how to prevent vignetting with nd filter


chuanzuya

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Nov 27, 2009
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#1
Hi,
im thinking of getting an nd filter for my sigma 10-20(77mm).. may i ask what size of nd filter should i get to prevent vignetting issues? help appreciated
 

aspenx

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Aug 10, 2008
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#2
No other sizes except 77mm will fit.......

You will want to look for a slim filter, if you are concerned about vignetting.

As to what "slim" is, maybe someone else can give better advice on this.
 

chuanzuya

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Nov 27, 2009
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#3
hmmm thks..will it be better to use a step up ring and get maybe a 86mm nd filter?
 

aspenx

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#4
hmmm thks..will it be better to use a step up ring and get maybe a 86mm nd filter?
Definitely not...

You are bound to get vignetting if you do that.

Basically, the more you stack in front of a wideangle lens, the more likely and the worse vignetting you will get.
 

chuanzuya

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Nov 27, 2009
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#5
Definitely not...

You are bound to get vignetting if you do that.

Basically, the more you stack in front of a wideangle lens, the more likely and the worse vignetting you will get.
icic.. ok thks for the advise.. :)
 

DrSpock

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Mar 12, 2009
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#6
Definitely not...

You are bound to get vignetting if you do that.

Basically, the more you stack in front of a wideangle lens, the more likely and the worse vignetting you will get.
Is it really? For a 86mm on a 77mm, I think You'll need plenty of stacking up b4 the vignetting comes into play. I'd be more concerned with the extra $$$:eek: to get a 86mm filter than a 77mm
 

Numnumball

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Mar 6, 2009
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#7
Hi,
im thinking of getting an nd filter for my sigma 10-20(77mm).. may i ask what size of nd filter should i get to prevent vignetting issues? help appreciated
Another option is is to get those rectangular or square filters (Slot in) like Lee's or Singh Ray.:devil:
 

giantcanopy

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Feb 11, 2007
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#9
Another option is is to get those rectangular or square filters (Slot in) like Lee's or Singh Ray.:devil:
no need expensive filters ma. any rectangular ND filter placed smack nxt to the lens will eliminate the vignetting. of course for very long exposures u cannot be handholding it always, and i tried using blue sticky tags to place the filters and lens in close proximity before :bsmilie:
( so much so for taking care of filters and lenses )

ryan
 

Dream Merchant

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Staff member
Jan 11, 2007
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#10
Definitely not...

You are bound to get vignetting if you do that.

Basically, the more you stack in front of a wideangle lens, the more likely and the worse vignetting you will get.
Is it really? For a 86mm on a 77mm, I think You'll need plenty of stacking up b4 the vignetting comes into play. I'd be more concerned with the extra $$$:eek: to get a 86mm filter than a 77mm
It doesn't matter how much, or how little one stacks.

What matters is the angle that the stacking creates.
 

Dream Merchant

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Jan 11, 2007
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#11
no need expensive filters ma. any rectangular ND filter placed smack nxt to the lens will eliminate the vignetting. of course for very long exposures u cannot be handholding it always, and i tried using blue sticky tags to place the filters and lens in close proximity before :bsmilie:
( so much so for taking care of filters and lenses )

ryan
Blue Tac, Gaffer, Duct Tape, Masking Tape, Cello Tape will all work well and usually does not damage resin filters if handled carefully. :)
 

chuanzuya

New Member
Nov 27, 2009
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#12
So if i use the 77mm fader filter vignetting wont really be noticeable rite? cuz i saw one in mass sale for $100
 

chuanzuya

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Nov 27, 2009
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#14
It will be visible at 10mm. Because its super thick, easily 10mm or so thick which is the thickness of 2 'regular' filters.
hmmm can tis be solved if i use a "fix-ed" nd filter? like say ND 4 or ND8 i guess that shud be thinner
 

aspenx

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Aug 10, 2008
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#16
It doesn't matter how much, or how little one stacks.

What matters is the angle that the stacking creates.
True. But TS was just asking generally......

If it wasn't for the angle, all those square/rectangular filters won't work cos the "mount" is already quite thick. :think:

But generally speaking, the more common step-up rings do introduce vignetting? Please correct if my understanding on this is wrong.
 

Dream Merchant

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Jan 11, 2007
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#17
True. But TS was just asking generally......

If it wasn't for the angle, all those square/rectangular filters won't work cos the "mount" is already quite thick. :think:

But generally speaking, the more common step-up rings do introduce vignetting? Please correct if my understanding on this is wrong.
Depends ...

Some of the step rings are fairly slim - around 3mm, and some are thick, ard 5mm.

If you use a direct single 77-86 ring, and the filter is slim, it may work because the ring throws the angle outwards. Should be quite easy to calculate based on thickness and angle, and crop factor of camera, which I assume is 1.5x or 1.6x since TS is speaking of the Sigma 10-20 lens.

If you look at the hard-core bellows type lens hoods used in medium format or cinematic cameras, they kind of look very much like a gazillion step-ring of subsequently larger sizes stacked up.

I guess it depends on one's longer-term objectives, i.e., look at 86mm as a standard to stick to or slim 77mm filters.
 

aspenx

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Aug 10, 2008
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#18
Depends ...

Some of the step rings are fairly slim - around 3mm, and some are thick, ard 5mm.

If you use a direct single 77-86 ring, and the filter is slim, it may work because the ring throws the angle outwards. Should be quite easy to calculate based on thickness and angle, and crop factor of camera, which I assume is 1.5x or 1.6x since TS is speaking of the Sigma 10-20 lens.

If you look at the hard-core bellows type lens hoods used in medium format or cinematic cameras, they kind of look very much like a gazillion step-ring of subsequently larger sizes stacked up.

I guess it depends on one's longer-term objectives, i.e., look at 86mm as a standard to stick to or slim 77mm filters.
Thanks. I guess the step-up rings I've seen are all on the thick side. I've never had any good experience with them...

Now that I think of it, KR recommends getting only 77mm filters and using them with rings. Still, it sounds like quite a "risk" to use step-up ring with a wide-angle to me.
 

chuanzuya

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Nov 27, 2009
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#19
i would just choose to get the single 77mm nd filter from dealextreme then only abt 12-13 sgd... qns nw is if i am shooting 30sec long exposure under broad daylight, what kind of nd filter shud i get(number) please advise xiao di :)
 

sabee

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Mar 12, 2009
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#20
i would just choose to get the single 77mm nd filter from dealextreme then only abt 12-13 sgd... qns nw is if i am shooting 30sec long exposure under broad daylight, what kind of nd filter shud i get(number) please advise xiao di :)
Beware of color cast on cheap ND filters.

As for what ND filter, you can use this formula.

Most ND filters are labelled ND2, ND4, ND8 and so on. It means that your exposure needs to be 2, 4 or 8 times longer. The common ones for long exposure are ND400 and ND1000 from Hoya and B+W respectively.

Suppose your shutter speed is 1/200s. With ND2 it will be 1/200s * 2 = 1/100s. With ND1000 it would be 1/200s * 1000 = 2s. So you can work out what you need. Only you will know what aperture you prefer to shoot at and what kinda of shutter speed you normally work with. But usually even with a ND1000 you're not gonna get 30s in bright daylight unless you are using a tiny aperture.
 

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