how to have those silky effect without over expose


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tangcy

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#1
First picture, failed, no silky effect. Settings are:

F/7, 1/30sec, ISO 100



A bit silky effect but the statue overexposed.

F/8, 1/6sec, ISO 100



Any advise are greatly appreciated.
 

Tweek

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#2
I think the exposure for both pics are different. Were you on full manual mode? If F7, 1/30s gives you a correct exposure, use the same exposure, which is around F8, 1/15s (about there, not very sure). If 1/15s is not enough to give the "silky" effect you want, add a ND filter or a polariser, this should reduce a few stops of light, enough for you to take at a slower shutter speed.

In your case, since F7, 1/30s gave an acceptable exposure, using F8, 1/6s will inevitably overexpose the picture.
 

franciskc

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#3
u are wearing bermudas while taking the pic.
 

Shadus

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Hi, I'm not sure what camera you use. But for 'silky' effect, normally, shutter speed of at least 1/2 sec or longer is required. Usually, i try to get 2 secs exposure.

Firstly, why is your aperture still so big? (ie, f8). Use a much smaller aperture like f22 or even f32 if your lenses allows it.

When the above still fails to get u a sec exposure. You can use a ND filter. ND (Neutral density) basically limits the amount of light in a uniform manner. Get at least a ND8 (3-stop) filter. That should solve your problem.
 

megaweb

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#6
Originally posted by franciskc
u are wearing bermudas while taking the pic.
:dunno: :dunno:


usually what I do is to stack a ND Filter and a Polariser ... and use the smallest apeture value ...

- for dc , use f8
- for SLR , use f22
 

franciskc

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#7
ND filter on the lens... set aperture to F22 or smaller. Shutter speed will set from 2-5secs... for average flow of water eg.fountain. for waterfall <faster flow> 1/30-2 secs. Thats wat i use...
 

Shadus

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#13
Originally posted by Bluestrike

Mmmmm... that the filter that I'm going to get on the next SEED! hehhe hope they still have it! anyway, a ND4 is just as good!
hmm...dun bother with a ND4 (2-stop). I even find my ND8 (3-stop) insufficient. Going to look for a 8-stop filter next time.
 

tangcy

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#15
Originally posted by Shadus
Hi, I'm not sure what camera you use. But for 'silky' effect, normally, shutter speed of at least 1/2 sec or longer is required. Usually, i try to get 2 secs exposure.

Firstly, why is your aperture still so big? (ie, f8). Use a much smaller aperture like f22 or even f32 if your lenses allows it.

When the above still fails to get u a sec exposure. You can use a ND filter. ND (Neutral density) basically limits the amount of light in a uniform manner. Get at least a ND8 (3-stop) filter. That should solve your problem.
I am using C2100uz. Setting > 1 sec exposure will have total exposed picture, ie, total white. I think the WB shows +3.0 when I set > 1 sec. Does the ND helps in this case, by limiting the amt of light going into the ccd
 

Tweek

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#17
Originally posted by tangcy


I am using C2100uz. Setting > 1 sec exposure will have total exposed picture, ie, total white. I think the WB shows +3.0 when I set > 1 sec. Does the ND helps in this case, by limiting the amt of light going into the ccd
Setting > 1 sec will require the camera to go beyond F8 for a correct exposure for that scene, and since F8 is the limit of your camera, aperture can't go smaller anymore, and it's a definitely overexposure. The +3.0 isn't WB, it's EV, and it means you are already overexposing by 3 stops.

And yes, like I mention in my first post, ND will help, as it will reduce the amount of light, allowing you to use a longer exposure at F8, compared to without a ND.

Hope this helps.
 

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