How to take a clear photo?


Mar 22, 2015
12
0
0
Singapore
#1
Hello Seniors,

Just like to know if it is possible to take a clear pic zoomed at 200mm with aperture 22 without tripod? When I moved a little, the screen on the camera sensed and showed quite alot of movement, therefore making the photo very blur when I take one.

I am using a Panasonic 45-200mm with OIS switched on.

Please provide me with guidance, with your experience, on roughly which aperture to use or to zoom or not for taking:
1) landscapes and
2) wildlife.

Thanks!
Melissa
Noob
 

Oct 29, 2014
114
3
18
Clementi
#2
Hey Melissa,

I would assume you are using a micro four thirds system, so judging by crop factor and focal length, 2.0*200=400, you will require a shutter speed of 1/400 or higher depending on lighting conditions. Generally the faster the shutter speed, the clearer your image should be. Having a brighter environment (more light) will allow you to have a faster shutter speed while keeping a constant aperture and ISO as compared to a dimly lit environment (less light).

1) For landscapes 45mm on a micro four third isn't exactly the best choice considering its relative narrow field of view, so no, I wouldn't recommend zooming in, keep it at 45mm for the widest angle (field of view). F/11 to F/16 will be good since there may be diffraction at smaller apertures such as F/22 (not very noticeable but will affect sharpness of image). Do get a tripod for landscapes though, as low light with small apertures will result in much slower shutter speeds of even 1/2, making it even harder to hand hold the camera. Use a remote (wired or wireless both works fine) to reduce motion caused by the pressing of the shutter button at such low shutter speeds.
2) For wildlife you can zoom in all the way to 200mm if you like. It's really about the look of the picture you are going for. Just go for your maximum aperture (e.g. F/5.6 at 200mm). More light = Faster shutter speed without high ISOs (which may result in grainy images).

Have fun shooting, and don't let the technical aspects limit your creativity!
 

Mar 22, 2015
12
0
0
Singapore
#3
Hi pwnies5600, thanks for your reply.

Yes, I'm using a Panasonic GF6 Aperture mode with auto ISO setting. I do have a kit lens of 14-45mm.
So from what you said about landscapes, I assume that I should be using 14mm to shoot?

Thanks again for your advice.
Melissa
 

Dura77

New Member
Dec 18, 2013
277
2
0
Singapore
#4
There's no hard and fast rule on which focal length to use for landscapes. But in general, most people would want to capture as much of the scene as possible, so for your case, yes you could shoot at 14mm. But do not limit it to just that focal length. Going for a more tele (aka more zoom e.g. @45mm) may give a different perspective.

And I'm not sure why you would want to shoot at f22 at 200mm? I assume it's due to wanting everything to be in focus at that focal length? But it's quite impractical to do so and unless it's extremely bright, I highly doubt it's possible to get a clear shot without introducing excessive noise with those settings.

Since you're already using a micro 4/3 camera, the depth of field you would get is already quite large compared to a full frame camera. So if you are taking landscapes, around f8 to f11 would be optimal, max f16. Any further would probably result in diffraction or your photos being not as sharp. And if possible, use a tripod.

Happy shooting! :)
 

daredevil123

Moderator
Staff member
Oct 25, 2005
21,662
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48
lil red dot
#6
TS, you need to understand the basics of exposure... why do you want to shoot at F22 anyway? What are you trying to achieve?
 

Mar 22, 2015
12
0
0
Singapore
#7
I'm just trying out different aperture at different lengths


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catchlights

Moderator
Staff member
Sep 27, 2004
21,903
46
48
Punggol, Singapore
www.foto-u.com
#8
To take clear photos, you need a clear understanding on photography basis.

I recommend you to read this book. it is available, in our National Library.




Understanding Exposure: How to Shoot Great Photographs with Any Camera, by Bryan Peterson.



You are asking what settings to use to shoot... whatever subjects, without the basic knowledge of photography, is like copying the model answers from the behind of assignment books, you can get correct answer, but you are not learning.
 

Mar 22, 2015
12
0
0
Singapore
#9
Ok, I'll find out about that book. Thank you for your advice.


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nitewalk

Moderator
Staff member
May 31, 2010
4,647
35
48
Singapore
#10
Hi Melissa, i think for m43 diffraction will start to set in after f8 so by f22 sharpness will be affected. As mentioned, do take note of your shutter speed too.

For focal length, i guess it depends on what you want to achieve for landscapes. You can shoot on tele end, as it can show a closer perspective and depending on how you compose you might be able to focus more on what you want to show. I've never really shot on tele end as i find myself unable to compose well on that end so generally i keep to ultrawide.

In some instances, where going wide gives a poor composition (eg. Too wide and hence includes too many elements in your photo), the general zoom range which your kit lens gives would be helpful. Like above mentioned, there really isn't a right and wrong. It just has to make sense and appeal aesthetically. :)
 

Mar 22, 2015
12
0
0
Singapore
#11
Appreciate your kind advice, nitewalk. Thanks! [emoji4]


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daredevil123

Moderator
Staff member
Oct 25, 2005
21,662
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lil red dot
#12
Just to add, if you are shooting landscapes at tele, most of the elements in your picture should be quite faraway, then there is no worry about thin depth of field. F8 will do.

An example: The first and last pictures in the link http://www.zcool.com.cn/work/ZMTIxODkyNDg=.html
are shot at 200mm at F8. No issues with dof.
 

Last edited:

Nikonzen

Senior Member
Nov 3, 2014
2,570
13
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Oklahoma, USA
#13
TS there are two situations where DOF does not have to be accounted for...in other words everything will be in focus no matter what aperture you use. This is where nuance comes in... :)

1. When the objects in a scene are all very far away...

2. When the object is a single plane eg. something against a wall...

Either situation f2.8 or f16 it doesn't matter...focus is achieved.
 

Last edited:
Mar 22, 2015
12
0
0
Singapore
#14
Thanks daredevil123 and Nikonzen, will take note of that. [emoji5]️


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one eye jack

Senior Member
Jun 11, 2011
820
12
18
#15
Hello Seniors,

Just like to know if it is possible to take a clear pic zoomed at 200mm with aperture 22 without tripod? When I moved a little, the screen on the camera sensed and showed quite alot of movement, therefore making the photo very blur when I take one.

I am using a Panasonic 45-200mm with OIS switched on.

Please provide me with guidance, with your experience, on roughly which aperture to use or to zoom or not for taking:
1) landscapes and
2) wildlife.

Thanks!
Melissa
Noob

Food for thought. Wide angle is not the only lens for landscape.;)

http://www.school-of-digital-photog...telephoto-lenses-for-shooting-landscapes.html

https://photographylife.com/using-telephoto-lenses-for-landscape-photography

http://www.lightharmony.com/blog/landscape-photograpy-with-telephoto-lenses-31.html

http://www.cambridgeincolour.com/tutorials/telephoto-lenses.htm

http://www.andymumford.co.uk/blog/using-a-telephoto-for-landscapes/
 

Mar 22, 2015
12
0
0
Singapore
#16
Nice tips you have here. Thanks, one eye jack! [emoji4]


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ziggy

Senior Member
May 24, 2006
830
4
18
East
#17
I have shot m43 cameras with 200mm-300mm lenses with OIS. To get sharp photos even with OIS you need higher shutter speeds of at least 1/500 to 1/1000 if you do not use a tripod or monopod. Aperture can be f5.6-f8. However wildlife like birds are often under shade so you will end up with ISO of probably 3200 giving noisy images.

If noise is not too much of an issue, then shooting handheld with the above settings is OK. Learn to hold the camera steady by propping up against a tree trunk, wall, etc. If your live view image is shaking too much that it is difficult to focus, it means that you need to hold it steadier. Also use spot metering for more accurate exposure.

But if you want less noisy images, use lower ISO by using at least a light weight compact monopod. It's better than nothing but best results is still with a tripod.
 

Mar 22, 2015
12
0
0
Singapore
#18
Appreciate you for sharing some tips with me, ziggy. [emoji5]️


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Nikonzen

Senior Member
Nov 3, 2014
2,570
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Oklahoma, USA
#19
I have never shot any focal length past 135mm. I have always been under the impression that when one gets way out there, say 200mm plus, it requires some type of steady platform, monopod, tripod, whatever. Do you all find this to be true?
 

daredevil123

Moderator
Staff member
Oct 25, 2005
21,662
68
48
lil red dot
#20
I have never shot any focal length past 135mm. I have always been under the impression that when one gets way out there, say 200mm plus, it requires some type of steady platform, monopod, tripod, whatever. Do you all find this to be true?
If you can maintain 1/focal length shutter speed rule it should be ok without extra support.
 

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