how to find out nodal point?


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J-Chan

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Sep 21, 2005
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#2
Its mostly trial and error with pano head, assuming you have one already. Try to find nearby vertical objects that you can easy compare with the background, railings work quite well. The idea is to get the exact same patch of background frame between the same lines when you pan from left to right.. To eliminate parallax errors when you pan.

Not sure if this is the proper way or easiest way, just some experience from some spherical panos I did for a project some time back.
 

pitbull

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Feb 2, 2010
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#3
sometimes i wish that nikon would just mark it on the lens

i will try this technique
 

eyes

New Member
Nov 15, 2003
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www.aljazeera.net
#9
With all due respect, you are a professional photographer right? This is foundation level...


"Short rotation is a term used to define cameras that have a lens that rotates around the camera's rear nodal point (the optical point from which the focal length is measured) opposite a curved film plane. As the photograph is taken, the lens pivots around its nodal point while a slit exposes the vertical strip of film that is aligned with the axis of the lens. The entire exposure usually takes a fraction of a second and the camera's functions similarly to the method of viewing a scene by turning one's head from side to side on a steady level. It is also referred to as rotating lens or swing lens. Typically, these cameras capture a field of view between 110° to 140° and an aspect ratio of 2:1 to 4:1. The images produced commonly take up 1.5 to 3 times as much space on the negative as the exposure made by traditional 35 mm cameras." - (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Panoramic_photography)


"In 1845, Friedrich von Martens, an engraver living in Paris, developed a camera which made it possible to take a 1500 daguerreotype view on a single plate. Considering that the human eye covers a field of vision of approximately 60' and early daguerreotype cameras only 45', this was an important breakthrough. The Eastman Kodak Company marketed a camera based on similar principles, the Kodak Panoram, in 1899. In this camera the lens moves in an arc in front of a curved film plane. Snelson has used modern versions of this type of panoramic camera, particularly the Widelux, to take 140' views that are then pieced together to provide a complete circuit." - (http://www.kennethsnelson.net/articles/rachel_laffo_photography.htm)


"Whether you own a true panoramic camera or want to experiment with panoramic stitching software, adding panoramic photography skills to your toolbox gives you a wider view of the world and more creative options." - (http://www.mediacollege.com/photography/types/panoramic/)


True panoramic cameras : http://www.funsci.com/fun3_en/panoram2/pan2_en.htm



Incorrect, please read this site to understand more about panoramic photography.

panoguide: the guide to panoramas and panoramic photography
 

catchlights

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Sep 27, 2004
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#10
With all due respect, you are a professional photographer right? This is foundation level...


"Short rotation is a term used to define cameras that have a lens that rotates around the camera's rear nodal point (the optical point from which the focal length is measured) opposite a curved film plane. As the photograph is taken, the lens pivots around its nodal point while a slit exposes the vertical strip of film that is aligned with the axis of the lens. The entire exposure usually takes a fraction of a second and the camera's functions similarly to the method of viewing a scene by turning one's head from side to side on a steady level. It is also referred to as rotating lens or swing lens. Typically, these cameras capture a field of view between 110° to 140° and an aspect ratio of 2:1 to 4:1. The images produced commonly take up 1.5 to 3 times as much space on the negative as the exposure made by traditional 35 mm cameras." - (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Panoramic_photography)


"In 1845, Friedrich von Martens, an engraver living in Paris, developed a camera which made it possible to take a 1500 daguerreotype view on a single plate. Considering that the human eye covers a field of vision of approximately 60' and early daguerreotype cameras only 45', this was an important breakthrough. The Eastman Kodak Company marketed a camera based on similar principles, the Kodak Panoram, in 1899. In this camera the lens moves in an arc in front of a curved film plane. Snelson has used modern versions of this type of panoramic camera, particularly the Widelux, to take 140' views that are then pieced together to provide a complete circuit." - (http://www.kennethsnelson.net/articles/rachel_laffo_photography.htm)


"Whether you own a true panoramic camera or want to experiment with panoramic stitching software, adding panoramic photography skills to your toolbox gives you a wider view of the world and more creative options." - (http://www.mediacollege.com/photography/types/panoramic/)


True panoramic cameras : http://www.funsci.com/fun3_en/panoram2/pan2_en.htm
I see, you miss out the word in your earlier post.

In true panorama, the film (sensor) does not turn. :)
 

eyes

New Member
Nov 15, 2003
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www.aljazeera.net
#14
I'll try to answer you without the engineering jargons.

A true panorama photo has zero trigonometric variations from frame to frame.

A practical example:

Even finding the nodal point on an SLR, the distance between the objects in correlation to the film (sensor) plane in the first frame varies on the second. So for example, if a buildings are lined up exactly on a straight line perpendicular to the spot where the photo is taken, using the nodal point technique, some buildings in the photos will be further away from the film (sensor) plane and hence a perspective error. The nearer you are to the subjects of the exposure, the greater the error.

Although some errors are too small to notice and can be easily corrected on a computer, back in the film days, this is an absolute horror and renders all the photos unstichable without some complicated darkroom correction. Hence, the invention of true panoramic cameras.

A true panoramic photo is a photo with no trigonometric variation (or lossly called 'error') and require no correction after exposure.

This is one of the subjects covered in undergrad level year 1 (hence foundation).



what is "true" panorama? :dunno:
 

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wildcat

Senior Member
Sep 8, 2004
3,269
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Bedok
#15
If it sticks to the wall, it's done al dente.

Oh wait. That's for noodal. :sweat:
 

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