how to shoot for sports?


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Oct 31, 2006
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#1
sports day in my skool on the 20th. i just got EOS 300d from my friend today. tested abit. can see differences once i set ISO. i'm at home, so havent test outside yet.

anyone with same model or not, can advise me on what settings should i use? dont worry i will understand. i got e manual in my hand, easy to follow.

slow shutter speed all these? would appreciate tips. i wna shoot running, finishing line, and people's faces focused but blurred bg etc. and candid stressed up faces too.
 

zj2000

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Mar 10, 2007
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#2
What lens do you currently have? Try to shoot at the largest aperture (smallest f number) and af in ai-servo mode.....
 

Oct 31, 2006
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#3
What lens do you currently have? Try to shoot at the largest aperture (smallest f number) and af in ai-servo mode.....
efs 17-85mm. not big but still works. i'm not shooting from far though.
 

Jan 10, 2008
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#4
Erm, if possible, set the Manual Focusing point to the middle... faster focusing on the subject. You can always recompose during pp.
 

#5
My set up for sport is
-change single to continue shot
-af-s to af-c
-shuttle speed ard 1/60~1/40 to get blur effect
-half press, follow the subject
if wan all sharp, then higher up iso and get high shuttle speed
Cheers
 

Oct 31, 2006
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#6
pardon me. but continue shot is the many frames right?

what's af-s to af-c?
 

zoossh

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Nov 29, 2005
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#7
pardon me. but continue shot is the many frames right?

what's af-s to af-c?
tracking of focus. once you fix your focus point, AF-S will fix the focus at that (single) distance no matter how you frame, while AF-C will automatically continuously track the subject that is in focus as it moves, maintaining the subject in focus until you snap the shutter release.
 

lukesky

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Oct 28, 2004
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#8
AF-S and AF-C are nikon terms rite? threadstarter using Canon leh. Or does Canon use the same terms?
 

raptor84

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Dec 6, 2005
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#9
On canon its called AI-Servo but be warned that the tracking ona 300D is not very accurate... should be okas your DOF is still quite large.
 

night86mare

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Aug 25, 2006
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#10
sports day in my skool on the 20th. i just got EOS 300d from my friend today. tested abit. can see differences once i set ISO. i'm at home, so havent test outside yet.

anyone with same model or not, can advise me on what settings should i use? dont worry i will understand. i got e manual in my hand, easy to follow.

slow shutter speed all these? would appreciate tips. i wna shoot running, finishing line, and people's faces focused but blurred bg etc. and candid stressed up faces too.
there are 2 ways to shoot sports,

1) freezing of motion
-wide open, or near wide open
-fastest shutter speed that is appropriate, don't have to be super fast because these are people still
-adjust iso accordingly
-use flash if possible
-the key point here is shutter speed, should be as quick as possible to freeze motion, but not necessarily to the extent of 1/4000 second
-anticipate the correct moment, and click before it happens
-focus potentially a problem

2) panning/capture of motion
-not quite as easy to execute, needs experience
-shutter speed can be extended, but to a certain extent that does not bring hand shake into the equation
-variable aperture and iso, your choice, depends on how good your panning is
-flash should not be used, will give ghosting effect
-extended shutter speed and proper panning will give you a relatively sharp subject with a blurred background to intorduce "sense of motion"
-key here is your panning.. learn how to do it, where to do it, and well, do it.
 

Oct 31, 2006
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#11
there are 2 ways to shoot sports,

1) freezing of motion
-wide open, or near wide open
-fastest shutter speed that is appropriate, don't have to be super fast because these are people still
-adjust iso accordingly
-use flash if possible
-the key point here is shutter speed, should be as quick as possible to freeze motion, but not necessarily to the extent of 1/4000 second
-anticipate the correct moment, and click before it happens
-focus potentially a problem

2) panning/capture of motion
-not quite as easy to execute, needs experience
-shutter speed can be extended, but to a certain extent that does not bring hand shake into the equation
-variable aperture and iso, your choice, depends on how good your panning is
-flash should not be used, will give ghosting effect
-extended shutter speed and proper panning will give you a relatively sharp subject with a blurred background to intorduce "sense of motion"
-key here is your panning.. learn how to do it, where to do it, and well, do it.
i'm going with 1. i tried 2 few days ago but failed. blurry, due to slightest handshakes. probably i'm not using the full use of shutter speed, aperture and iso. i tried it at night, no time in e day. will practice 2 on cars in e day.

tried 2 for cars and failed, after playing with apertures, shutters and ISOs. will try more.
 

night86mare

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Aug 25, 2006
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#12
i'm going with 1. i tried 2 few days ago but failed. blurry, due to slightest handshakes. probably i'm not using the full use of shutter speed, aperture and iso. i tried it at night, no time in e day. will practice 2 on cars in e day.

tried 2 for cars and failed, after playing with apertures, shutters and ISOs. will try more.
at night it might be pretty hard to pan, since there is not enough light available.. i would imagine that panning at night might require significant exposure timings which would be literally impossible to do.

actually even at night 1 might not be quite easy.. lighting is not suitable at all, maybe if you want to shoot cars at night, make sure you are positioned at a location where the lighting is brighter, i.e. at the spot where there is lamppost? :dunno:
 

Oct 31, 2006
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#13
at night it might be pretty hard to pan, since there is not enough light available.. i would imagine that panning at night might require significant exposure timings which would be literally impossible to do.

actually even at night 1 might not be quite easy.. lighting is not suitable at all, maybe if you want to shoot cars at night, make sure you are positioned at a location where the lighting is brighter, i.e. at the spot where there is lamppost? :dunno:
no wonder. my exp and aperture dont want to accept my settings at all. cause not enough light. and e lamp post didnt help either. i will try in e day maybe tmr.

can't wait to shoot tmr. i will come back soon with pics of tmr or later. since my flash card reader is not transferring to my comp. tsk. i dont care how bad pics tmr might be, i just started on dslr. ;)
 

night86mare

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#14
can't wait to shoot tmr. i will come back soon with pics of tmr or later. since my flash card reader is not transferring to my comp. tsk. i dont care how bad pics tmr might be, i just started on dslr. ;)
yes, even dslrs have limits.

just keep shooting, and being self-critical (not overly so though).. and you will improve in no time. :) practice makes perfect!
 

Oct 31, 2006
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#15
yes, even dslrs have limits.

just keep shooting, and being self-critical (not overly so though).. and you will improve in no time. :) practice makes perfect!
i'm practicing on panning. i used "sports" mode today under basic modes and did a somewhat panning shot. auto, not manual. still trying to practice manual on moving people and cars with apertures, shutters and whatnots. pics soon. still sorting out.
 

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