ID of this bird


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Falcon

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Anyone what is the ID of this bird? Tried searching for it using <A photographic guide to the birds of singapore and M'sia> but cannot seem to find it.

 

Falcon

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Falcon, if I am not mistakened, this is a magpie robin. :)

I think you are right. The book states that it is rare in Singapore so I thought it might be another bird. Also I think this is male. According to book, for female the black parts are replaced by slaty grey.

Thanks!
 

skfoo

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Falcon,

The magpie robin was near extinction/extinct in Singapore some years back.

I heard it has something to do with trees. All trees are the same right? I mean they take in carbon dioxide, provide us oxygen, shade etc etc….Well, the answer is NO!

Magpie robin used to be a fairly common bird in Singapore. They sing beautifully. One fine day, people discovered that they have disappeared! Experts were looped in to check on the phenomena. The findings were that during a period of time, trees were imported from overseas to beautify our garden city. Trees that used to be resident (local trees) in Singapore were pulled down and make way for these imported trees. The magpie robin cannot live well with these imported trees so they left. People started to realize that local trees are important as well and continue to use them as part of city planning. After that, magpie robin seemed to return and plus re-introduction are doing very well in Singapore! This is a good example that teaches us the important of nature conservation. We almost lost a beautiful species that brighten our day with their beautiful songs due to our ignorance! :cool:

Some information on magpie robin in Singapore is available here:

http://www.naturia.per.sg/buloh/birds/Copsychus_saularis.htm
 

Wolfgang

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#5
skfoo said:
Falcon,

The magpie robin was near extinction/extinct in Singapore some years back.

I heard it has something to do with trees. All trees are the same right? I mean they take in carbon dioxide, provide us oxygen, shade etc etc….Well, the answer is NO!

Magpie robin used to be a fairly common bird in Singapore. They sing beautifully. One fine day, people discovered that they have disappeared! Experts were looped in to check on the phenomena. The findings were that during a period of time, trees were imported from overseas to beautify our garden city. Trees that used to be resident (local trees) in Singapore were pulled down and make way for these imported trees. The magpie robin cannot live well with these imported trees so they left. People started to realize that local trees are important as well and continue to use them as part of city planning. After that, magpie robin seemed to return and plus re-introduction are doing very well in Singapore! This is a good example that teaches us the important of nature conservation. We almost lost a beautiful species that brighten our day with their beautiful songs due to our ignorance! :cool:

Some information on magpie robin in Singapore is available here:

http://www.naturia.per.sg/buloh/birds/Copsychus_saularis.htm
:thumbsup: Nicely stated. :)
 

erwinx

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Falcon said:
I think you are right. The book states that it is rare in Singapore so I thought it might be another bird. Also I think this is male. According to book, for female the black parts are replaced by slaty grey.

Thanks!





Hi Falcon, this is the female. The breast is slaty grey. The above pics illustrate the gender differences.
 

Falcon

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Thx for the information, SKfoo and Erwinx.

Guess there is an error in that book. The pic on the book shows a female robin but indicates it as male. That was why I am unsure what they meant by "black parts". Thought they are refering to the wings.
 

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