How to shoot dragonfly and butterfly


Oct 6, 2008
57
0
0
42
Woodlands
#1
Hi guys,

I'm using nikon DSLR with Tamron 90 mm to shoot flowers and insects. Insects are too difficult to shoot especially dragonfly n butterfly. Whenever I tried to shoot them, they flew away.

Can the experts advise me what are the factors to shoot those beautiful insects?
 

Diavonex

Senior Member
Sep 23, 2008
3,641
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0
Admiralty
#2
I find it quite easy to shoot dragonfly with my 75mm to 300mm zoom lens.

It is even easier to shoot such insects with a 20X Super Zoom Camera.
 

Last edited:

alf626

Senior Member
Sep 1, 2007
2,015
6
38
Singapore
www.flickr.com
#4
Hi Jeffrey. Shooting insects can be very difficult at times, you just have to be very patience and i am sure you can achieve what you want. Some insects are very skittish and i am sure you will come across drangonfly for you on a close up shots. Keep shooting. Cheers.:)
 

inckurei

New Member
Apr 25, 2007
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Jurong East
www.butterflycircle.com
#5

kuanwk

New Member
May 1, 2004
570
2
0
#6
Hi guys,

I'm using nikon DSLR with Tamron 90 mm to shoot flowers and insects. Insects are too difficult to shoot especially dragonfly n butterfly. Whenever I tried to shoot them, they flew away.

Can the experts advise me what are the factors to shoot those beautiful insects?
move as slow as the clouds.
breath as light as the breeze..
stop shaking. :bsmilie:
and follow uncle sunny's advice for the butterflies..
df's tend to come back to the same perch if u stay still and behave..

ur eqpt is sufficient to get both
(not sure if u're using a fullframe, do hear ppl moan abt the extra amt of work needed to get get closer 8] )
maybe more target practice on spiders (they let u get v close) or in the butterfly parks where they're more used to flashing..
or caterpillars to familiarize urself with the eqpt!

lastly, they always say u're never close enough, so keep going closer.
 

wongcho

New Member
Jun 8, 2009
236
0
0
#7
Suggest to try HORT park.
As the butterfly garden is a "concealed area" most of them tends to settle down quite quickly.
Very often they fly away but comes back to the same location. So stay put for a while and when they comes back and they probably accept you as a friend ba.
Good luck.
 

ed9119

Moderator
Staff member
Mar 11, 2002
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www.walkeast.com
#8
Hi Jeff, this is the Gallery section...... your thread is in wrong section .... moved
 

Last edited:
Apr 26, 2010
727
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Telok Blangah
#9
During macro outings (organised by Jacobs), we usually surround the insect why 3-4 person. The insect will try to move away at first but after a few flash fired from 3-4 cameras, the insect seemed "stunned" and stayed still!

Maybe you can try?:)
 

Oct 6, 2008
57
0
0
42
Woodlands
#10
alf626 said:
Hi Jeffrey. Shooting insects can be very difficult at times, you just have to be very patience and i am sure you can achieve what you want. Some insects are very skittish and i am sure you will come across drangonfly for you on a close up shots. Keep shooting. Cheers.:)
Thanks bro
 

Oct 6, 2008
57
0
0
42
Woodlands
#11
Oct 6, 2008
57
0
0
42
Woodlands
#12
kuanwk said:
move as slow as the clouds.
breath as light as the breeze..
stop shaking. :bsmilie:
and follow uncle sunny's advice for the butterflies..
df's tend to come back to the same perch if u stay still and behave..

ur eqpt is sufficient to get both
(not sure if u're using a fullframe, do hear ppl moan abt the extra amt of work needed to get get closer 8] )
maybe more target practice on spiders (they let u get v close) or in the butterfly parks where they're more used to flashing..
or caterpillars to familiarize urself with the eqpt!

lastly, they always say u're never close enough, so keep going closer.
Sound like hunting...thanks bro
 

Oct 6, 2008
57
0
0
42
Woodlands
#13
wongcho said:
Suggest to try HORT park.
As the butterfly garden is a "concealed area" most of them tends to settle down quite quickly.
Very often they fly away but comes back to the same location. So stay put for a while and when they comes back and they probably accept you as a friend ba.
Good luck.
好点子。thanks
 

Oct 6, 2008
57
0
0
42
Woodlands
#14
chillicutter said:
During macro outings (organised by Jacobs), we usually surround the insect why 3-4 person. The insect will try to move away at first but after a few flash fired from 3-4 cameras, the insect seemed "stunned" and stayed still!

Maybe you can try?:)
No problem. I'll try
 

zac08

Senior Member
Feb 21, 2005
11,755
0
0
East
#16
The key point is to understand your subject.

Butterflies are skitterish during the afternoon and will not settle easily for you to take any decent pics. It's best to shoot them early in the morning or late afternoon when they are more in a state of semi-rest.

Same goes for dragonflies but they tend to hover near water areas and will rest on the same perch over and over again if you allow them to.

Go spot them in the fields or gardens over a couple of days and you'll know them better. :)
 

Diavonex

Senior Member
Sep 23, 2008
3,641
0
0
Admiralty
#17
This particular breed of dragonfly allows me to get within 5" to 6". They can be found at Admiralty Park.



 

#18
Butterflies are skitterish during the afternoon and will not settle easily for you to take any decent pics. It's best to shoot them early in the morning or late afternoon when they are more in a state of semi-rest.
:thumbsup: This is solid advice. You ask a question and you got an answer :) A longer lens with macro capability would increase your chances too. Getting too near and they will just fly away.
 

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