How you use your flash


kalai.k

New Member
Feb 14, 2007
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Can someone please tell me why increasingly I see photographers using fixed on camera flash with the flash pointed behind the photographer rather than bouncing it forward at the ceiling onto the subject. I see this being practiced by some wedding photographers as well. What is the point of the flash here - someone found a way to redefine physics, a fashion statement or a symbolism of a s***** amateur,. :confused:
 

Octarine

Moderator
Staff member
Jan 3, 2008
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Pasir Ris
1) I'm leaving this post, deleted the other one. For the future, do stay away from cross-posting. Hint: read the guidelines.
2) If you have questions, ask them in a clear, fact-oriented way. Trolling and name-calling will definitely shorten your stay here. It's also detrimental to getting answers and learning something.
3) The size (vulgo: diameter) of the light source defines the quality and other characteristics of the light. Using the wall / ceiling behind gives the largest possible light source in that situation. I recommend you reading up about light modifiers and usage to understand the concept.
 

one eye jack

Senior Member
Jun 11, 2011
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Can someone please tell me why increasingly I see photographers using fixed on camera flash with the flash pointed behind the photographer rather than bouncing it forward at the ceiling onto the subject. I see this being practiced by some wedding photographers as well. What is the point of the flash here - someone found a way to redefine physics, a fashion statement or a symbolism of a s***** amateur,. :confused:
Increasingly? I think you are an available light shooter. Bouncing a flash has been around for decades as far as when I learned the basics of flash photography.

As mod Octarine has hinted, bounce means you are using the larger surface area as a reflector and as is commonly known the larger the area the softer the light which looks pleasing mostly on women's face ( beauty lighting ) as men can take all types of lighting depending on what kind of look you want to create.

That said it assumes that the room is relative small and has low ceiling. Try bouncing in a 200 seater wedding dinner hall with high ceiling and you are not near a side wall. The inverse square law of light comes into play where a doubling of distance a light source is from a subject the power output is decreased to 1/4
If it stayed at the original distance. In reality it just a hit and miss kind of proposition. You may have to use direct flash as choice of bounce surface is not optimal.
It is also assumed the the ceiling and walls are white or off white. If it is any other colour you will have a colour tint in photo like disco lighting..haha.

Anyway here is a basic introduction on bounce flash techniques. Learn to be a master of light . It's how you differentiate yourself from the other photographers.