how to minimize handshake?


Status
Not open for further replies.

shawntim

New Member
Feb 13, 2002
487
0
0
#1
I've got a problem with my shots. In AUTO, it's almost 80% crisp and clear.. but in Program mode and Aperture Priority Mode, I get blurred shots in 8 out of 10 shots. Manual mode is even worse.

What gives?
 

andretan

New Member
Apr 19, 2002
471
0
0
33
AMK (near YCK)
www.flickr.com
#3
Your feet stance have to be correct. Right foot in front, left foot at the back to have proper balance.

Your camera-holding hand (right) should be tucked in to your torso, while the lens holding hand must support the lens of your SLR.

Before you fully press the shutter button, take a few deep breaths, and hold your breath, when you press the button down.

IF ALL ELSE FAILS.... buy a tripod. :D
 

Q

qhelix

Guest
#4
Originally posted by shawntim
I've got a problem with my shots. In AUTO, it's almost 80% crisp and clear.. but in Program mode and Aperture Priority Mode, I get blurred shots in 8 out of 10 shots. Manual mode is even worse.

What gives?
Handshake can be minimized by increasing the shutter speed. Here's why I think you're having problems.

Program Mode: Basically the same as Auto Mode, only you have more control over your camera. Check whether the flash is active, if not then activate it. Also, using the sync flash will also result in slower shutter speeds compared to using the normal flash mode, so just be careful with that.

Arpeture Priority Mode: If your arpeture is set too high (or is it too low?), the shutter speed will change accordingly. Generally having a value of F8.0 will result in a slower shutter speed as compared to setting it to F2.8.

Manual Mode: Here you can manually adjust the shutter speed, so if the picture to blur, increase the shutter speed to say....1/40sec.

Well, hope this helps!
 

shawntim

New Member
Feb 13, 2002
487
0
0
#7
Originally posted by andretan
Your feet stance have to be correct. Right foot in front, left foot at the back to have proper balance.

Your camera-holding hand (right) should be tucked in to your torso, while the lens holding hand must support the lens of your SLR.

Before you fully press the shutter button, take a few deep breaths, and hold your breath, when you press the button down.
wah.. a typical high alert position.. :bsmilie:
 

shawntim

New Member
Feb 13, 2002
487
0
0
#8
Originally posted by qhelix
Handshake can be minimized by increasing the shutter speed. Here's why I think you're having problems.

Program Mode: Basically the same as Auto Mode, only you have more control over your camera. Check whether the flash is active, if not then activate it. Also, using the sync flash will also result in slower shutter speeds compared to using the normal flash mode, so just be careful with that.

Arpeture Priority Mode: If your arpeture is set too high (or is it too low?), the shutter speed will change accordingly. Generally having a value of F8.0 will result in a slower shutter speed as compared to setting it to F2.8.

Manual Mode: Here you can manually adjust the shutter speed, so if the picture to blur, increase the shutter speed to say....1/40sec.

Well, hope this helps!
I'm taking these shots in my room with an exposed florescent ceiling light. Subjects are on top of a shelf about 1.6m high. I did not use flash. Could it be the reason ? However, I recently tried with flash and found that my camera can go all the way up to 1/10000 without the LCD prompting for any "error", hence i think using the flash can solve. I'm using the inbuilt flash. AFAIK, i'm not using the SlowSync. just forced flash. There's no way to control the brightness or any other settings of the inbuilt flash is there?

I also realized the inbuilt flash is very harsh !

I took the shots without flash, some at zoom, which probably aggravated the blur. What is the average shutter speed fast enough to freeze shots fast enough despite handshake? 1/40? 1/50? or 1/60 ?
 

art2d2

New Member
Jun 28, 2002
1,213
0
0
43
Beijing, Shuangjing
art2d2.zenfolio.com
#9
Try not to zoom too much, zooming will also higher the risk of handshake. This is what I normally use, if I'm using the wide angle of 35mm, I will try not to use shutter speeds less than 1/30sec. If I'm at 80mm, I will normally use 1/90 or above.
 

shawntim

New Member
Feb 13, 2002
487
0
0
#10
Originally posted by art2d2
Try not to zoom too much, zooming will also higher the risk of handshake. This is what I normally use, if I'm using the wide angle of 35mm, I will try not to use shutter speeds less than 1/30sec. If I'm at 80mm, I will normally use 1/90 or above.
is there a certain math for this ? I remember reading about a certain mathematical guideline telling how to judge (forgot which) setting based on how far the distance of your subject is..
 

tsdh

New Member
Jul 8, 2002
340
0
0
Singapore
Visit site
#11
Originally posted by shawntim

is there a certain math for this ? I remember reading about a certain mathematical guideline telling how to judge (forgot which) setting based on how far the distance of your subject is..
No exact math for that. Just a guidelines: handheld speed is 1/focal length. e.g.: if focal length 50mm then the "safe" handheld speed is 1/60. At 200mm, it is 1/250. And 1/30 at 28mm
That is just a common guidelines, which may vary depend on the shooting condition and the person.
 

ninelives

Senior Member
Jan 16, 2002
3,250
3
38
BB
ninelives.clubsnap.org
#12
get a $1000 tripod and head. remember to use cable release . if using canon , get a IS lens, for Nikon , get a VR lens, for Minolta ? ermm....well...got to wait...but so far my photo is sharp coz you must know how to make good use of your tripod, don't be too lazy setting it up. I am using 500mm and sometime 1000mm, no problem at all.
 

M

Midnight

Guest
#13
Originally posted by tsdh

No exact math for that. Just a guidelines: handheld speed is 1/focal length. e.g.: if focal length 50mm then the "safe" handheld speed is 1/60. At 200mm, it is 1/250. And 1/30 at 28mm
That is just a common guidelines, which may vary depend on the shooting condition and the person.
Good advice. Also, if you want to be safe, it is best to allow yourself at least one more stop in shutter speed than the common 1/n guideline, i.e. if you are using a focal length of 50mm, try to restrict yourself to 1/125s and faster. I find that this tends to be necessary with consumer/prosumer digicams due to their relatively light weight and therefore greater susceptibility to small amounts of camera shake.

If the situation allows it, try to bracket your shots at various shutter speeds. This can be done at negligible extra cost with digital cameras.
 

Q

qhelix

Guest
#14
Originally posted by shawntim


I'm taking these shots in my room with an exposed florescent ceiling light. Subjects are on top of a shelf about 1.6m high. I did not use flash. Could it be the reason ? However, I recently tried with flash and found that my camera can go all the way up to 1/10000 without the LCD prompting for any "error", hence i think using the flash can solve. I'm using the inbuilt flash. AFAIK, i'm not using the SlowSync. just forced flash. There's no way to control the brightness or any other settings of the inbuilt flash is there?

I also realized the inbuilt flash is very harsh !

I took the shots without flash, some at zoom, which probably aggravated the blur. What is the average shutter speed fast enough to freeze shots fast enough despite handshake? 1/40? 1/50? or 1/60 ?
Telling your camera not to use flash will definitely decrease the shutter speed. If you find your flash is too bright, you may be able to adjust the intensity of the flash depending on your camera, or at least decrease the exposure (forgot what it's called exactly).

Also, since you're using a digicam, just try your 1/1000sec setting and see how the pictures turn out and adjust accordingly.
 

shawntim

New Member
Feb 13, 2002
487
0
0
#15
Originally posted by tsdh

No exact math for that. Just a guidelines: handheld speed is 1/focal length. e.g.: if focal length 50mm then the "safe" handheld speed is 1/60. At 200mm, it is 1/250. And 1/30 at 28mm
That is just a common guidelines, which may vary depend on the shooting condition and the person.
what do you mean by focal length? Do you mean the distance between the camera and the object ? 60mm means 6cm, cant be right ?

How can we determine the focal length?
 

shawntim

New Member
Feb 13, 2002
487
0
0
#16
Originally posted by qhelix

Telling your camera not to use flash will definitely decrease the shutter speed. If you find your flash is too bright, you may be able to adjust the intensity of the flash depending on your camera, or at least decrease the exposure (forgot what it's called exactly).

Also, since you're using a digicam, just try your 1/1000sec setting and see how the pictures turn out and adjust accordingly.
without using flash, the shots are sharp, but dark. I'm unable to get a properly exposed shot, even after exposure correction. The lower shutter speeds allow more light, but at 1/20 speeds i cannt get a sharp shot.

Digicams like 602 can modify intensity of internal flash ? Didn't find that in the manual..
 

tsdh

New Member
Jul 8, 2002
340
0
0
Singapore
Visit site
#17
Originally posted by shawntim

what do you mean by focal length? Do you mean the distance between the camera and the object ? 60mm means 6cm, cant be right ?
How can we determine the focal length?
Focal length of the lens you're using.
If you don't know what focal length is, then don't worry, just ask at the newbies corner. Surely somebody will explain it to you.
 

Goondu

Senior Member
Jan 18, 2002
1,292
0
0
Singapore
Visit site
#18
Originally posted by shawntim


what do you mean by focal length? Do you mean the distance between the camera and the object ? 60mm means 6cm, cant be right ?

How can we determine the focal length?
Try here for more details.
 

mpenza

Senior Member
Jan 18, 2002
12,938
0
0
Singapore
www.instagram.com
#19
Originally posted by shawntim

Digicams like 602 can modify intensity of internal flash ? Didn't find that in the manual..
you could. it should be in the manual. if not use the "menu" button to navigate to the one for flash and change.
 

Q

qhelix

Guest
#20
Originally posted by shawntim


without using flash, the shots are sharp, but dark. I'm unable to get a properly exposed shot, even after exposure correction. The lower shutter speeds allow more light, but at 1/20 speeds i cannt get a sharp shot.

Digicams like 602 can modify intensity of internal flash ? Didn't find that in the manual..
You're using the Fuji S602Z? Well, I'm not sure whether you can adjust the flash or not, but if you can you should be able to find it somewhere in the menu settings.

I guess if not using the flash is too dark, then it simply means you cant do without the flash. Try playing around with the settings and see the results.

You could try going into Manual Mode, set the fastest shutter speed you can manage, set the Aperture to F8.0 and set the Exposure Compensation to a negative value. I'm quite sure your shot will still turn up under-exposed even though the flashs was fired. From there you could slowly increase the exposure compensation, followed by lowering the shutter speed and so on till you get the proper exposure for your picture.
 

Status
Not open for further replies.
Top Bottom