In need of some help....


#1
So I've read about the sunny 16 rule and I'm wondering someone who has mastered this rule actually remembered the whole light value chart and exposure chart so he can adjust the correct settings wherever he go without having the need to refer to the charts?

Please enlighten O' wise ones....
 

Octarine

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#2
How about giving your thread a proper subject? That would direct the attention of people to your question. :think:
 

catchlights

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#3
it is just remembering the value of the scene from the chart by heart, than evaluate the scene, than you able to apply the suggested EV to the scene.

memorizing what is written in the chart is easiest part, the hardest part is how to classify the scene correctly for most people.

I have read somebody cited about the Sunny f16 rule is not accurate in a forum, after further finding out from the poster, is actually his is unable to differentiate a Sunny Day from a Cloudy Day.
 

Atarandas

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#4
the Sunny F16 rule is handy rule to remember and serves as a reference point to adjust your EV settings.

Memorising the entire chart will not necessary make us experts in getting the right exposure ( relatively speaking). Like what Catchlights has mentioned, its the application and how we internalise the exposure values chart that are critical.

If you cant dfifferentiate whats city lighting conditions, whats shady, whats bright and considered sunny. Memorising the chart will not be helpful.

Sometimes, say a typical Sunny day could vary among different countries and timing throughout the year. We need to be sensitive to those differences and make adjustments accordingly.

Having said that TS, are you are looking for the utimate EV guru who can spot and identify the perfect EV at any conditions without reliance of a light meter ?
 

night86mare

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#5
i don't see a need to memorise because most slr and dslr will have the stops there for you to play with.

would rather keep my memory for better things.
 

clioboy

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#6
i don't see a need to memorise because most slr and dslr will have the stops there for you to play with.

would rather keep my memory for better things.
TS didn't say anything about DSLR wor..:bsmilie:
 

#8
The Sunny 16 Rule is simple. when the Sun is bright, set the aperture to f16, and 1/ISO for shutter speed.

The aperture is reciprocal to the shutter speed. hence, if you open up the aperture, you speed up the shutter by the same number of stops.

Why should there ever be a need to memorize the entire chart?

Also, the Rule ONLY applies when the Sun is shining (without cloud cover). Anything else would require compensation of sorts.

You want dead on readings? Use an external meter.


CHeers
 

clioboy

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#9
well, same is true for newer slr.

maybe if you have a camera that doesn't really have the stops there for you, i guess, e.g. lomography camera.
maybe PINHOLE CAMERA LAH!!!


anyway..

it is good to rem the impt bits..IF u working with manual camera, if not..just print a chart and bring it around if it matters to u so much..add a DOF chart too
 

night86mare

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#10
maybe PINHOLE CAMERA LAH!!!


anyway..

it is good to rem the impt bits..IF u working with manual camera, if not..just print a chart and bring it around if it matters to u so much..add a DOF chart too
aiyoh....

speaking of which, maybe i should try pinhole photography soon. :heart:
 

#11
Well, as part of my learning curve in photography with no regards to any genres, I would like to learn this rule and apply it. I'm pretty sure I can differentiate a sunny sky and a cloudy sky correctly and no, I am not looking for a guru for whatever reasons.
As I am picking up film photography, I've made myself a small chart to refer to but its always be too late to react to situations. So I was hoping to get some insights on how I can master this rule from the people who have mastered this rule and can effectively apply it. Also trying to affirm if memorizing the chart is ever a part of mastering the rule.
 

catchlights

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#12
Well, as part of my learning curve in photography with no regards to any genres, I would like to learn this rule and apply it. I'm pretty sure I can differentiate a sunny sky and a cloudy sky correctly and no, I am not looking for a guru for whatever reasons.
As I am picking up film photography, I've made myself a small chart to refer to but its always be too late to react to situations. So I was hoping to get some insights on how I can master this rule from the people who have mastered this rule and can effectively apply it. Also trying to affirm if memorizing the chart is ever a part of mastering the rule.
practice make perfect,

whenever you are with your camera, just look at a scene, any scene, try to gauge the EV of the scene, (using Basic Daylight Exposure Guide as reference) than use your camera to confirm your estimation, you will be able to read the scene with 1/2 stops margin after some time.

hope this help.
 

catchlights

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#13
maybe PINHOLE CAMERA LAH!!!


anyway..

it is good to rem the impt bits..IF u working with manual camera, if not..just print a chart and bring it around if it matters to u so much..add a DOF chart too
aiyoh....

speaking of which, maybe i should try pinhole photography soon. :heart:
do you know the aperture value of a pinhole camera is usually 3 digit?
no any hand held light meter, or any exposure chart able to help you about how to get correct exposure value on a pinhole camera. :)
 

#14
Hey Catchlights... thanks for your link. Its a bit easier to reference with yours than mine.

practice make perfect,

whenever you are with your camera, just look at a scene, any scene, try to gauge the EV of the scene, (using Basic Daylight Exposure Guide as reference) than use your camera to confirm your estimation, you will be able to read the scene with 1/2 stops margin after some time.

hope this help.
 

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