How to take colour-rich photos?


Status
Not open for further replies.
Mar 30, 2009
13
0
0
#1
Hi,

I understand that grass in Singapore is not the greenest of all but I can't help but noticed many pros posting very colour-rich pictures here. Are they edited by photoshop? Or we can actually take very colour-rich pictures with our camera? I'm using 450D with kit lens and need advices to take colour-rich pictures. Comments are greatly appreciated!
 

coolin

New Member
Sep 1, 2008
400
0
0
27
Pasir Ris
#2
you can up the saturation in-camera , or you can increase it in post-processing.
 

kriz91

New Member
Jun 25, 2009
10
0
0
#3
You can play around with Vibrance, Saturation etc. in many post processing softwares.
 

dorts

Senior Member
Mar 10, 2007
2,204
1
38
SG
#6
It could also be due to the lighting at that point of time. Different direction. intensity, contast of the light can make a difference in the saturation of your colours. :)

Of course, photoshop will get you your saturation too.
 

Octarine

Moderator
Staff member
Jan 3, 2008
12,544
33
48
Pasir Ris
#7
It could also be due to the lighting at that point of time. Different direction. intensity, contast of the light can make a difference in the saturation of your colours. :)
Second that! Before messing around with images in PS or LR let's make sure that the light captured is of good quality. Also, let's not forget that colour-rich photos are not always needed.
 

Sivakis

New Member
Sep 26, 2008
569
0
0
#11
I second the Saturation / Hue correction in CameraRaw as well. Bumping it up +2 to +3 immediately shows results.
 

m3lv1nh0

Senior Member
Sep 24, 2007
2,225
0
0
40
Serangoon North
#12
To make grass look greener.. increase saturation of Yellow instead of green. Than increase contrast to taste.
 

Diavonex

Senior Member
Sep 23, 2008
3,641
0
0
Admiralty
#13
With correct lighting and exposure we should be able to get colour-rich photos. (the subject must be colour-rich in the first place).
 

2evans

New Member
Nov 8, 2007
1,862
0
0
#14
Good lighting is also important... i.e. shooting at noon won't typically give you good colours as the lighting is usually harsh.
 

zac08

Senior Member
Feb 21, 2005
11,755
0
0
East
#17
It's all about the light and the exposure... make sure it's exposed properly... when it's under-exposed, all the colours will look very dull....
 

alvinz

New Member
May 1, 2006
10
0
0
#18
My friends always recommend me to look out for places with strong contrasting primary colours in one scene, e.g a scene where it has bright blue, red and yellow colours, quite aptly illustrated by the 2 pictures above, but of course good lighting and exposure is very important as well.

One place i would recommend is little india with its richly diversed cultural icons and colours and also, do keep a lookout for fruit stalls with its mutlicoloured fruits layout. It should turn out quite nice.
 

smile_gerard

Senior Member
Jan 18, 2006
611
0
16
Singapore
#19
Not sure if you can change the colour curve in your camera. I know it can be done for nikon cameras. It was a great help to my old D70. You might want to consider doing hdr shots.
 

calebk

Senior Member
Jul 25, 2006
10,594
0
0
Clementi
#20
Not sure if you can change the colour curve in your camera. I know it can be done for nikon cameras. It was a great help to my old D70. You might want to consider doing hdr shots.
HDR is to overcome the limited dynamic range of a digital sensor. Has nothing to do with getting more punch in colours.
 

Status
Not open for further replies.
Top Bottom