How to do double exposure?


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The_Cheat

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#1
I'm a newbie in SLR, and would like to try my hands on double exposure. Hope that some old bird here could kindly enlighten me on this. :D
 

clive

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modern slr they have the multiple exposurefunction. can choose how many frames to multiple expose. the film advance mechanism will lock at the prticular frame u want to multiple expose. then u just shoot as per normal at that particualr frame

manual slr...go to use the tedious method: lets say u want to double xpose@ frame 9. when @ frame 9, expose for the first time. then rewind film. then go to dark place, cover the cam in a bag, ensure no light leaks, set f64 1/2000 (typically the darkest possible exposure) then click off 8 frames until u reach the 9th frame. supposedly its supposed 2b @ the 9th frame..coz film advance may be "off" by a bit.

exposure wise:

lets say for double exposure, the first shot supposed to be done @ say f4 1/60, and the next shot supposed to be done @ f4 1/60 also. but because u double expose on that frame, the first shot u got to actually expose at a one stop darker EV than f4 1/60, in order to avoid the properties of the first shot being overexposed when u do the second shot on the same frame. eg u can either choose anythign like f5.6 1/60 or f4 1/125 ...u get the idea.

for triple exposure, like wise the first shot got to deliberately under expose by 2 stops, the second by one stop, the third no need to compensate.
 

The_Cheat

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#3
clive said:
exposure wise:

lets say for double exposure, the first shot supposed to be done @ say f4 1/60, and the next shot supposed to be done @ f4 1/60 also. but because u double expose on that frame, the first shot u got to actually expose at a one stop darker EV than f4 1/60, in order to avoid the properties of the first shot being overexposed when u do the second shot on the same frame. eg u can either choose anythign like f5.6 1/60 or f4 1/125 ...u get the idea.

for triple exposure, like wise the first shot got to deliberately under expose by 2 stops, the second by one stop, the third no need to compensate.
Hey clive!

Thanks for the enlightenment. I'd yet to try the multiple exposure mode on the SLR... think it's time to read the manual! :(

Oh! Don't mind if I ask another question. Let say if I want to have a scenery on my first exposure, and a faint close-up of an item for the second exposure, is it okay if I use different aperture size and shutter speed? I mean, most of the time, for lanscape, one would choose slower shutter speed and smaller aperture, while a reverse is preferred for close-ups, right? In that case, is it okay?

Also, for double exposure on a colour film, is it important that both shots must have similar colour scheme?

Regards,
Adam
 

james m

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#4
cheatchu79 said:
Also, for double exposure on a colour film, is it important that both shots must have similar colour scheme?

Regards,
Adam
not at all ....

There is a Multiple Exposer Project that has been started by Milo from ___easy read(0)+(O)+(MIlO)

The idea behind this is that one person exposes a roll of film then sends it to some one to expose and process. With this you have no idea what the other person has shot till the roll is processed.

have a look at Multiple Exposer Project or here, here, here, and here for some of the pics so far.

So far they have used neg or slide film and even xprocessing some of the rolls of slide.

I am about to shoot a few rolls here in Australia then send them off to people in the US and Canada as part of the project.
 

clive

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cheatchu79 said:
is it okay if I use different aperture size and shutter speed?
yupz its ok, no restrictions on that. becoz i nthe first place, the 2 shots to be merged together are totally different shots. a busy street scene usign 24mm shot @f11 1/60 can combine with a close-up of a rose shot using 200mm@ f2.8 1/8. the creative potentials of multiple exposure is only limited by your imagination.. its just that i lazily used f4 1/60 as a typical example all the time ;-)


colour scheme?...i suppose those "too extreme" examples like say a close-up of a fair-skin color lady in a white gown in a room with white walls wont go well with say..a nighttime wideangle view of CBD skyline @9pm... but u can always try or experiment and get all kinds of imaginative results ^_^
 

The_Cheat

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Hey thanks a lot for the advices. Err... another query: this kind of experimentation would burn out a lot of film, is it? :dunno:
 

The_Cheat

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#7
james m said:
not at all ....

There is a Multiple Exposer Project that has been started by Milo from ___easy read(0)+(O)+(MIlO)

The idea behind this is that one person exposes a roll of film then sends it to some one to expose and process. With this you have no idea what the other person has shot till the roll is processed.

have a look at Multiple Exposer Project or here, here, here, and here for some of the pics so far.

So far they have used neg or slide film and even xprocessing some of the rolls of slide.

I am about to shoot a few rolls here in Australia then send them off to people in the US and Canada as part of the project.
Hee~! The multiple exposure shots are way cool! :thumbsup:
 

roygoh

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Nikon FE2 and some other manual SLR bodies have a multi-exposure lever near the film advance lever. If the multi-exposure lever is held down before the film advance lever is turned, the film will not advance while the shutter cocks, so that the next exposure will be on the same frame. Technically, this can be done unlimited times ont he same frame.
 

ziploc

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#10
Hi DavidLim,

Not sure about other DSLR, but Fuji S2 does support multiple exposure. Anyway, if you are shooting digital, you can always do it in PS. Here is one such sample where I combined an orchid picture taken in BG with a frozen ice picture: ;)

Orchid in Deep Freeze
 

TME

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#11
Hi ziploc, that's a nice pic. Was that a ice carving (the frozen picture u mentioned? Looks like a painting actually.... :thumbsup:
 

ziploc

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#12
Hi TME,

Glad that you like the picture. The ice picture was actually taken at a frozen river above 4500m when I was trekking in the Himalayas, and is part of a series of pictures which I titled "Icy World" (they were posted in these threads: set1 set2 set3). :)
 

TME

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#13
ziploc said:
Hi TME,

Glad that you like the picture. The ice picture was actually taken at a frozen river above 4500m when I was trekking in the Himalayas, and is part of a series of pictures which I titled "Icy World" (they were posted in these threads: set1 set2 set3). :)
I've taken a look at the rest of the series... wow! err.. a more technical question.... it must have been below zero up at 4500m, how did the S2Pro react? I thought most digital devices go a little wonky at below zero temperatures?
 

ziploc

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Hi TME,

The S2pro was doing fine even at sub zero temperature (the coldest was around -20 degree C). The problem was actually the batteries... I brought a lot of lithium AA batteries along with me, and they were supposed to be able to stand up to -25 degree C. Well, they were still working, but the battery life was rather short at those extreme temperatures.

Sorry to cheatchu79 for getting a little OT. :)
 

TME

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#15
ziploc said:
Hi TME,

The S2pro was doing fine even at sub zero temperature (the coldest was around -20 degree C). The problem was actually the batteries... I brought a lot of lithium AA batteries along with me, and they were supposed to be able to stand up to -25 degree C. Well, they were still working, but the battery life was rather short at those extreme temperatures.

Sorry to cheatchu79 for getting a little OT. :)

I see.... thanks! Sorry cheatchu79 also for OT.... :embrass:
 

The_Cheat

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#16
Hey! I don't mind the OT... always been interested in the sub-zero performance of the camera too! :D
 

yunir

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Feb 4, 2005
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#17
clive said:
manual slr...go to use the tedious method: lets say u want to double xpose@ frame 9. when @ frame 9, expose for the first time. then rewind film. then go to dark place, cover the cam in a bag, ensure no light leaks, set f64 1/2000 (typically the darkest possible exposure) then click off 8 frames until u reach the 9th frame. supposedly its supposed 2b @ the 9th frame..coz film advance may be "off" by a bit.
Is there a simpler way? As in, if I just rewind the film to the previous frame. Is this not really practical due to accuracy problems? :think:
 

student

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Jul 26, 2004
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#18
Adam, use your Toyo. Nothing simpler!
 

The_Cheat

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#20
student said:
Adam, use your Toyo. Nothing simpler!
I totally agree with you!

But err... I just wonder how come someone revive a thread that's almost 1 year old! :bsmilie:
 

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