How to do toning via Dodge/Burn?


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phantasia

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Nov 9, 2003
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#1
Heya,

I notice that for many types of shots...what seperates the extraordinary ones from the average ones is really the toning...

Just wondering if you guys would like to share your workflow for doing toning via dodge/burn?

I've seen many fantastic photos whereby the toning really makes or breaks the shot...but yet i can never seem to accomplish anything similar.

Just wondering if pple do their toning using the dodge/burn tool in PS, or via layers and blend using dodge/burn in options...or any other workflows for that matter. ;p
 

espion

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Aug 25, 2005
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Dodge/Burn is a dodgy process. I used it as a last resort.

The most precise, versatile and effective tool for "toning" is Curves.

And "toning" is actually contrasts: how bright the brights are in relation to the darks/shadows. Fine details, textures, 3D effects, are all achieved once you know how to manipulate the curve to give you the contrasts precisely where you want it.

And then there are blending and masking which when used together is the digital equivalent of GND filters except that you are not restricted by any geometry or the number of stops in the gradation.

Usually the use of curves and blending/masking will suffice and you dont need to do dodge/burn which is can be called upon for the last 5% of the work if necessary.

And before that Selective Coloration and USM can also be used for "toning".
 

Sep 18, 2006
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#7
There are some actions at http://www.1clickactions.co.uk that use layers and are very good as an alternative to the standard Dodge&Burn tool in Photoshop. They are in Volume 4 also they do toning and split-toning actions in Volume 2
 

azul123

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Dec 4, 2004
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There are some actions at http://www.1clickactions.co.uk that use layers and are very good as an alternative to the standard Dodge&Burn tool in Photoshop. They are in Volume 4 also they do toning and split-toning actions in Volume 2
Is it very easy to use? these actions, does it still require alot of technical know-how or is it really just one-click and presto.

Especially, actions like whitening teeth, how does the actions know where in the image the teeth are?

Skeptical but want to try.. at the same time don't want to throw money away.

../azul123
 

espion

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Aug 25, 2005
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#9
Its best to avoid actions. I think if you are serious about your pictures you ought to learn the basics - which are just a couple of things - and from there you can do most of the critical processing required. For example to do digital GND you just need to know blending and masking.

And I can't see how digital GND can be an action: the number of stops in the gradient, the start, end of the gradient, how gentle or steep a gradient, and what geometry, are all picture dependent, and cannot be just applied as an action dumbly.
 

Sep 18, 2006
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#10
Is it very easy to use? these actions, does it still require alot of technical know-how or is it really just one-click and presto.

Especially, actions like whitening teeth, how does the actions know where in the image the teeth are?

Skeptical but want to try.. at the same time don't want to throw money away.

../azul123
They are the easiest I've found and also the most versatile. For localised effects like the teeth etc it's a case of running the action and then simply painting with a white brush. Personally I find this a very simple and intuitive way of working.
Many are "1-click and presto" but you can also adjust the intensity (unlike some) as they nearly all work on layers and don't harm the original.

I also believe that actions can be a great learning tool - by seeing what the action does and following the steps can be an excellent way to learn. I tend to be on the lazy side - if an action gets the job done then why reinvent the wheel.
 

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