how to soften the flash lifht ?


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andre

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Hi guyz,

can someone share his/her esperience in "how to soften the flash light"... So ar i only know to use the difuser or "tissue"...and EV compensation. Any other ?

-Andre
 

ckiang

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Originally posted by andre
Hi guyz,

can someone share his/her esperience in "how to soften the flash light"... So ar i only know to use the difuser or "tissue"...and EV compensation. Any other ?

-Andre
Changing the flash output (via EV compensation) does not soften the light, it just makes it less bright. The ONLY way to soften any light source is to increase it's area. Small, point-source light sources are usually harsh.

To increase the area of the lightsource, and thus soften it, you can either bounce the flash off a ceiling/wall, a bounce card or both. Or you can use a softbox.

Regards
CK
 

ziploc

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Or use a Stofen Omnibounce.
 

ziploc

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Originally posted by ckiang


Unfortunately, unless you have something (like a ceiling and walls) to bounce off, it doesn't soften much when used in direct mode. :(

Regards
CK
I think so, as the leaflet that came with it mentioned not to use it for direct mode too. However, I've achieved good results in macro shots by using it on an SB25 together with wide angle diffusing plate.
 

Kho King

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Originally posted by ckiang


Unfortunately, unless you have something (like a ceiling and walls) to bounce off, it doesn't soften much when used in direct mode. :(

Regards
CK
It is incorrect to use the Omni bounce in direct mode. I have tried using the flash in direct mode and the results is very harsh flash...as if using direct flash without the Omni bounce. Upon checking with the company, their suggestion is to tilt the flash 60 degree, and the results is definitely much better. I tilt my SB26 at 45~60 degree when using Omni bounce, no need a ceiling or wall to bounce the light.

Another alternative is the Lumiquest pocket bouncer.
 

kraterz

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Ive been using Stofen omnibounce for abt a year but results are not great- not much better than direct flash. Best to use a softbox or bounce off cieling or wall.
 

ckiang

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Originally posted by Kho King


It is incorrect to use the Omni bounce in direct mode. I have tried using the flash in direct mode and the results is very harsh flash...as if using direct flash without the Omni bounce. Upon checking with the company, their suggestion is to tilt the flash 60 degree, and the results is definitely much better. I tilt my SB26 at 45~60 degree when using Omni bounce, no need a ceiling or wall to bounce the light.

Another alternative is the Lumiquest pocket bouncer.
Huh? If you have nothing to bounce off from, what's the use of tilting then? From experience, even the Pocket Bouncer does not give very good results. :(

Talking about tilting flash heads, I saw this supposedly pro photog at a Bugis Junction event using a DCS 520 (or whatever the Canon version is), 28-70L and 550EX, shooting at kids, etc with a tilted flash head (no omnibounce, just direct flash). And he's bracketing the tilt as well. Dunno what he's trying to do, but sure is funny to watch. :D

Regards
CK
 

Kho King

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Originally posted by ckiang


Huh? If you have nothing to bounce off from, what's the use of tilting then?
Hi CK,
The design of Omni Bounce is that it can spread the light soft and wide, not using the bounce from ceiling or wall. It is the design of the box/cover itself. The Omni-Bounce creates a Diffused Bare Bulb Effect. Giving even coverage across the entire frame, with lenses from 15mm to 200mm in the 35mm format. The reason to tilt it is to have the softer light hitting the subject, as the harsh light will still be concentrating on the straight head.
 

ckiang

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Originally posted by Kho King


Hi CK,
The design of Omni Bounce is that it can spread the light soft and wide, not using the bounce from ceiling or wall. It is the design of the box/cover itself. The Omni-Bounce creates a Diffused Bare Bulb Effect. Giving even coverage across the entire frame, with lenses from 15mm to 200mm in the 35mm format. The reason to tilt it is to have the softer light hitting the subject, as the harsh light will still be concentrating on the straight head.
Well, the website gives me the impression you HAVE to bounce off something. ;p

Regards
CK
 

Kho King

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Originally posted by ckiang


Well, the website gives me the impression you HAVE to bounce off something. ;p

Regards
CK
Maybe for a not so powerful flash, or if the subject is too far away...then you might need a wall or ceiling to get more light bounce onto the subject. From what I have shot, I just mount the Omni bounce onto my flash (SB26), and shoot. It gives pleasant soft light to portrait...and even soft light to macro photography too.
 

Larry

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i've used both the Lumiquest pocket bouncer and the Stofen Omnibounce before... the pocket bouncer gives harsher shadows (and it makes your setup very drama as it sticks up of the flash like half a foot), and the Omnibounce gives softer shadow (used at a 45 degree angel) but you have to compensate more. i usually use the pocket bouncer in low-light indoor situations and the omnibounce for to supplement light in like cloudy outdoor weather.
 

Bean

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Originally posted by Kho King


Hi CK,
The design of Omni Bounce is that it can spread the light soft and wide, not using the bounce from ceiling or wall. It is the design of the box/cover itself. The Omni-Bounce creates a Diffused Bare Bulb Effect. Giving even coverage across the entire frame, with lenses from 15mm to 200mm in the 35mm format. The reason to tilt it is to have the softer light hitting the subject, as the harsh light will still be concentrating on the straight head.
I've also heard from a salesman from CP that when using the Omni-Bounce, you need to increase the EV of the flash by 2 stops to get a corrected lighting from a 45 degrees tilted angle.

Just want to ask, if one is using TTL, is it still necessary to compensate the flash exposure? :dunno:

Second question, I'm using a F601 plus SB26 setup which do not allow +2 EV flash output (Maximum only +1EV). What do you do to 'force' that 1 extra stop of light coming out from the flash? :dunno:

 

jasonpgc

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Go and buy a huge piece of A2 white card board from popular book store, then get yourself a off camera shoe cord.

Positioning the card board to the left or right of your subject and
then bounce the flash off the card board. I did this for all my outdoor fill flash. Since the card board is larger than the subject's face, she'll have softer shadows on her.

Remember always that a soft box soften a subject simply because it is position very close to the subject and the area of the light source is larger. Any thing that is physically smaller than your subjects face is considered to be a point source unless you bounce it off an area larger than your subject.

The omnibounce or pocket bouncer is a point source unless you bounce it on the wall, which will defects the purpose of putting it up in 1st place.
 

ckiang

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Originally posted by Bean


I've also heard from a salesman from CP that when using the Omni-Bounce, you need to increase the EV of the flash by 2 stops to get a corrected lighting from a 45 degrees tilted angle.

Just want to ask, if one is using TTL, is it still necessary to compensate the flash exposure? :dunno:

Second question, I'm using a F601 plus SB26 setup which do not allow +2 EV flash output (Maximum only +1EV). What do you do to 'force' that 1 extra stop of light coming out from the flash? :dunno:

The OmniBounce loses 2 stops of light. But if you are using a TTL system, the loss is automatically taken care of, so you do not need extra compensation. So, to your 2nd question, you don't really have to worry.

Regards
CK
 

ziploc

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TTL will take care of the exposure. But that max. distance that the flash can reach is shorten.
 

erwinx

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I am not so sure that the omnibounce diffuses light when angled at 45 degrees with no surface to bounce off. (my own experience is it doesn't improve things) But if there are shooting situations where it does, I'm guessing that the improvement may come from the fact that when you tilt the flash at 45 degrees, you're moving it further off camera (granted the physical position change is small, but depending on subject distance the angle at which the light is now hitting the subject may change perceptibly?)

(i.e., equivalent to the improvement made by moving a flash slightly off camera though the flash is obviously, still direct.)


I took the following shots with the coolpix 995 built it flash but supplemented with an off camera flash.

http://forums.clubsnap.org/showthread.php?s=&threadid=4761 (tripodasia... patience required)
 

Ian

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Originally posted by andre
Hi guyz,

can someone share his/her esperience in "how to soften the flash light"... So ar i only know to use the difuser or "tissue"...and EV compensation. Any other ?

-Andre
EV compensation won't soften the light.

My preferred methods are (use these a lot)

Tissue over the flash fitted with a diffuser panel.

Lumiquest 80-20 bouncer. Big but softens light a bit better than an Omnibounce in most cases.

16-20" Brolly. Haven't seen these avaiable for a while but were freely available in the 70s. they attach via a seiglite bracket and it gives you a portable camera mounted brolly. Works very well with TTL systems. The main disadvantage is the size of the setup and expense.

Side reflectors.
3 foot square White cardboard or similar panels. Works a treat for bouncing flash off outdoors.

Fullsize brollies and reflectors
My prefered method for location shooting of people.
 

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