How to create this photo effect?


wizz747

New Member
Feb 27, 2010
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#1
Hi guys,

I was just having a look at somebody's Flickr and I found this photo effect that I like very much. I've been looking around for the past few days at how to create this effect but could not find. Luckily found one such photo.


Here's the link to that photo:

http://farm5.static.flickr.com/4053/4535298668_f137190352.jpg

I want to know how he did that sort of black border near the photo's corners. Anyone can shed some light? Would be very much appreciated.


Here's from where it was taken:

http://www.flickr.com/photos/darrenbong/
 

ziploc

New Member
Jan 17, 2002
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Snoopyland
#4
Thread moved to Digital Darkroom.
 

Last edited:
Feb 22, 2010
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#6
First you have to create a layer above your photo layer.
Set this layer to "Multiply".
Then, take the brush tool and set the opacity to 40%.
Make sure it's the soft edged brush, then paint the sides as in the photo.
Keep on painting the sides until you are happy with how it looks!

Hope that helps :)
 

wizz747

New Member
Feb 27, 2010
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#7
First you have to create a layer above your photo layer.
Set this layer to "Multiply".
Then, take the brush tool and set the opacity to 40%.
Make sure it's the soft edged brush, then paint the sides as in the photo.
Keep on painting the sides until you are happy with how it looks!

Hope that helps :)
Thanks. I'll try that later tonight! :)
 

ziploc

New Member
Jan 17, 2002
4,577
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0
Snoopyland
#8
Hi guys,

I was just having a look at somebody's Flickr and I found this photo effect that I like very much. I've been looking around for the past few days at how to create this effect but could not find. Luckily found one such photo.


Here's the link to that photo:

http://farm5.static.flickr.com/4053/4535298668_f137190352.jpg

I want to know how he did that sort of black border near the photo's corners. Anyone can shed some light? Would be very much appreciated.


Here's from where it was taken:

http://www.flickr.com/photos/darrenbong/
This "effect" is called a vignetting. It can be caused by light fall off or vignette in the lens and not necessary PP.

Anyway you can create this effect easily in PS. There are many ways, and one of the simplest is to use "Filter->Lighting Effects". Another would be simply to use the lasso tool to draw a circle, feather the selection and invert it, and then create an adjustment layer to darken the corners.
 

Apr 6, 2010
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#9
Another way is to apply negative vignetting in lens correction...under filters>distort>lens correction...

u can do that same with lightroom...im not sure about elements but i believe so..

that's how i do it anyway..hahahah
 

digitalpimp

Senior Member
Oct 25, 2008
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Shèng Gǎng
www.wix.com
#10
Another straightforward approach (if you're using CS4) is playing around with these through Camera Raw:


You can also customize your tone curve to an S-shape to get radical contrasts. :)



.
 

wizz747

New Member
Feb 27, 2010
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#11
Another straightforward approach (if you're using CS4) is playing around with these through Camera Raw:


You can also customize your tone curve to an S-shape to get radical contrasts. :)

.
This is from Photoshop, right? Cos I am using Lightroom right now. Will be getting Photoshop very soon. :)
 

jopel

Senior Member
Dec 21, 2004
1,175
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#14
This is from Photoshop, right? Cos I am using Lightroom right now. Will be getting Photoshop very soon. :)
You can do it in Lightroom - Vignettes.
 

#15
2 ways to do it... either get a full frame camera and shoot with lens wide open. the vignette that you see is actually an effect created by the lens. if your lens does not have this, then you can do it in photoshop. Either a vignette plug in or get a burn tool, zoom out of the picture, make the window a bit bigger and start burning outside the picture working your way in. do i make sense?
 

wizz747

New Member
Feb 27, 2010
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#16
2 ways to do it... either get a full frame camera and shoot with lens wide open. the vignette that you see is actually an effect created by the lens. if your lens does not have this, then you can do it in photoshop. Either a vignette plug in or get a burn tool, zoom out of the picture, make the window a bit bigger and start burning outside the picture working your way in. do i make sense?
I'm sorry but you don't really make sense to me. But that's because I don't know anything about Photoshop. I've been using only Lightroom till now and considering about switching to Photoshop very soon.
 

ahmad0420

New Member
Mar 6, 2010
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Yishun
www.shadefotoworks.com
#17
I'm sorry but you don't really make sense to me. But that's because I don't know anything about Photoshop. I've been using only Lightroom till now and considering about switching to Photoshop very soon.
In lightroom, it's pretty easy and straightforward actually.

You can find it under "Vignettes" panel.

I'm not if this particular person use Lens correction or post-crop here, but looks like it's quite a heavy vignetting, so I'm gonna guess post-crop. Here are 2 ways you can achieve that kind of effect in Lightroom:

Vignettes > Lens Correction:

1. Set "Amount" all the way to -100.
2. Set "Midpoint to 100.

Vignettes > Post-Crop

1. Set "Amount" to -62.
2. Set "Midpoint" to 82.
3. Set "Roundness" to 50.
4. Set "Feather" to 87.

You should somehow get quite the same effect. ;)
 

ovaltinemilo

Senior Member
Sep 12, 2009
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Sin jia Po lah
#18
or simplest, download photoscape and use their digital filter for vignetting effect:bsmilie:
 

wizz747

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Feb 27, 2010
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#19
In lightroom, it's pretty easy and straightforward actually.

You can find it under "Vignettes" panel.

I'm not if this particular person use Lens correction or post-crop here, but looks like it's quite a heavy vignetting, so I'm gonna guess post-crop. Here are 2 ways you can achieve that kind of effect in Lightroom:

Vignettes > Lens Correction:

1. Set "Amount" all the way to -100.
2. Set "Midpoint to 100.

Vignettes > Post-Crop

1. Set "Amount" to -62.
2. Set "Midpoint" to 82.
3. Set "Roundness" to 50.
4. Set "Feather" to 87.

You should somehow get quite the same effect. ;)
Alright, thanks for the nice explanation mate. I'll try it in Lightroom tonight.


or simplest, download photoscape and use their digital filter for vignetting effect:bsmilie:
I'll try it in Photoshop and Lightroom first and see what the effect is like. If I'm not satisfied, I'll give Photoscape a try.
 

wizz747

New Member
Feb 27, 2010
210
0
0
31
Singapore
#20
In lightroom, it's pretty easy and straightforward actually.

You can find it under "Vignettes" panel.

I'm not if this particular person use Lens correction or post-crop here, but looks like it's quite a heavy vignetting, so I'm gonna guess post-crop. Here are 2 ways you can achieve that kind of effect in Lightroom:

Vignettes > Lens Correction:

1. Set "Amount" all the way to -100.
2. Set "Midpoint to 100.

Vignettes > Post-Crop

1. Set "Amount" to -62.
2. Set "Midpoint" to 82.
3. Set "Roundness" to 50.
4. Set "Feather" to 87.

You should somehow get quite the same effect. ;)
Thanks man. I managed to do it in Lightroom. It's come out nice! :)

I should try to do it in Photoshop and see whether it's nicer in Photoshop or Lightroom.
 

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