How to meter to get both foreground and sky expose correctly?


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m3lv1nh0

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Sep 24, 2007
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#1
HI Guys,

Normally when I meter the subject, i.e. model against a bright sky, the model is exposed correctly but the sky will be blown. So I guess the correct method is to meter the sky and use fill flash to expose the model correctly? Is that right? Question is, if I am using Av mode, how do I meter the sky but still be able to focus on the model? Use the exposure lock?

Thaks in advance!
 

calebk

Senior Member
Jul 25, 2006
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#2
Yes, use exposure lock. There is really no way to achieve having both the subject and sky in perfect exposure without a very powerful fill in flash or HDR, as the camera sensor's dynamic range just isn't wide enough.
 

night86mare

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Aug 25, 2006
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#3
HI Guys,

Normally when I meter the subject, i.e. model against a bright sky, the model is exposed correctly but the sky will be blown. So I guess the correct method is to meter the sky and use fill flash to expose the model correctly? Is that right? Question is, if I am using Av mode, how do I meter the sky but still be able to focus on the model? Use the exposure lock?

Thaks in advance!
yes. that is correct. this is mainly due to the limitations of dynamic range.. so you have to use fill flash to raise the brightness of the model to around there of the sky.

it is not easy though, to light up the model evenly so that it doesn't look as if you have used flash, even though you have. therefore it is actually best to make sure that the model has light falling on her, i.e. positioning her with a direct sun in the picture in the background is generally not a very good idea unless you have a complex and powerful setup, from what i've read. you will simply end up with a flashed model which has been obviously flashed.

can't you disengage the metering from the af point? i think it is possible in the k100d that i use. so just use centre weighted or something, since you would probably not place the model smack center in such shots.. and then focus?
 

ortega

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Nov 2, 2004
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#4
the question should be

"how do i see that the light on the foreground is sufficient to get both the foreground and background correctly exposed"

if your foreground is in shadow and the background is not, then how to expose for both?

answer is to get some light on the foreground

use fill flash technique
use a reflector
move the subject out of the shadow area
 

calebk

Senior Member
Jul 25, 2006
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#5
...
can't you disengage the metering from the af point? i think it is possible in the k100d that i use. so just use centre weighted or something, since you would probably not place the model smack center in such shots.. and then focus?
I think for most cameras, save the pro-grade cameras, metering should be independent from the AF point. For instance, spot meter should always be the center few % of viewfinder, regardless of AF point.
 

flipfreak

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Nov 26, 2007
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#6
wah lau. why u asking this type of qns sia! suddenly senile liao issit? this weekend shoot some xmm. confirm ur brain ok.

btw if u wanna achieve a very natural look with your concept, u need like 1200w strobes on location. then sure very nice. 600w shld ok also. u wanna do that for the shoot?
 

m3lv1nh0

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Sep 24, 2007
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#7
No la.. I just want to shoot a person with nice blue sky behind instead of just blown white. I use only Av mode so wondering what's the best way to do it mah.

I will try using exposure lock next time. Thanks guys.
 

May 28, 2008
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#8
cheap and easy.... dun need electric....

~ that's why there's this thing call REFLECTOR ~

seriously, that's why we use it during outdoor photos...
 

reachme2003

Senior Member
Oct 6, 2003
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#9
use manual mode. measure sky exposure. set camera settings accordingly. measure foreground exposure. it is likely to be underexposed relative to your camera settings. raise light level of yr model in the foreground to match camera settings. bravo, both well exposed!
 

fergo

New Member
Mar 19, 2007
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#10
No la.. I just want to shoot a person with nice blue sky behind instead of just blown white. I use only Av mode so wondering what's the best way to do it mah.

I will try using exposure lock next time. Thanks guys.
i dun know how most guys here do it but wat i do is i meter for the background and use an external flash to light up ur subject. remember not to over power ur flash! the result will look like it comes from a PnS in auto mode. ;)
 

Rashkae

Senior Member
Nov 28, 2005
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#11
Barring any reflectors or flashes, if your camera has DRO you can get a good balance, but at the expense of ISO noise.

HDR is the best bet here, though requires more post-processing.
 

Apr 6, 2008
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#12
Shoot in RAW, convert into multiple exposures, use individual files to 'brighten' foreground and still keep the sky properly exposed. I think this is a very good way to do it.
 

fergo

New Member
Mar 19, 2007
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#13
HDR is good.. but if its a snapshot.. think its pretty troublesome. (tripod, multiple exposure etc)
if its some kind of outdoor event ie. private bday parties, bbq at ECP etc etc. i dun think HDR would be a good choice or for that matter reflectors.

probably a single raw den use PS to split into 3 exposures. result definitely not as ideal as 3 raws ;)
 

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