How Useful is EXIF/Shooting data to you?

How Useful is EXIF/Shooting data to you?


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#1
Hi,

Digital camera uses have their EXIF data, high-end SLR (e.g. Nikon F100, F5, Canon EOS 1V etc) users have their data downloading program (super expensive). But how important is the data to you? Do you REALLY NEED to know what settings you shot each pic with?

Regards
CK
 

SzennyBoy

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#2
The data is very useful to me for assessing what effects the particular settings have on the final image... especially effects of depth-of-field, rear-curtain sync, etc.

Basically it helps you learn from your mistakes! :)
 

Jed

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#3
Originally posted by SzennyBoy
The data is very useful to me for assessing what effects the particular settings have on the final image... especially effects of depth-of-field, rear-curtain sync, etc.
Wow, you have a great amount of equipment for someone still learning from EXIF information!
 

SzennyBoy

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#4
He! He!... I'm always learning... somewhat of a control-freak!:bsmilie:

But seriously, I do alot of macro work (scientific/research) so the depth-of-field data is very important for repeatability of shots when necessary.
 

StreetShooter

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Jan 17, 2002
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#5
The exposure and ISO information which can be found in the EXIF data should be checked just before taking each shot, not after downloading the picture. The effect of the various settings can then be checked on the LCD immediately after taking the shot. This is the best way to improve and learn. After a while, you don't even need to check the LCD preview, because you KNOW how your shot is going to turn out. It also ensures better shots because you are constantly checking your settings.

Most of the other information in the EXIF data such as which camera took the shot and which firmware version the camera used is pretty irrelevant, dontcha think?

The only value I can find in the EXIF data is that it serves as an automatic record for you should you want to check things out say, maybe five years later. Date, time, that sort of stuff. This info is destroyed if you do any image manipulation, so you should always keep a copy of the original image, and save all your PS masterpieces in a separate directory.
 

#6
Originally posted by StreetShooter
The exposure and ISO information which can be found in the EXIF data should be checked just before taking each shot, not after downloading the picture. The effect of the various settings can then be checked on the LCD immediately after taking the shot. This is the best way to improve and learn. After a while, you don't even need to check the LCD preview, because you KNOW how your shot is going to turn out. It also ensures better shots because you are constantly checking your settings.

Most of the other information in the EXIF data such as which camera took the shot and which firmware version the camera used is pretty irrelevant, dontcha think?

The only value I can find in the EXIF data is that it serves as an automatic record for you should you want to check things out say, maybe five years later. Date, time, that sort of stuff. This info is destroyed if you do any image manipulation, so you should always keep a copy of the original image, and save all your PS masterpieces in a separate directory.
Right. People have been shooting film for longer than I live, and film never had EXIF data. When they require shooting info, they record them on a $1 notebook. Most people usually shoot with a particular setting for a particular situation, so remembering them is no big deal. 99% of the time, I never had to refer to the EXIF data from my Coolpix images. :)

Regards
CK
 

jasonpgc

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#7
I used to record my the exposure on a small notebook and compare them with pictures taken at various lighting conditions. Eventually, I know my own metering style and how to vary it to change the mood for a scene.

Since I can approximately predict the result on film during manual metering, the data is not that important to me now. If there is an slight over or under in the exposure, I compensate manually the next time a similar situation occurs.

However, if the camera came with such functions without too high a price, I bet I won't be able to resist the temptation
 

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