How to shoot in manual mode???


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Nov 15, 2004
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#1
hi guys. i wanna try manual mode after much use of A mode. just like to know if i need to know Sunny 16 rules? or just depend on my camera to meter?? coz my nightshots r quite crappy. heard that manual can help.
 

user111

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Jul 27, 2004
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#4
memorise some common exposures
 

solarii

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Oct 20, 2005
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#5
user111 said:
memorise some common exposures
Agreed. For night scenes, especially in the city, it pretty hard to find 18% grey tones...you scenes consist mostly of just shadows or highlights from the various light sources. Camera meters aren't very accurate in those circumstances... so its basically calculated trial and error.

Also, the "correct" exposure may not produce the best result... sometimes a little over or under exposure will look better. My advice is to bracket (ard 1 stop +/-) from the given exposure. Review your results, reshoot if necessary. Works for me.
 

helfizad

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#6
hmm quite confusing... (from the link providedl).... is it.. from f16... u either up or minus the fstop??that means smaller no and bigger no???
 

catchlights

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#7
you may notice there are more plus than minus.

So from f16, plus one stop(open one stop) is set it to f11, plus two stops is set it to f8, so on and so forth.
 

Dec 11, 2005
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#8
helfizad said:
hmm quite confusing... (from the link providedl).... is it.. from f16... u either up or minus the fstop??that means smaller no and bigger no???
Bro the bigger the aperture number the smaller the aperture. That means if you're on f16 and you want to close up one stop, stop down one stop, reduce the exposure by one stop, or underexpose by one stop, you go to f22.

The best and most accurate method is of course to use a light meter. But you do not have one and you want to shoot night scenes, the best you can do is aim at the part of the scene you want to be exposed most accurately and meter off something there that is as close to the grey as you possibly can. If you have to, walk there and meter off your skin. Er..this does not work if you're indian, or even a dark skinned malay. No offence to Indian or Malay Bros here.
 

emcee

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Oct 3, 2004
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#10
helfizad said:
how abt the shutter speed?.... u plus or minus a few stop?
this also exactly wat i dun undersatand.

In the top portion, it mentioned that the shutter speed deoends on the film ISO. With all the plus /minus I only do it on the F/stop and keep the shutter speed.
 

Michael

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#11
why the heck should shooting in manual mode be different from A or S mode?

in A mode you choose aperture and the camera chooses the shutter speed based on ISO settings, exposure compensation settings and the reading from the light meter.

in S mode you choose shutter speed and the camera chooses the aperture based on ISO settings, exposure compensation settings and the reading from the light meter.

in M mode you choose either aperture or shutter speed and then adjust the other one based on the readings you get from the light meter. The reading depends on your ISO and exposure compensation settings. The reading from the light meter is normally given in the view finder in analog stule (Nikon FM3A, needle and circle) or with plus/minus signs (most of the recent cameras). Depending on the camera model, the light meter tells you in fractions of EV how much under or overexposed your current settings are.

The setting of you light meter affects the whole thing of course as well but not different as in A or S mode (or for that matter even in P mode). Exposure will be different if you use matrix, centre weight or spot meter mode.

So to come to an end, shooting in M mode adds one more thing to do to get the same result. For most of the cases it does not make sense to use M mode. You may want to use it if you want to stitch panoramic shots together from individual shots to preserve similar light conditions throughout the picture. Another application is night and low light conditions or repro work. Other than that its more of a hassel in 35mm cameras.
 

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Phildate

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#12
Michael said:
why the heck should shooting in manual mode be different from A or S mode?

in A mode you choose aperture and the camera chooses the shutter speed based on ISO settings, exposure compensation settings and the reading from the light meter.

in S mode you choose shutter speed and the camera chooses the aperture based on ISO settings, exposure compensation settings and the reading from the light meter.

in M mode you choose either aperture or shutter speed and then adjust the other one based on the readings you get from the light meter. The reading depends on your ISO and exposure compensation settings. The reading from the light meter is normally given in the view finder in analog stule (Nikon FM3A, needle and circle) or with plus/minus signs (most of the recent cameras). Depending on the camera model, the light meter tells you in fractions of EV how much under or overexposed your current settings are.

The setting of you light meter affects the whole thing of course as well but not different as in A or S mode (or for that matter even in P mode). Exposure will be different if you use matrix, centre weight or spot meter mode.

So to come to an end, shooting in M mode adds one more thing to do to get the same result. For most of the cases it does not make sense to use M mode. You may want to use it if you want to stitch panoramic shots together from individual shots to preserve similar light conditions throughout the picture. Another application is night and low light conditions or repro work. Other than that its more of a hassel in 35mm cameras.
I agree - most camera's in-built metering systems are excellent, even at night and there is no need for a trial and error appraoch. Just use A mode but watch to ensure the 30" doesn't flash, indicating under-exposure. If in doubt, shoot in RAW so you can tweak the exposure afterwards.

Manual mode is very useful for studio work but apart from that, I use A mode 99% of the time.
 

catchlights

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#13
helfizad said:
how abt the shutter speed?.... u plus or minus a few stop?
emcee said:
this also exactly wat i dun undersatand.

In the top portion, it mentioned that the shutter speed deoends on the film ISO. With all the plus /minus I only do it on the F/stop and keep the shutter speed.
When it is under direct sun light (Sunny f16), if you using ISO 100, so you will be using speed 125s of 100s, f-stop is at f16, you also can use

250s, f11
500s, f8
1000s, f5.6.........etc to get the same exposure

So in all, you only need to memorize one thing, plus or minus how many stops from BDE for certain kind of lighting condition, so you can adjust the f stop or/and speed accordingly to get the setting you want/able to use.
 

catchlights

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#14
One more thing I would like to add,


Some people complain that Sunny f16 is not accurate, most of the time is misinterpret the description of the lighting condition, eg, light cloudy day as sunny day, inside the woods as under shade etc.
 

#15
Phildate said:
I agree - most camera's in-built metering systems are excellent, even at night and there is no need for a trial and error appraoch. Just use A mode but watch to ensure the 30" doesn't flash, indicating under-exposure. If in doubt, shoot in RAW so you can tweak the exposure afterwards.

Manual mode is very useful for studio work but apart from that, I use A mode 99% of the time.
I usually use the in-built metering to determine the exposure, instead of some rules. Common rules are just used as a guideline.

I set the metering to spot metering, and focus on the particular spot where I want to expose for, note the metering and set it to somewhere in the middle +/- 1 stop, depending on the kind of effect I want to achieve.

Of course, it also depends on situation too.
 

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