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How to stop camera shake?


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jsbn

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Jul 24, 2002
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Planet Eropagnis
#1
Realised that all my test shots taken at high ISO, no flash tend to be blur due to camera shake.

Besides using a tripod and remote shuttle, how do u guys eliminate camera shake without the use of a tripod? I've been going crazy over blurred photos cos my hand tends to shake a little... :cry:

Any tips? :(
 

clive

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Oct 9, 2002
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#2
these are all the proven methods:

1.tripod
2.monopod
3. IS/VR
4.high ISO
5.large aperture
6.hold steadier
7.use heavier camera body
8.lean against some other form of firm and stationary support


9.learn from me the "art of impossible handholding"...hehehe! :D :bsmilie:
 

clive

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#4
hmmm flash can freeze subject to a certain extent but cannot freeze backgrd shake :)
 

SzennyBoy

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Mar 3, 2002
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#5
Control your breathing, similar to technique taught during NS for shooting on the M16. Stabilise breath to regular pace, breathe in, hold, squeeze trigger, breathe out...

Also, try to tuck-in your elbows to get a firmer holding stance. Flying-elbows will be prone to weak arm support resulting in arms/hands shaking.

If possible, use surrounding supports to add stability, things such as benches, lamp posts, cars, etc... I sometimes even adopt the "proned" position to get a very stable shooting posture.
 

zedwerkz

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Jun 13, 2004
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#6
Yes, controlling your breathing can make a world of difference, the other thing u can do is to train your wrist power. Go get those hand grips used to train grip strength, it will help to lessen your handshake, or do more pullups, the stronger your grip/wrist strength, the lesser the chance of handshake. Plus u have the added benefit of being able to carry more things around :-Þ
 

jsbn

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Jul 24, 2002
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#7
Wow! Thanks for all ur methods! I hope I can get it right next time I shoot without a tripod! :)
 

P

Phildate

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#9
Like Solid Snake, use Tamazipan (i.e. Valium or other anti-depressent!!)
 

Mar 13, 2004
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#12
beyond a good tripod and a firm grip, did some experimenting, thought to share these, the results surprise me-self sometime for i can go as low as 1/8 without extra support..

1. instead of gripping tightly, try to use "tai-chi" style grip. by this, i mean to relax your fingers and mould them into the base of the camera - "encompass" it instead of strangling it literally. notice that i can better control/handle the camera without getting too fatigued quickly. it becomes an extension of your fingers/arms. haha :bigeyes:

2. speaking of fatigue, try to compose your shot before you hold up the cam and try to jingle jungle while squinting into the miniature eyepiece. this way, you would reduce the "load-on" time. think very useful for those with heavier "cannons".. :blah:

3. at the point of snapping, envision yourself in a free space, where everything is weightless and theres no return force. hold this thought as you depress the shutter button in full GENTLY!! and you can sometime reduce this last min "shake potential"

well, maybe useful, maybe not...my two pennies for contribution
 

Dec 25, 2003
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#13
I read from somewhere that suggested using the camera timer. I tried it and it works very well for a newbie like me! The 2 seconds timer on my A80 helps to eliminate the camera shake when i press the shutter. Not exactly the most 'pro' thing to do but it works!
 

#14
One trick for releasing the shutter, don't snap down on the shutter release button. Instead, roll your index finger over it and gradually apply the finger pressure on it. This way there is a smooth transition of pressure to activate the shutter with the jerky force that would otherwise cause jolt the camera... causing camera shake on the moment of shutter release. This is especially so for the lighter camera bodies.
 

Witness

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Mar 18, 2004
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#15
Control your breathing, similar to technique taught during NS for shooting on the M16. Stabilise breath to regular pace, breathe in, hold, squeeze trigger, breathe out...

Also, try to tuck-in your elbows to get a firmer holding stance. Flying-elbows will be prone to weak arm support resulting in arms/hands shaking.

If possible, use surrounding supports to add stability, things such as benches, lamp posts, cars, etc... I sometimes even adopt the "proned" position to get a very stable shooting posture.
sounds like firing a rifle....same technique la aghha
 

bsplenden

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Mar 25, 2004
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#16
compose first... place ur finger on the button. breathe in. and let out a bit of air so that there is nt so much air in ur lungs and u feel comfy... press gently... if u not using the continuos shot function, just press and hold it there... it does not really matter... if press and release, got even more shake... esp if u using low shutter speed...
 

Ah Pao

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Nov 7, 2003
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#17
Redstar202 said:
I read from somewhere that suggested using the camera timer. I tried it and it works very well for a newbie like me! The 2 seconds timer on my A80 helps to eliminate the camera shake when i press the shutter. Not exactly the most 'pro' thing to do but it works!
No lah, where got 'pro' or 'not pro' one? :bsmilie: As long as it works decently can already! This is the best option when you don't have a remote release cable for taking long exposure shots.
 

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