How to "read" lenses


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ernie1984

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Apr 23, 2006
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#1
Hi..i'm new here.. i notice tat there are some labels on lenses..like 15-55mm, blah blah blah.. can anyone tell me what does this mean and what type of lense is suitable for what type of scenes?
is it good if i own a wide angle lens and a telephoto lens? thanks alot =)

i trying to change my digicam(currently using a Canon A520) to either a semi pro one..or a DSLR.. budget is below $1400 ( i would prefer canon though)
any particular model u guys recommend?

thanks alot =)
 

pRoLoS3r

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Nov 15, 2005
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Yio Chu Kang, Singapore
#2
I think u may have meant 17 - 55mm, 17 - 55mm refers to the focal lens of the lens..

Usually it is followed by a F number, (e.g. f2.8 or f3.5 - 5.6) that is the aperture size.

There are lenses tt perform better in various areas, like a smaller F number lenses can shoot in low lighting with a wider aperture. Each lenses actually has its own characteristics, sharpness, distortion, etc...

I dont think there is a lens specific for each task.

Having a wide angle and a tele allows u to covers a range of focal length.. it may be helpful to start off photography.
It actually depends on your shooting style.

Hope this helps.
 

#3
Hi..i'm new here.. i notice tat there are some labels on lenses..like 15-55mm, blah blah blah.. can anyone tell me what does this mean and what type of lense is suitable for what type of scenes?
is it good if i own a wide angle lens and a telephoto lens? thanks alot =)

i trying to change my digicam(currently using a Canon A520) to either a semi pro one..or a DSLR.. budget is below $1400 ( i would prefer canon though)
any particular model u guys recommend?

thanks alot =)
Try this:
http://forums.clubsnap.org/showthread.php?t=44948
Although it's stuffs are CANON, the "labels" for lenses and cam are almost the same.
 

ernie1984

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Apr 23, 2006
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#4
thanks guys... i'm thinking of getting a fujifilm finepix S9600.. or a Canon Powershot A640

i got a friend who is into photography and he says its a powerful non SLR camera.. what do you guys think? worth a investment for someone starting photography??

btw.. i decided not to get a DSLR as i find the accessories quite ex..
 

kzone

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Oct 18, 2004
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#5
Usually it is followed by a F number, (e.g. f2.8 or f3.5 - 5.6) that is the aperture size.
QUOTE]

Err.. is there such thing as lowest aperture sz (high f number) for a particular lens?
 

pRoLoS3r

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Nov 15, 2005
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Yio Chu Kang, Singapore
#6
Usually it is followed by a F number, (e.g. f2.8 or f3.5 - 5.6) that is the aperture size.
QUOTE]

Err.. is there such thing as lowest aperture sz (high f number) for a particular lens?
Yep. There is. You have to check the lens specifications. It should be written.
But most of the time, ppl will only bother abt the widest aperature it can go (smallest f number).
 

kzone

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Oct 18, 2004
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#7
If i'm taking scenery & landscapes, how high f can I go to get max DOF? Or is the limiting factor usually the amt of light presence & not the f of the lens?
 

westwest1

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Feb 25, 2006
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#8
If i'm taking scenery & landscapes, how high f can I go to get max DOF? Or is the limiting factor usually the amt of light presence & not the f of the lens?
you can try use f16~f22 to take...
 

Oct 5, 2003
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Tiny Red Dot
www.flickr.com
#9
If i'm taking scenery & landscapes, how high f can I go to get max DOF? Or is the limiting factor usually the amt of light presence & not the f of the lens?
landscape normally you'll probably b using 8, 11, 16...
of coz lighting condition is a concern, but you should know there are actually only a few timing that you will b taking landscape...
also, you can use slow shutter speed, so small aperture wouldnt b much of a concern.
 

kzone

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Oct 18, 2004
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#12
errr... what do u guys do fm 11am to 5pm when travelling?
 

Artosoft

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Aug 31, 2005
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Tanjong Katong
#13
you can try use f16~f22 to take...
Lens have its sweet spot 1 or 2 stop from maximum aperture. at minimum aperture, it will bring another problem (IIRC, difraction). When you take landscape, use wide angle. at f/8 or f/11 the DoF is enough for landscape.

Regards,
Arto.
 

Pauche

Senior Member
Mar 14, 2005
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#16
Sorry to interupt...... This statement is extracted from dpreview.com and I do not seemed to understand what it means:

"The C-8080 WZ is equipped with a 5x, f2.4-3.5 zoom lens. The focal length extends from 7.1 to 35.6mm, equivalent 28mm to 140mm on a 35mm camera."

1) It says 7.1mm to 35.6mm on the camera lens itself, but how does it translate to a 28-140mm equivalent? Any formula to calculate this?

2) And how do I know what focal length I am taking the picture at when I zoom it?
 

Stoned

Senior Member
May 7, 2004
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Changi
www.photo.net
#17
Sorry to interupt...... This statement is extracted from dpreview.com and I do not seemed to understand what it means:

"The C-8080 WZ is equipped with a 5x, f2.4-3.5 zoom lens. The focal length extends from 7.1 to 35.6mm, equivalent 28mm to 140mm on a 35mm camera."

1) It says 7.1mm to 35.6mm on the camera lens itself, but how does it translate to a 28-140mm equivalent? Any formula to calculate this?

2) And how do I know what focal length I am taking the picture at when I zoom it?
Multiply the focal length by the crop factor of the sensor, or how many times the sensor is smaller than the 24mmx36mm film frame. If you want a formula I'd guess it would have to be f length X [(24mmx36mm)/sensor size] to get the 35mm equivalent.

Kzone --> For effective landscape imaging you will definitely want to read up on hyperfocal focussing. Do note that, as Artosoft has mentioned, at small apertures, diffraction, which causes softness, is highly likely, although you do get more DOF.
 

Pauche

Senior Member
Mar 14, 2005
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#18
Multiply the focal length by the crop factor of the sensor, or how many times the sensor is smaller than the 24mmx36mm film frame. If you want a formula I'd guess it would have to be f length X [(24mmx36mm)/sensor size] to get the 35mm equivalent.
.
sounds complicated.... thanks for your input though.
on another note, how do I know what focal length I am taking the picture at when I zoom it at?
 

kzone

New Member
Oct 18, 2004
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#19
2) And how do I know what focal length I am taking the picture at when I zoom it?
Dont think u can tell. I'm using the 8040 & never notice any info on focal length on the cam.. not sure if can retrieve using exif reader though...
 

zcwnfx

New Member
Jun 6, 2005
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Potong Pasir
#20
if u are using a DSLR/SLR, u can roughly tell from looking at the lens. if u are using others, then perhaps not.

i think the EXIF viewer will show it, the aperture size and other info also.
 

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