend courses?
You should use a tripod.
 

TWmilkteaTW

Senior Member
May 30, 2011
2,251
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#12
Exactly!!!

I think I suck at shutter below 1"...any shot handheld, I'd guess I just need more practice or should I attend courses?
Longer than 1 second.?
erm. Then a question for u. Why would u want to handheld. Use a tripod or any other forms of supports. They are there for a reason.
 

iamseanism

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Apr 3, 2013
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#13
Longer than 1 second.?
erm. Then a question for u. Why would u want to handheld. Use a tripod or any other forms of supports. They are there for a reason.
I mentioned below a second... Like 1/60th, 1/125th, 1/500th.. These settings I don't know when to use them! Long exposure.. Yes, I'd use tripod
 

rhino123

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Sep 1, 2006
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#14
I mentioned below a second... Like 1/60th, 1/125th, 1/500th.. These settings I don't know when to use them! Long exposure.. Yes, I'd use tripod
Bro... one word of advise... go on an outing organised here in CS. That way you would learn alot more... because there are quite a number of old birds normally in these outings and they could give you tips and answer your questions while you and them are in a very relaxing atmosphere.

It is not that we do not want to teach you here and now... but it can be quite difficult (at least for me) and sometime what I write (I myself don't understand when read thru again). So if you are out on field with your camera, then it is easier to tell you what is what. So hope to see you in some of the outings :)
 

iamseanism

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#15
Bro... one word of advise... go on an outing organised here in CS. That way you would learn alot more... because there are quite a number of old birds normally in these outings and they could give you tips and answer your questions while you and them are in a very relaxing atmosphere.

It is not that we do not want to teach you here and now... but it can be quite difficult (at least for me) and sometime what I write (I myself don't understand when read thru again). So if you are out on field with your camera, then it is easier to tell you what is what. So hope to see you in some of the outings :)
Yes I understand. Looking forward to an outing. Thank You EVERYONE who replied! : )
 

Hinata76

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Apr 15, 2009
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#16
maybe u can try and play around with ur settings when shooting a stationary object..that way..who knows..u might know something....

'ohh..by using this..i get this shot..i see..i see...now lets try this...ohh..too bright....okok..'

know...try and see the results..from there..look for answers why doing this..can get that kind of result..(too bright..too dark...)

also if ur into shooting zoo animals..check out other users works around here..most likely they will share with u what settings they use...use of tripod anot...then take note of it...when the next round u go again...try it..

well thats how i practice..besides reading from forums..watch videos...see other's pple works...practice again...how these settings works for u...blah blah..
 

iamseanism

New Member
Apr 3, 2013
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#17
maybe u can try and play around with ur settings when shooting a stationary object..that way..who knows..u might know something....

'ohh..by using this..i get this shot..i see..i see...now lets try this...ohh..too bright....okok..'

know...try and see the results..from there..look for answers why doing this..can get that kind of result..(too bright..too dark...)

also if ur into shooting zoo animals..check out other users works around here..most likely they will share with u what settings they use...use of tripod anot...then take note of it...when the next round u go again...try it..

well thats how i practice..besides reading from forums..watch videos...see other's pple works...practice again...how these settings works for u...blah blah..
That's what I've been doing the past 4 months.. I'm exploring all sorts of photography. Although I'm not really getting it right but I'd LOVE every moment of it. Thank you for the advice
 

Octarine

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Jan 3, 2008
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#18
I mentioned below a second... Like 1/60th, 1/125th, 1/500th.. These settings I don't know when to use them! Long exposure.. Yes, I'd use tripod
Many of your shots would normally taken A mode (daylight) or M (night shots). In A mode the camera will set the shutter speed after you selected the aperture. The newbie guide gives a rule of thumb up to which speed a normal person is able to produce handshake-free images:
shutter speed = 1/focal length (some people add the crop factor here as well)
If the resulting shutter speed is lower then it calls for a tripod.
But then again: where does the shutter speed come from? Three parameters: the light of the scene, ISO, selected aperture (which you do in A mode) - and the selected metering mode (average/matrix, center, spot). All this is explained in the newbies guide and the book catchlights has posted. Take your time reading it to understand what all this means.
 

daredevil123

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Oct 25, 2005
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#19
Exactly!!!

I think I suck at shutter below 1"...any shot handheld, I'd guess I just need more practice or should I attend courses?
When handholding just try to maintain 1/focal length for shutter speed.

Instead of practicing with no understanding, I would suggest you read up more or attend some courses to learn the basics, and then practicing with the correct knowledge.
 

farbird

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Jan 14, 2004
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#20
Start with "A" or "Av"..
It means u control the aperture, the camera will automatically set the shutter speed to achieve "perfect" exposure

For "S", that means u control the shutter and the camera will automatically set the aperture to achieve "perfect" exposure

For "M" mode, means u control both the shutter and aperture and the camera will tell u by the exposure meter bar [ inside viewfinder ] if the exposure is perfect..

For "P" mode.... u try out the above modes and u will see what happens in P...
 

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