ideal lens for studio shoot


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akagi07

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Apr 6, 2006
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#1
just like to know say lens of what focu length are essential / good in such scenario?
never shot in studio be4, especially when all lighting setup nicely.

example:
1) 11-16 (don't think this lens is right in an indoor photoshoot, right)
2) 50mm (sharp, but not long enough right?)
3) 17-50 (normal range, should be ideal for all cases)
4) 70-200 (compared to 17-50, is this long range focus long for indoor?)
5) 70-300 (with sufficient lighting setup in studio, a constant backdrop color which bokeh doesn't comes in much, 70-300 can replaced 70-200 right?)

my opinion as above in the brackets. those who shot in studio or freq, can advise or feedback on my opinions?
appreciate
 

catchlights

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Sep 27, 2004
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#3
just like to know say lens of what focu length are essential / good in such scenario?
never shot in studio be4, especially when all lighting setup nicely.

example:
1) 11-16 (don't think this lens is right in an indoor photoshoot, right)
2) 50mm (sharp, but not long enough right?)
3) 17-50 (normal range, should be ideal for all cases)
4) 70-200 (compared to 17-50, is this long range focus long for indoor?)
5) 70-300 (with sufficient lighting setup in studio, a constant backdrop color which bokeh doesn't comes in much, 70-300 can replaced 70-200 right?)

my opinion as above in the brackets. those who shot in studio or freq, can advise or feedback on my opinions?
appreciate
is depends on the size of the studio, and what are you shooting.

if you are using D90 and shooting portrait in studio, 17~50 is more suitable for you case.
 

akagi07

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Apr 6, 2006
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#4
okay. thanks for the info.
just that my 20% of shots majority lies on closeup.
17-50 covers most of the full length body shots, was thinking if getting a 70-300 into the studio would be useful
 

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stinkyboy

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Jan 29, 2008
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#5
For Studio Shoots, i tend to use a 50 for my FF, and a 35 on my Crop Sensor. (and sometimes a 35 on my FF)
 

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#7
i've been using Canon 18200 for all my studio shots. If i need thin dof, i just use my cheap 50mm f/1.8 prime.

I usually shoot at f/8-11.
But what works for me might not work for you.
If i had the money, definitely, I would just have the 35L and 70200 f/4 IS USM.
:)
 

akagi07

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#8
thanks for the heads up too :)
 

hanqiang1011

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Jan 22, 2005
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#10
just like to know say lens of what focu length are essential / good in such scenario?
never shot in studio be4, especially when all lighting setup nicely.

example:
1) 11-16 (don't think this lens is right in an indoor photoshoot, right)
2) 50mm (sharp, but not long enough right?)
3) 17-50 (normal range, should be ideal for all cases)
4) 70-200 (compared to 17-50, is this long range focus long for indoor?)
5) 70-300 (with sufficient lighting setup in studio, a constant backdrop color which bokeh doesn't comes in much, 70-300 can replaced 70-200 right?)

my opinion as above in the brackets. those who shot in studio or freq, can advise or feedback on my opinions?
appreciate
1) 11-16 (don't think this lens is right in an indoor photoshoot, right)
This range is too wide, it will have barrel distortions near the center.

2) 50 (sharp, but not long enough right?)
If you read up about studio portraits, 50mm is ok, depending on which cropped body, multiple by 1.3, 1.5 or 1.6. It is in fact the most used range. 50mm is the so-called standard lens. Not long enough, just move your body around for more reach. As a norm, 50mm and above is the best range.

3) 17-50 (normal range, should be ideal for all cases)
If you are doing outdoor event, this will be a good lens, but indoor, not. 50mm on a zoom lens is different from a 50mm prime lens.

4) 70-200 (compared to 17-50, is this long range focus long for indoor?)
70-200 is ok, as mentioned in (2), it is sufficient for most shot. But prime lens are more preferred. Depending on personal preferences, 200mm's depth of field is shallow.

5) 70-300 (with sufficient lighting setup in studio, a constant backdrop color which bokeh doesn't comes in much, 70-300 can replaced 70-200 right?)
300mm is too much, unless you are shooting birds. For portraitures, up to 200mm is enough. The higher the focal length, the more compressed your subject looks - fatter faces than 50mm at the same composition (headshot) on the same subject.

Cheers
 

akagi07

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Apr 6, 2006
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#11
3) 17-50 (normal range, should be ideal for all cases)
If you are doing outdoor event, this will be a good lens, but indoor, not. 50mm on a zoom lens is different from a 50mm prime lens.

Cheers
50mm prime != 50mm zoom ? other than the aperture where one is f1.8 and other is f2.8
i didnt know about this diff
 

hanqiang1011

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#12
50mm prime != 50mm zoom ? other than the aperture where one is f1.8 and other is f2.8
i didnt know about this diff
Zoom lenses are lens which offers a wide range of focal length, for example:
Wide angle zoom 17-35mm, 17-50mm;
Standard zoom 24-70mm, 35-80mm;
Telephoto zoom 70-200mm and above

Zoom lenses usually have a min. aperture from the widest to a max. aperture, usually lenses stated up to 5.6 or 6.3, can set up to f22 using camera dial button. Fixed aperture zoom lenses usually costs more than this type of variable aperture zoom lenses.

Prime lenses are lens which offer just ONE focal length, such as:
14mm, 20mm, 35mm, 50mm, 85mm, 100mm, 135mm, 180mm, 200mm, 300mm...etc

Prime lenses typically all have one fixed aperture and can be set up to f22, generally more sharper than zoom lenses.

Read here: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Photographic_lens
 

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Anson

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Jul 31, 2006
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#13
I use mainly my 17-50mm for studio (product & model) shoot, and stop down to F5.6 ~ F8 with the camera tripod mount. Since in a studio, you had full-control of the lighting it's fairly experience and time to adjust your lighting condition.
 

akagi07

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Apr 6, 2006
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#14
Zoom lenses are lens which offers a wide range of focal length, for example:
Wide angle zoom 17-35mm, 17-50mm;
Standard zoom 24-70mm, 35-80mm;
Telephoto zoom 70-200mm and above

Zoom lenses usually have a min. aperture from the widest to a max. aperture, usually lenses stated up to 5.6 or 6.3, can set up to f22 using camera dial button. Fixed aperture zoom lenses usually costs more than this type of variable aperture zoom lenses.

Prime lenses are lens which offer just ONE focal length, such as:
14mm, 20mm, 35mm, 50mm, 85mm, 100mm, 135mm, 180mm, 200mm, 300mm...etc

Prime lenses typically all have one fixed aperture and can be set up to f22, generally more sharper than zoom lenses.

Read here: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Photographic_lens
i know all these already. but still appreciate the feedback.
just that since the difference is been mentioned.
comparing a 17-50 f2.8 and a 50mm F1.8 (adjusted to 2.8), both at 50, yes I agreed that 50mm prime will be sharper, but what other differences.. but this is ok, not the topest priority to me as of now. :)
 

akagi07

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#15
I use mainly my 17-50mm for studio (product & model) shoot, and stop down to F5.6 ~ F8 with the camera tripod mount. Since in a studio, you had full-control of the lighting it's fairly experience and time to adjust your lighting condition.
would a tripod be required?
I supposed in a studio since lighting are well setup, plus a ext flash on hotshoe, guess environment should be well lit.

find a tripod will restrict movement, unless shooting an object. if human, wont it b better to be tripod-less to move around to shoot angles?
 

Anson

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Jul 31, 2006
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#16
would a tripod be required?
I supposed in a studio since lighting are well setup, plus a ext flash on hotshoe, guess environment should be well lit.

find a tripod will restrict movement, unless shooting an object. if human, wont it b better to be tripod-less to move around to shoot angles?
It have to depend on what you are shooting for. Since most of my studio shoot are for commercial products, often the model is secondary and the clothes & accessories are the center of attraction.

I was not connecting an ext flash on my hotshoe, rather I am attaching a wireless trigger to the hotshoe in order to fire my remote flashes. Often one for the softbox, 2nd a shoot-thru umbrella and third a Lightsphere (chin-light). The product & model are often behind a white backdrop. My shutter speed is set to 1/20 or slower with a cable release.
 

akagi07

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Apr 6, 2006
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#17
well actually, i'm checking out studio photography on youtubes.
I find that essentially almost every video on the studio photography, they all uses ext handheld light meter to measure the lights.

cam built in metering not accurate for such case?

and as what Anson had mentioned, you talked about using 1/20. that's quite dim in studio.. for your setup or that's norm
 

J-Chan

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Sep 21, 2005
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#18
well actually, i'm checking out studio photography on youtubes.
I find that essentially almost every video on the studio photography, they all uses ext handheld light meter to measure the lights.

cam built in metering not accurate for such case?

and as what Anson had mentioned, you talked about using 1/20. that's quite dim in studio.. for your setup or that's norm
cam built in metering systems can't meter for flash exposures.. handheld meters are incident meters instead of reflective meters on cams so they measure the exact amount of light coming on a subject instead of how much light the subject reflects..

plus most studio strobes offer 1/10th stop incremental adjustments, so its not just limited to 1/3th stops on cams..
 

akagi07

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#19
ok. i get your point. thanks
 

Anson

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Jul 31, 2006
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#20
and as what Anson had mentioned, you talked about using 1/20. that's quite dim in studio.. for your setup or that's norm
It really have to depend on your preference and the client requirement. Since I don't have the luxury of using ETTL II, all my flash are adjusted manually. Personally I preferred flash to constant light, and I am using a very small aperture (due to the requirement that everything need to be sharp for poster size print) a tripod had to be used as even the slightest shake is visible in large print. :(
 

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